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The Year In Doom 2016: Counter-Revolution

The Year In Doom 2016: Counter-Revolution thumbnail


Originally published on the Doomstead Diner on January 1, 2017

“History is as light as individual human life, unbearably light, light as a feather,
as dust swirling into the air, as whatever will no longer exist tomorrow.”

 ― Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being

Every new year, pundits attempt to make sense of the events of the year past, or make bold predictions about what will happen in the next. Your scribe is neither motivated nor ambitious enough to do either. Our job here is to look at certain of the year’s events through the jaundiced filters of collapse and doom, the purpose being to make sense out of what 2016 left at our doorstep like a burning paper bag filled with turds.

Much is been made of the political developments – Brexit, the coup in Turkey, Syria and the refugee crisis, the election of Donald Trump as president, with many thousands of tons of aggrieved punditry launched in a nearly 24–7 assault of PR artillery to try to “make sense of it all.” There is simply no making sense of it within the confines of ordinary time and news cycles. Better to soar to the 50,000-foot level, unbearably light, to the vantage point of history, to discern larger trends.

This year’s events are symptoms of an evil zeitgeist which is bad news for those of us on the left or so-called “progressive” side of politics. They are harbingers of a sweeping counter-revolution, made possible by a 40-year assault on the funding and functions of government and its efficacy, such that even ordinary people question the very legitimacy of government itself. An underfunded government rarely works.

Never forget that it was the French revolution that gave us Napoleon. And that in 1933, The German Reichstag passed the Enabling Act, which gave Adolf Hitler the power to enact laws without the involvement of the lawmaking body. Thus everything that Hitler would come to do was perfectly legal and achieved through parliamentary means. Consider this on the eve of a Trump presidency and a Tea Party Congress motivated by the most atavistic impulses ever to spring from a Koch brother.

(And if you find this comparison to Hitler overly hysterical and are moved to invoke Godwin’s Law, allow me to refer you to the Tea Party Republic of North Carolina, where legislative Republicans enacted a putsch and passed new, restrictive legislation essentially stripping the newly elected democrat governor Roy Cooper of much of his executive power. Watch now for other states to start pulling the same shit. Feel free to join in a rousing chorus of, “It Can’t Happen Here.”)

When one considers who Trump has chosen for his own cabinet, the one common thread that seems to run through each is a prior career dedicated to opposing the regulations of said department. William Astore describes Trump’s cabinet as “a Coup Waiting to Happen” and as a clique of warrior-generals ready to end the American democratic experiment by the time the limos are parked at the White House.

Yet 21st-century America is witnessing a new and revolutionary moment: the elevation of losing generals to the highest offices in the land. Retired Marine Corps general James “Mad Dog” Mattis, known as a tough-talking “warrior-monk,” will soon be the nation’s secretary of defense. He’ll be joined by a real mad dog, retired Army lieutenant general Michael Flynn as President-elect Donald Trump’s national-security adviser. Leading the Department of Homeland Security will be recently retired general John Kelly, another no-nonsense Marine. And even though he wasn’t selected, retired Army general David Petraeus was seriously considered for secretary of state, further proof of Trump’s starry-eyed fascination with the brass of our losing wars.

And why does this matter, you may ask? Didn’t Truman appoint McArthur, and Bush appoint Powell? WTF?

 A republic… founded on civilian control of the military needs true civilians as a counterweight to militarism as well as military adventurism. Recently retired generals are anything but that; they’re not even speed bumps on the road to the next set of misbegotten military “adventures.” They are likely to be only one thing: enablers of and accelerants to military action. Their presence in the highest civilian positions represents nothing short of a de facto military coup in Washington, a coup that required no violence since the president-elect simply anointed and exalted them as America’s security saviors.

Mattis is one thing; Flynn quite another. By most measures, he has a reputation for not playing well with others. Flynn is known as an ideologue with a virulent, irrational hatred of Islam and a penchant, like his boss, of unburdening himself on Twitter. Often wrong but never in doubt, he was forced from his position as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency in 2014, after which he became a harsh critic of Obama. Of Flynn, Astore observes:

Rising to prominence during the Trump campaign, he led the chant against Hillary Clinton (“Lock her up!”) at the Republican National Convention in July. (His son recently helped spread the false rumor that Clinton was involved in a child sex trafficking ring involving a Washington, D.C., pizzeria.) Flynn, who sees Islam as a political conspiracy rather than a legitimate religion, is an angry warrior, a dyed-in-the-wool crusader. That Trump sees such a figure as qualified to serve as the nation’s senior civilian security adviser speaks volumes about the president-elect and the crusading militarism likely to be forthcoming from his administration.

One does not have to try hard to imagine a preference for military solutions to diplomatic problems being favored as part of “Making America Great Again.” And with Twitler already composing 140-character love poems to nukes, it is a short leap to see the Doom Meter set a couple of clicks higher. Never forget that war is always a great way to balance the books.

“There’s class warfare, all right, but it’s my class, the rich class, that’s making war, and we’re winning.”
– Warren Buffett, The New York Times

Military adventurism is bad enough. Meanwhile at home comes the Trumpenkrieg.

Look at what has happened over the past 40 years. Ever since Saint Reagan announced that “government is not the solution: government is the problem,” tax cuts for plutocrats and trims to the social safety net to pay for them have been the order of the day.

In broad strokes , here’s what has happened in the last 40 years: The Corporate State’s agenda has been to oblige American labor to compete at global prices through an assortment of “trade deals” long on exporting American jobs but short on results: NAFTA, GATT, Fast Track, FTAA , the TPP. Corpstate has worked to privatize social benefits and social services, abolish negotiated benefits like pensions and health care, slash taxes for corporations and the wealthy,  and has broken the power of unions. All against a background of massive deregulation: airlines in 1978, trucking in 1980,  telecom in 1984 and 1996, electricity in 1992, oil and gas extraction in 1980, and finance, repeatedly between 1978 and 2000. I’m sure you’ve noticed the benefits “trickling down.”

No? Maybe someone’s been pissing down your back.

All of these consciously planned policies have led to the manifestation of what Spawn of Satan Allen Greenspan once defined as the “precariat,” people who face diminished prospects of achieving middle-class status—a good job, homeownership, decent retirement. This is by design.

If workers are more insecure, that’s very “healthy” for society, because if workers are insecure they won’t ask for wages, they won’t go on strike, they won’t call for benefits; they’ll serve the masters gladly and passively. And that’s optimal for corporations’ economic health. . . how do you ensure “greater worker insecurity”? Crucially, by not guaranteeing employment, by keeping people hanging on a limb than can be sawed off at any time, so that they’d better shut up, take tiny salaries, and do their work; and if they get the gift of being allowed to serve under miserable conditions for another year, they should welcome it and not ask for any more. That’s the way you keep societies efficient and healthy from the point of view of the corporations.

Sound familiar? Don’t blame the immigrants, don’t blame the Mexicans: blame the plutocrats. By 2020, a study estimates more than 40 percent of Americans, or 60 million people, will be independent workers—freelancers, contractors, and temporary employees. This constituency—notably white—is angry, and with good cause. Since 1998 white Americans have seen declines in both their incomes and life expectancy, with large spikes in suicide and fatalities related to alcohol and drug abuse. These are the people who, in anger and hopelessness, have chosen a billionaire builder who stiffs his subcontractors.

With Trump and the Tea Party foxes in charge of the henhouse, there is little question about the future direction of economic policy. The end game will be not only the dismantling of the New Deal, but also most of the 20th century. The only questions are whether and when the much anguished white working class (who voted for Trump) realizes how badly they have been played, and what they will do about it.

“There’s one issue that will define the contours of this century more dramatically than any other, and that is the urgent and growing threat of a changing climate.”
— U.S. President Barack Obama

“The concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive.”

— U.S. President-Elect Donald J. Trump

The assortment of oilmen, climate change deniers and other sociopaths that Trump has chosen to direct energy and environmental policy will exacerbate the greatest existential threat of the age. We are supposed to ignore the record of  the hardcore climate denier that Trump named his chief White House strategist, the hardcore climate denier Trump put in charge of the EPA, the climate action opponent Trump named as his Chief of Staff, the fossil fuel executives and lobbyists placed in charge of Energy and Interior, and the conservative Supreme Court judge he can name who will ratify whatever. This at a time when every sober observer of world climate is waving frantically signaling that we must do something NOW.

The human onslaught to destroy life on Earth is unprecedented in Earth’s history. In a sobering article, Life on Earth is Dying. Thousands of Species Cease to ExistRobert J. Burrowes reviews the heinous toll of man’s environmental dominion:

Planet Earth is now experiencing its sixth mass extinction event and Homo sapiens sapiens is the cause. Moreover, this mass extinction event is accelerating and is so comprehensive in its impact that the piecemeal measures being taken by the United Nations, international agencies and governments constitute a tokenism that is breathtaking in the extreme.

And it is no longer the case that mainly ‘invisible’ species are vanishing: those insects, amphibians and small animals about which you had never even heard, assuming they have been identified and given a name by humans.

Of course, some of what is happening is related to the ongoing climate catastrophe and there isn’t any good news on that front. See ‘What’s Happening in the Arctic is Astonishing’.

Of course, military violence has devastating consequences on the Earth’s ecosystems too, destroying land, water and atmosphere (not to mention killing human beings) in the fight over resources.

When Fox News’ Chris Wallace asked Donald Trump about his thoughts on climate change, the president-elect responded,

“Nobody really knows. Look, I’m somebody that gets it, and nobody really knows. It’s not something that’s so hard and fast.”

He’s not alone; according to Pew Research less than half (48%) of all American adults believe that the Earth is warming mostly due to human activity. They are wrong, if consistent; in 2016, news from around the world made climate change undeniable to anyone paying attention. And Trump has made certain noises about getting NASA out of the earth-monitoring business, the better to not confuse citizens with evidence that might interfere with worship of “growth.”

As climate change becomes ever more observable and its effects more evident, half of Americans remain firmly in denial. Ecocide is an appropriate word. And in the view of cynics, earth will be just fine in the long run; it’s humans that will have it tougher.

An impressive array of notable people left us in 2016: Prince, Mohammad Ali, Alan Rickman, Carrie Fisher, Fidel Castro, John Glenn, Nancy Reagan, Arnold Palmer, and Leonard Cohen. But 2016 left us Trump. Fuck us.


 Doomstead Diner by Surly 

12 Comments on "The Year In Doom 2016: Counter-Revolution"

  1. twocats on Tue, 3rd Jan 2017 1:35 pm 

    The hitting of peak oil has had a myriad of impacts that (much like climate change) is perhaps not the sole cause of various events but is certainly “loading the dice” of systematic failure and collapse that began in and around 2002 — from politics, to the economy, to the fabric of society itself. LTO has definitely slowed the fraying (in many parts of the US at least) and for some the wounds of 2008 have healed. For those areas where the hot money is swirling (west coast real estate) it must seem like 2008 never happened or was even a good thing. Politically I’d say Trump is as big of a step down as the Financial Crises was economically.

  2. Boat on Tue, 3rd Jan 2017 1:44 pm 

    two cats,

    You must have missed the recent peak in global production. With world demand around 1.3 Mbpd you can expect more peak oil highs for years to come. For peak oil to happen demand has to reverse. That hasn’t happened yet. PS OPEC cuts are the sign of a long period of glut, not depletion.

  3. Dredd on Tue, 3rd Jan 2017 4:57 pm 

    Dire but spot on post.

    Meanwhile its calendar time again (A Savvy Ecocosmological Earth Calendar – Revisited – 2)

  4. penury on Tue, 3rd Jan 2017 5:58 pm 

    Oh these poor mis-treated Democrats, listen to them cry and enumerate all the horrible things Trump is going to do/ He will not be as awesome and wonderful as the current POTUS
    Why unemployment is going to increase, he will not create employment opportunities that are available under Dem. Democratic party BS, any way to destroy the new Pres will be fair game for these partisans.

  5. Hubert on Tue, 3rd Jan 2017 7:20 pm 

    It’s too late to save anything. America is done. It’s been ruled by idiots for the last 50 years.

  6. makati1 on Tue, 3rd Jan 2017 8:46 pm 

    Hubert, yep, at least that long. It is obvious from the last election that they are now looking under the barrel for the dregs to elect. The U$ is the laughing stock of the world and has displayed its nakedness for the whole world to see.

  7. DerHundistlos on Tue, 3rd Jan 2017 10:32 pm 

    Yes, these “nameless” species makeup the intricate web of life on which stupid-kind depends for his existence. Who knows at which point the entire system implodes, but I and I think most people have a sense we are closing in on the abyss. We have been deemed a failed species, and the failed species must be extinguished before irreparable harm is done.

    The last time Republicans controlled the presidency and Congress was in 1928, and the U.S. sunk into the Great Depression within a year.

  8. GregT on Tue, 3rd Jan 2017 11:28 pm 

    “For peak oil to happen demand has to reverse.”

    More Boat total and complete nonsense.

  9. Sissyfuss on Wed, 4th Jan 2017 10:07 am 

    Nothing can change the trajectory of our species at this point. Overpopulation, resource depletion, and climate disruption has only one destination. And the road sign reads “Collapse Ahead”.

  10. onlooker on Wed, 4th Jan 2017 10:18 am 

    Yep, a train too big in weight with too much momentum doing damage to the tracks does mean collapse.

  11. Davy on Thu, 5th Jan 2017 7:44 am 

    “It’s The “Most Volatile” Year For Political Risk Since World War II”

    “In 2017 we enter a period of geopolitical recession,” warns Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer, adding that international war or “the breakdown of major central government institutions” isn’t inevitable, though “such an outcome is now thinkable.” In the company’s 19th annual outlook, Eurasia fears that U.S. unilateralism under Donald Trump, China’s growing assertiveness and a weakened German Chancellor Angela Merkel will make 2017 the “most volatile” year for political risk since World War II.”

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