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A year of historic change in Saudi Arabia, with more to come

For discussions of events and conditions not necessarily related to Peak Oil.

A year of historic change in Saudi Arabia, with more to come

Unread postby AdamB » Fri 29 Dec 2017, 20:55:45

Saudi Arabia in 2017 laid the groundwork for momentous change next year, defying its conservative reputation for slow, cautious reforms by announcing plans to let women drive, allow movie theaters to return and to issue tourist visas. The kingdom could even get a new king. King Salman and his ambitious 32-year-old son and heir, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, have upended decades of royal family protocol, social norms and traditional ways of doing business. They bet instead on a young generation of Saudis hungry for change and a Saudi public fed up with corruption and government bureaucracy. Here’ a look at the major pivots of the past year and the reforms to come in 2018: ___ WOMEN START DRIVING In a surprise late-night announcement, Saudi Arabia announced in September that it would finally lift a ban on women driving , becoming the last country in


A year of historic change in Saudi Arabia, with more to come
Peak oil in 2020: And here is why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Eleven Saudi princes detained following protest

Unread postby AdamB » Sat 06 Jan 2018, 14:39:15


Saudi authorities have detained 11 princes after they gathered at a royal palace in Riyadh in a rare protest against austerity measures that included suspending payment of their utility bills, Saudi media reported on Saturday. Saudi officials did not respond immediately to a request for a comment on the report.


Eleven Saudi princes detained following protest
Peak oil in 2020: And here is why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Re: Eleven Saudi princes detained following protest

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Sat 06 Jan 2018, 14:49:24

AdamB wrote:

Saudi authorities have detained 11 princes after they gathered at a royal palace in Riyadh in a rare protest against austerity measures that included suspending payment of their utility bills, Saudi media reported on Saturday. Saudi officials did not respond immediately to a request for a comment on the report.


Eleven Saudi princes detained following protest

The sons of the royal princes I met while attending college in 1977-81 were wildly wealthy by the standards I was used to. I was a poor young man, lived like a poor young man, aspired to fix that with a good college degree, and that was fine. These guys drove fancy new cars (Trans Am Firebirds fully loaded seemed to be their car of choice), lived in nice middle class houses, one to a several bedroom house, and had furnishings that to me looked like they might well cost more than the house, the nicest clothes, and on and on.

So I don't know how much has changed and what is typical, but I'm not inclined to assume Saudi prices aren't too poor to pay their utility bills (or generally unable to get a job and earn such money like everyone else).

Even if these folks' families have a wealth on the scale of a hundredth or even a thousandth of the scale of $billions I found with a quick search, somehow I have trouble working up too many tears over their "hardship".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_S ... _net_worth

Am I missing the blindingly obvious, or is this people spoiled beyond belief?
Given the track record of the perma-doomer blogs, I wouldn't bet a fast crash doomer's money on their predictions.
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Prince Alwaleed Finally Released From “Hotel Arrest”

Unread postby AdamB » Sun 28 Jan 2018, 00:47:00

Two weeks after we reported that Saudi Arabia's billionaire prince Alwaleed Bin Talal was reportedly carted off from the Riyadh Ritz Carlton to Saudi Arabia's highest security prison after refusing to pay a $6 billion "freedom fee" to Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman to secure his freedom, the flamboyant billionaire and Twitter investor appears to have finally cracked, and according to the WSJ, Saudi authorities on Saturday finally released Alwaleed, more than two months after he was detained in what was described to be a "widespread crackdown on corruption" in the kingdom but was really just a shakedown of some of the country's richest royals as well as arrests of MbS' political opponents. The FT quoted a colleague of bin Talal who said that He sounded very happy, well and the same"... if maybe a little bit poorer. "Prince al-Waleed is already


Prince Alwaleed Finally Released From “Hotel Arrest”
Peak oil in 2020: And here is why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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The Coming Fall of the House of Saud: Austerity is in, and t

Unread postby AdamB » Sat 17 Feb 2018, 19:47:13

With austerity policies sweeping the globe it was really only a matter of time before they hit the more affluent parts of the Middle East, although one certainly wouldn't expect the oil-rich kingdom of Saudi Arabia to be so hot on the heels of the "lazy" Greeks. The word "austerity" has however earned a bit of a bad rap with some and so rendered itself rather unfashionable in certain circles, resulting in no astute leader being daft enough to explicitly impose "austerity" on his or her populace. Nevertheless, when your nation's time has come it doesn't matter what kind of language you prefer to use, because when push comes to shove you either do as you're told and send increasing portions of your nation's population down the river or – and as Alexis Tsipras nearly found out – your country


The Coming Fall of the House of Saud: Austerity is in, and the Countdown to Saudi Arabia’s Fire Sale is On!
Peak oil in 2020: And here is why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Vision 2030 & the Political Costs of Saudi Reforms

Unread postby AdamB » Fri 23 Feb 2018, 20:53:04


A pillar of the Saudi social contract has been the allocation of oil rents to the population in exchange for loyalty and fidelity to the Saud clan. A key weakness of Vision 2030 is its lack of focus on the potential political consequences of economic reforms. The plan seems to assume that its ramifications will be easily borne by the Saudi population. However, the IMF postulates that the potential failure of the reforms to produce economic growth and ultimately private sector jobs for Saudis may lead either to rising unemployment and social pressures or increased public employment, which would have negative fiscal implications. If the government becomes unable to sustain its current level of payouts to the population, this will almost certainly result in rising public dissatisfaction. As more austerity measures are pursued, the social contract between the population and the government


Vision 2030 & the Political Costs of Saudi Reforms
Peak oil in 2020: And here is why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Re: A year of historic change in Saudi Arabia, with more to

Unread postby dissident » Sat 24 Feb 2018, 09:42:22

Utter propaganda. The KSA remains a theocracy which sponsors Wahabbi terrorists around the world. All these fluff pieces about reform are pathetic attempts to shift attention from the essence of this terrorist toilet and make it appear that the precious west has its hands squeaky clean.
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