Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

How to save energy through both societal and individual actions.

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Wed 26 Jun 2013, 16:27:22

C8 wrote:I wonder if all that shipping will have an effect of increasing melt via albedo reducing soot, oil and sewage discharge affecting chemical melt points, ships breaking dark lanes through thin ice and accelerating melt or wave action disrupting fragile ice, engines transmitting heat through the water? Every little bit probably makes a difference.


I am confidant it will have some effect, but the simple fact is global warming gasses have already altered the Arctic sea ice to such a large extent I doubt it will make much difference at all. The only reason the route has gained so much popularity so quickly is because the damage has already been done.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Wed 03 Jul 2013, 12:11:24

http://www.dw.de/climate-change-could-e ... a-16914245
But all those fears are tempered by the advantages of sailing along Russia's northern coast. A cargo vessel transiting from Murmansk to a port in China will use as much as 40 percent less fuel than if it followed the Suez Canal route, said Yoshinori Miura, head of operations for the Norwegian firm Det Norske Veritas (DNV) in Tokyo. "And for a ship that only has to go from Europe to a port in South Korea, the journey can be cut from 38 days to just 19 days," he said.
The ice breaker Vidar Viking Mar (Photo: dpa) Experts believe the ice cover will continue to decrease

Another advantage is that vessels emit far less pollution on the shorter route - carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced by 1.2 million tons a year by 2030 - while shipping firms are also able to avoid unstable parts of the world, such as waters off the Horn of Africa, where pirates regularly prey on merchant ships.

DNV recently conducted a study into the potential of the northern route and concluded that increasing demand will see transits increase to 500 a year by 2030 and 900 by 2050. There are clear benefits to businesses both in Europe and the Far East. China, Japan and South Korea were in May all granted observer status on the Arctic Council, the organization that sets policies on the region.


The saga continues, pressure to use the Northern Sea Route continues to grow both financially and politically. With the riots in Egypt and Turkey plus the civil war in Syria many shippers think the Suez canal is getting too dangerous.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Sat 06 Jul 2013, 08:57:41

Climate change will have both negative and positive impacts on the environment, economics and population of the Arctic region. Negative consequences of human activity change the environment, affect health and traditional way of life of local population. Positive effects of climate change also exist: heating costs reduce, and opportunities for agriculture, forestry navigation on the Northern Sea Route and extraction of mineral resources increase.

There was a clear consensus among participants that universities should become regional research centers and formulate an Arctic agenda: initiate research and infrastructure projects in collaboration with business and government, train professional personnel for work in the Arctic. Joint research projects are also important since they give an opportunity to unite efforts of all UArctic member institutions.

http://arcticportal.org/news/25-other-n ... lsk-russia

A group of Arctic region universities just concluded their first joint meeting in Arkhangelsk, Russia. For those who don't recognize the name it is one of the two major Arctic Ocean ports in European Russia, the other being Murmansk.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Fri 19 Jul 2013, 10:06:25

http://asmp.morflot.ru/en/razresheniya/

As of July 17, 2013 Russia has granted transit permission to 213 ships on the Northern Sea Route through the Arctic this year. While the majority of the ships are Russian there are vessels from France, Norway, Germany, The UK and PRC also making the trip.

Makes me wonder when American shippers will catch onto using this route.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Sat 24 Aug 2013, 22:23:11

When arriving in Amsterdam, presumably on September 11, the 19,000-ton vessel “Yong Sheng” will get its place in the history books as the first container-transporting vessel which made it transit along the Arctic shortcut between Asia and Europe. The vessel, operated by China's state-controlled Cosco Group, left a Chinese port on August 8 and is currently on its way towards the eastern part of the Russian Arctic.

According to Cosco, Asian goods could in few years be transported through the northern passage in significant volumes, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The China Ocean Shipping (Group) Company, Cosco, is ranked the sixth largest container ship operator worldwide. The company, which is owned by the Chinese government, is also the biggest dry bulk shipping operator, as well as liner carrier, in China.

http://barentsobserver.com/en/arctic/20 ... oute-21-08

I knew it was just a matter of time but the PRC is moving forward with the Northern sea Route faster than I had expected.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby sparky » Sun 25 Aug 2013, 20:30:00

.
As a cherry on the cake , Greenpeace is getting into it now
from the Financial times
"Russia bars Greenpeace’s ‘Arctic Sunrise’ from Northern Sea Route "

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/1136d6da ... z2d1QSDe00
further news state than Greenpeace will proceed none the less
probably some action / reaction will happen ,
Greenpeace is , shall we say , notorious , for media coup .
Russian authorities are exceedingly ticklish about the sovereignty of their borders
User avatar
sparky
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 3265
Joined: Mon 09 Apr 2007, 02:00:00
Location: Sydney , OZ

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Newfie » Sun 25 Aug 2013, 20:47:39

That is the NE passage. The situation on the NW passage is different, i think. It seems there is a fairly substantial blockage keeping small boats from making the passage. First time in several years.

You can follow discussion here

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f33 ... ost1313343

I vouch for Evans knowledge and he is obsessive about being correct.
User avatar
Newfie
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 9247
Joined: Thu 15 Nov 2007, 03:00:00
Location: US East Coast

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Mon 26 Aug 2013, 08:06:01

sparky wrote:.
As a cherry on the cake , Greenpeace is getting into it now
from the Financial times
"Russia bars Greenpeace’s ‘Arctic Sunrise’ from Northern Sea Route "

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/1136d6da ... z2d1QSDe00
further news state than Greenpeace will proceed none the less
probably some action / reaction will happen ,
Greenpeace is , shall we say , notorious , for media coup .
Russian authorities are exceedingly ticklish about the sovereignty of their borders


Be a shame for Greenpeace if their ship runs into someone who doesn't much care what the Western Media has to say and their boat gets disabled and impounded as a result. Media stunts like this are the reason I dropped my membership in Greenpeace two decades ago.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Sat 01 Feb 2014, 10:17:32

Never mind that Arctic sea ice rebounded 30 percent this year from its 2012 record low. (See related, "Summer Arctic Sea Ice Recovers From 2012, But Trend Is 'Decidedly' Down.") Seventy-one ships completed "transits," or complete journeys between the Barents Sea and the Bering Strait, up more than 50 percent from last year, according to Rosatomflot, Russia's state-operated nuclear-powered icebreaker fleet, which provides mandatory escort—for a fee. As recently as 2010, only four ships made the crossing. (Voice your opinion, "Arctic Development: What Do We Urgently Need to Know?")

A Year of Firsts

This year marked the first NSR transit for a container ship, and the premier voyages for vessels commissioned by China and South Korea.

Russia conducted naval exercises on the NSR for the second straight year, and capped the September flotilla with an announcement that the Kremlin would reopen an old Soviet Arctic military base.


More at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... by-russia/

Sounds like they are planning for significant expansion using the Northern Sea Route, maybe this will light the fire under the USA talk about the best plans for America in the Arctic Ocean.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Newfie » Sat 01 Feb 2014, 19:37:50

They are talking about the NE route, over Russia. The NW route is a whole different thing. The US has NO play in the NE route, that is ALL Russia.
User avatar
Newfie
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 9247
Joined: Thu 15 Nov 2007, 03:00:00
Location: US East Coast

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Subjectivist » Sat 01 Feb 2014, 20:15:22

Newfie wrote:They are talking about the NE route, over Russia. The NW route is a whole different thing. The US has NO play in the NE route, that is ALL Russia.

That makes the delay in US putting any resources into the arctic even more puzzling doesn't it? What I mean is if the US wants to compete in the arctic without needing Russian ice breaker guides then they better get busy building infrastructure and training personnel.
II Chronicles 7:14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.
User avatar
Subjectivist
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 4056
Joined: Sat 28 Aug 2010, 06:38:26
Location: Northwest Ohio

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Newfie » Sat 01 Feb 2014, 20:19:21

Subjectivist wrote:
Newfie wrote:They are talking about the NE route, over Russia. The NW route is a whole different thing. The US has NO play in the NE route, that is ALL Russia.

That makes the delay in US putting any resources into the arctic even more puzzling doesn't it? What I mean is if the US wants to compete in the arctic without needing Russian ice breaker guides then they better get busy building infrastructure and training personnel.


One of my favorite quips, for my favorite old man (me :roll: ) is...


"We don't deal in logic, we deal in transport!"

It got a slow start around the office, but it's use is being picked up more frequently.
User avatar
Newfie
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 9247
Joined: Thu 15 Nov 2007, 03:00:00
Location: US East Coast

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Mon 31 Mar 2014, 08:47:58

The Northern Sea Route has updated their ice forecast for the route during the June-August 2014 period.

http://www.arctic-lio.com/node/218

Image
http://www.arctic-lio.com/images/news/2 ... 26wide.jpg
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Mon 31 Mar 2014, 09:19:58

T - Your map doesn't show an ice problem west from the Kara Sea. Is that correct? If so it looks like a much easier sail for those Russian icebreaker LNG tankers from Yamal to reach the EU then heading to Asia
User avatar
ROCKMAN
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 10547
Joined: Tue 27 May 2008, 02:00:00
Location: TEXAS

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Subjectivist » Mon 31 Mar 2014, 09:32:40

ROCKMAN wrote:T - Your map doesn't show an ice problem west from the Kara Sea. Is that correct? If so it looks like a much easier sail for those Russian icebreaker LNG tankers from Yamal to reach the EU then heading to Asia

Rockman, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center the Barents Sea is almost ice free already this spring, so going west would be just like sailing in the Norwegian sea. See http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/
II Chronicles 7:14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.
User avatar
Subjectivist
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 4056
Joined: Sat 28 Aug 2010, 06:38:26
Location: Northwest Ohio

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Mon 31 Mar 2014, 12:59:38

Thanks sub. That's what I was guessing. Given that France's Total is a big JV partner in the venture it seems like shipping to the EU might be the best way to go. The EU would still be dependent upon Russian NG but not by shipping it thru the Ukraine. It also opens up the UK as an alternate market. Between the LNG plant, 200 wells and all those icebreaking LNG tankers it's a huge investment. Someone needs to buy a lot of NG for a long time to make the economics.
User avatar
ROCKMAN
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 10547
Joined: Tue 27 May 2008, 02:00:00
Location: TEXAS

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Mon 31 Mar 2014, 15:28:40

ROCKMAN wrote:T - Your map doesn't show an ice problem west from the Kara Sea. Is that correct? If so it looks like a much easier sail for those Russian icebreaker LNG tankers from Yamal to reach the EU then heading to Asia


Yup, the last decade or so the Gulf Stream has been making it further north and melting out the Barents sea early every year. My understanding is in 'light' ice the ships can move at 12 knots, but only at 6 knots in medium ice and only 3 knots in heavy ice. Also in heavy ice you might need two icebreakers in case one of them hits a heavy ridge and gets stuck, but not sure how this would change with ice breaking freighters instead of plain old ice breakers. I did see a video on YouTube last year of oil tankers navigating the Arctic Passage with Icebreaker support to pick up oil from an off shore terminal surrounded by drift ice.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Sat 19 Apr 2014, 12:17:06

Russian gas giant Gazprom has sent the first cargo with crude produced at the Prirazlomnoye offshore field -- the country's only Arctic offshore hydrocarbon project -- to the international market, the company said Friday.

"ARCO, or Arctic Oil, the new sort of crude produced offshore the Russian Artic has for the first time been supplied to the international market," Gazprom said in a statement.

The start of the Arctic crude deliveries has strengthened Russia's role as an international oil supplier, Gazprom CEO Alexei Miller said in the statement.

"We have raised the flexibility and stability of [Russian] crude supplies basically to any part of the world," Miller said.

A major European energy producer has bought the first 70,000 mt Prirazlomnoye cargo with delivery to Northwestern Europe under a direct supply contract, Gazprom said, providing no other details of the deal.

Earlier, representatives of Gazprom's oil arm, Gazprom Neft, which operates Prirazlomnoye, said the cargo was to be delivered to the Dutch port of Rotterdam.

As crude output at the field increases, part of the volumes will be sold under long-term supply agreements, Gazprom said, adding that in 2014 it plans to sell a total of over 300,000 mt of Prirazlomnoye crude.

The cargoes will be delivered to buyers by two tankers constructed specifically for transportation of the crude, according to Gazprom.

The sulfur content and the density of Prirazlomnoye crude is higher than another Russian crude grade, Urals, so the Arctic crude will trade at a discount to the blend, although the discount will likely be "insignificant," Gazprom Neft officials said earlier this year.

When the offshore field was launched in December, Gazprom said it planned to continue developing Arctic hydrocarbon reserves, such as fields in the West Siberian Yamal peninsula, based on the experience gained at Prirazlomnoye.

"There can be no doubt -- Gazprom will continue its activities in the Arctic," Miller said at the time.

Prirazlomnoye, located some 60 km offshore the Pechora Sea, is expected to reach its peak output of some 6 million mt/yer, or 120,000 b/d, by 2020.

The field contains recoverable crude reserves of over 70 million mt, located 2,300-2,700 m under the seabed.
More at the link
http://www.platts.com/latest-news/shipp ... e-21507826

Russia is making an early start using the Northern Sea Route this year, odds are it will be considerably busier than it was last year as traffic continues to pick up taking advantage of the time and fuel saving route compared to other passages.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 13910
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Sat 19 Apr 2014, 16:22:02

The Northern sea route would put the oil delivery in Japan not Rotterdam. What BS is this?
User avatar
vtsnowedin
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 7833
Joined: Fri 11 Jul 2008, 02:00:00

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Subjectivist » Sat 19 Apr 2014, 16:58:14

vtsnowedin wrote:The Northern sea route would put the oil delivery in Japan not Rotterdam. What BS is this?


Russia defines the Northern Sea Route as the passage from Murmansk/arkanglesk east to the Bering Strait, so any ship traveling from east of there going to Rotterdam would just be running the route backwards. Apparently Russia has been shipping oil along the route for some time for internal consumption, this is only significant because it is being shipped along the route for export.
II Chronicles 7:14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.
User avatar
Subjectivist
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 4056
Joined: Sat 28 Aug 2010, 06:38:26
Location: Northwest Ohio

PreviousNext

Return to Conservation & Efficiency

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests