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Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

How to save energy through both societal and individual actions.

Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Tue 09 Jun 2015, 09:18:27

A moderate bit of new news in Arctic Shipping. This piece is very pro shipping, which I find interesting. It seems like after a one year lull the push is on to have more Arctic shipping and to heck with the sanctions against Russia, there is too much money to be made by going the Northern Sea Route.

Global warming and Arctic ice melt have received worldwide attention in recent years. The opportunity that receding ice presents for the shipping industry with regards to alternative voyage routes is enormous – ships are starting to utilise Arctic passages for much lengthier periods of time and the development of new passages which were previously unnavigable is driving shorter trading times and fuel cost savings.

Furthermore, the risk of piracy can be avoided by using Arctic routes. For, instance, sailing from Shanghai to Hamburg through the NSR eliminates the risk of encountering Somali pirates – a significant threat to many seafarers when using the Suez Canal route.

The key routes currently connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are the Transpolar Sea Route, the Northwest Passage, the Northeast Passage or Northern Sea Route (NSR), and the Arctic Bridge. The NSR and Northeast Passage are essentially the same route, with the additional Barents Sea included in the Northeast Passage, and are therefore used interchangeably. In light of increasing ice recession throughout the summer months, the NSR has experienced high levels of interest and activity as a viable trading route for all-year round voyages.

Furthermore, under the Russian administrative system, international shipping through the NSR is expensive and confusing. Using the NSR across the top of Russia is often viewed as a better option for transporting goods from the Pacific Ocean to Europe as it is less ice-bound, and increasingly becoming so, when compared to the Northwest Passage across the top of Canada. However, in order to do this, a ship owner must contact Russia's NSR Administration several months in advance. This not only involves a lengthy and complicated process of approval but is also extortionally expensive as it involves paying a tariff which can reach up to US $500,000 a voyage.


http://shipandbunker.com/news/world/510 ... ed-to-know
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Mon 20 Jul 2015, 16:48:04

Chinese merchant ship "Yong Sheng" has launched its first two-way Arctic voyage from Dalian, northeast China's Liaoning Province.

Yong Sheng is a multipurpose ship loaded with nearly 10-thousand tons of export rolled steel products.

It plans to enter the Bering Strait in early August, and arrive in Denmark at around mid-August, before returning to China in October.

http://english.cri.cn/12394/2015/07/10/2702s886844.htm
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Wed 29 Jul 2015, 23:46:25

Here is a nice time lapse of the last 30 days showing the Northern Sea Route opening up for ice breaker free shipping.

https://youtu.be/i4Z_pGre3oA
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Sat 08 Aug 2015, 09:45:28

Stumbled across this web page that compares costs for using the Arctic routes vs Suez routes to ship from east Asia to Europe.

http://www.arctis-search.com/Arctic+Shi ... Sea+Routes
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Fri 11 Dec 2015, 23:36:33

Interesting news about the Northern Sea Route over on the Neven Arctic Sea Ice Blog.

According to the official, raising competitiveness of the Northern Sea Route is only possible if port infrastructure is seriously upgraded.

"Amid this environment it saves us effort of focusing on higher competitiveness of the Northern Sea Route tracks without serious upgrade of sea ports’ infrastructure, provision of modern logistics, saturation of generating capacities, creation of modern communication and navigation systems, provision of navigation safety," Rogozin said.

It's a no-brainer for Russia to start preparing for this, but I'm curious to see when and how the Northern Sea Route will be made navigable during winter, not just because of the ice, but also because winters tend to be stormy in the Arctic

http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2015/12/ ... .html#more
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby radon1 » Sat 12 Dec 2015, 02:31:03

Rogozin screwed the space industry, now he is trying to figure how he can squeeze more budget money using other "projects".
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Fri 22 Jan 2016, 09:15:32

New article in Bloomberg, lets all get rich from Arctic Ocean access! More at link below quote.

As chairman of investments at Guggenheim Partners, Scott Minerd thought he had a realistic view on how big an economic challenge climate change poses.

Then, at a Hoover Institution conference almost three years ago, he met former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz. Minerd recalled him saying: “Scott, imagine that you woke up tomorrow morning, and the headline on the newspapers was, 'The World Has Discovered a New Ocean.’” The opening of the Arctic, Shultz told him, may be one of the most important events since the end of the ice age, some 12,000 years ago.

And while Shultz’s spokesman couldn’t confirm the conversation, there’s no doubting the melting of the Arctic ice cap, and the unveiling of resources below, presents mind-boggling opportunities for energy, shipping, fishing, science, and military exploitation. Russia even planted its flag on the sea floor at the North Pole in 2007.

Energy and shipping have been first up. Norway made its national fortune drilling in northern waters, and Arctic fossil fuel exploration has become a more prominent part of U.S. energy policy. Melting ice means that in summer months, cargo can travel approximately 5,000 km from Korea to New York, rather than the 12,000 km it takes to pass through the Panama Canal. Warming waters also open up access to commercial fish stocks, making the Arctic a growing source of food.

Not long after that Hoover conference, Minerd joined a World Economic Forum advisory council. Its task? Develop guidelines for those nations looking to do business at the top of the world. That framework is to be released Thursday, in Davos.

“The history of economic development in regions of the world has really been fraught with a mass of mistakes,” said Minerd, who before Guggenheim worked at Credit Suisse and Morgan Stanley. “It really seems that someone needed to start developing a minimum standard, as a guide for economic development in the region.”

The Arctic Investment Protocol, developed by a 22-member WEF “global agenda council,” puts forward sustainability principles similar to initiatives developed for mature economies in recent years. The focus is long-term: tap the expertise of indigenous communities and treat them as commercial partners, protect ecosystems (even as rising temperatures change them before our eyes), and prevent corruption while encouraging international collaboration. The Arctic nations include Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the U.S., so there is a lot of collaboration to be had.


http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/ ... lion-ocean
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Sun 15 May 2016, 10:11:20

I missed this in amongst all the other news the last few weeks, China is taking Arctic shipping very seriously. Lengthy article at link below quote.

Beijing — China will encourage ships flying its flag to take the Northwest Passage via the Arctic Ocean, a route opened up by global warming, to cut travel times between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, a state-run newspaper said on Wednesday.

China is increasingly active in the polar region, becoming one of the biggest mining investors in Greenland and agreeing a free trade deal with Iceland. In 2013, the Arctic Council admitted emerging powers China and India as observers.

Shorter shipping routes across the Arctic Ocean would save Chinese companies time and money. For example, the journey from Shanghai to Hamburg via the Arctic route is 2,800 nautical miles shorter than going by the Suez canal.


http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pac ... al-warming
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Sun 15 May 2016, 11:12:02

Newish report from recent conferences in Canada, much more at link below quote.

Vessel traffic through the Northwest Passage has increased 166 percent since 2004, as sea ice has receded and created a longer shipping season. According to Canadian Coast Guard statistics, there were about 350 marine voyages within the Canadian Arctic in 2013. If the mining and tourism sectors grow in the Arctic region as they are expected to, traffic could more than double, according to a 2014 report by the commissioner of the environment and sustainable development.

Creating shipping corridors within the Arctic archipelago could minimize their impact on the environment, Inuit communities and their way of life and improve the search and rescue response, said Porta. “Corridors give people a roadmap to follow,” he said. “A robust corridor system is a recommendation for vessels to stick to a very, very small portion of the Arctic waters as opposed to now, where there are no limits – vessels can basically go wherever they want.”

Canada considers the Northwest Passage as part of its “internal waters,” which would give Canada the right to exclude ships from using it and require them to follow Canadian regulations. But other countries see things differently. The U.S., for example, considers the Northwest Passage to as an “international strait,” which gives it – and other countries – the right to use it to transit between Baffin Bay and the Beaufort Sea.

Developing a network of shipping routes through the Canadian Arctic must include a risk-based assessment of the region that looks at hydrographic surveys and charting, including water depths and submarine features, areas of ecological sensitivity, such as important habitat features and migratory routes, and socially sensitive areas that are used by the Inuit, the report specifies.


https://www.newsdeeply.com/arctic/artic ... -corridors
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Wed 22 Jun 2016, 10:52:04

Russia has unveiled their newest nuclear powered icebreaker, still under construction.

Russia unveils world's biggest nuclear icebreaker: Gigantic ship can smash through ice 10 feet thick and 13 feet deep

The enormous Arktika icebreaker is 586 feet long and more than 100 feet wide
It will be equipped with two water distillers, each able to process 70 tonnes of water
The new icebreakers from Project 22220 will be able to break ice up to 10ft thick, and 13ft deep

Russia has floated out the hull for what will soon be the world’s largest nuclear-powered icebreaker.

The Arktika is set to become the most powerful twin-reactor icebreaker, and will join the Rosatomflot fleet to help maintain national defences and navigate the Arctic.

The massive vessel is a part of the $1.9 billion Project 22220, and when completed, the Arktika will be able to process nearly 150 tonnes of water.

Russia has floated out the hull for what will soon be the world’s largest nuclear-powered icebreaker. The Arktika is set to become the most powerful twin-reactor icebreaker, and will join the Rosatomflot fleet to help maintain national defences and navigate the Arctic

The ship was launched in a gala ceremony at the Baltic Shipyard in St. Petersburg on Thursday, and is the leading ship in Russia’s Project 22220.

It’s been nearly three years since the Arktika’s keel was laid in November 2013, providing the structural support for the hull.

Russia’s enormous icebreaker is 586 feet long and more than 100 feet wide, according to Sputnik News, and will be able to break ice up to 10 feet thick, and 13 feet deep.

‘The Arktika’s launch is a victory in all senses,’ said Rosatom chief Sergey Kiriyenko.

‘Today we can say that by the end of 2017, this icebreaker will join Rosatomflot.

'This will open up fundamentally new opportunities in front of our country in terms of maintaining the national defences and year-round navigation in the Arctic and ensuring economic development in a region that is of crucial importance to Russia and the whole world.’


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... -deep.html
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Wed 22 Jun 2016, 11:11:28

I cant' think of what use they would have for 150 tonnes of water unless that is 150 per hour and what runs the propulsion turbines to the propellers.
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Wed 22 Jun 2016, 13:13:50

vtsnowedin wrote:I cant' think of what use they would have for 150 tonnes of water unless that is 150 per hour and what runs the propulsion turbines to the propellers.


Maybe in the off season it will be visiting Iran and selling distilled water?
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Wed 22 Jun 2016, 14:05:31

So Canada reports 350 voyages in 2013? They have plenty of room to grow to catch the Panama canals 15,000 a year. Or even the Suez's 1350.
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Thu 23 Jun 2016, 07:44:44

vtsnowedin wrote:So Canada reports 350 voyages in 2013? They have plenty of room to grow to catch the Panama canals 15,000 a year. Or even the Suez's 1350.


I answered your post yesterday but apparently the system ate it and refuses to burp it up. I think your Suez number is missing a 0 at the end, at 37 ships per day they would pass 13,500 which is close enough to reality for me.


So here is the short version, an old Panamax ship caries 5,000 TEU of containers and a New Panamax ship will be able to carry 13, 000 TEU of containers. The ship distance from say Shanghai to Rotterdam, Netherlands or NYC, USA is a minimum travel time of 21 days on a fast cargo ship and close to 40 days on an average cargo ship traveling at economic speed.

A double stack unit train using well cars can haul 420(ish) TEU per miles of length. Last year China did a test run with a unit train going from eastern China to Madrid Spain. Because the route is much straighter and trains can average a faster speed the trip took something like 8 days even though they changed rail gauge size at least once and possibly three times. For China shipping in Asia, Europe and possibly soon Africa is much more rapid and precise using rail cargo.

When you put 13,000 TEU on a container ship they arrive all together in a large port where the containers are sorted and distributed by road and rail, often to final destinations a considerable distance from the port. When they send the same TEU on a train from China the cargo system and distribution system are the same system, so it goes directly to the rail distribution facility where it is delivered to the end recipient by a short overland truck trip.

Meanwhile to take a large TEU cargo ship from say Shanghai to Rotterdam through the Arctic you cut the distance and travel time by 40 percent compared to the Suez rout, so I expect traffic their to grow even if nothing else changes. For shipping cargo the Russians charge escort fees because they require all ships on their side to travel under guidance from their ice breakers, but the fees are priced lower than Suez or Panama transit fees to encourage shippers to use their services.
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Thu 23 Jun 2016, 08:58:31

The missing zero is most probably true. I thought that number absurdly low but it didn't negate my point. I thought perhaps because much of Suez traffic is supertankers that are three to four times larger then Panamax (old style)ships that might explain it.
Chinese freight going to a USA destination has to be on a ship sometime and each loading and unloading takes time and money so freight heading from Chindia to the Eastern USA should probably stay on that ship all the way to the east coast closest to it's final destination.
When I bought my John Deere tractor it was assembled in Pune India and landed at the container port in Florida.
Edit to add:
Yup on further review it was 1300 ships in a month. 80,000,000 tons total
http://www.suezcanal.gov.eg/TRstat.aspx?reportId=1
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Thu 08 Sep 2016, 21:50:04

Anyone going to the big Arctic Shipping conference the first week of October? It would be great to get on site information.

https://maritime.knect365.com/arctic-sh ... a/agenda/1
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Fri 09 Sep 2016, 00:49:15

Tanada wrote:Anyone going to the big Arctic Shipping conference the first week of October? It would be great to get on site information.

https://maritime.knect365.com/arctic-sh ... a/agenda/1

My invitation must be lost in the mail room somewhere. :oops:
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Fri 09 Sep 2016, 08:11:26

vtsnowedin wrote:
Tanada wrote:Anyone going to the big Arctic Shipping conference the first week of October? It would be great to get on site information.

https://maritime.knect365.com/arctic-sh ... a/agenda/1

My invitation must be lost in the mail room somewhere. :oops:


Nobody sent me one either, nor can I afford to go on my own dime. I was just hoping someone on here lives nearby and might attending.
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Newfie » Fri 09 Sep 2016, 08:49:56

Link throws an error BACKEND IS UNHEATHLY


I don't even want to know

London, UK this year. Montreal next.
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Re: Arctic shipping to conserve energy.

Unread postby Tanada » Tue 10 Jan 2017, 14:17:24

Maps and graphs at link below the quote.
Shipping routes across the Arctic are going to open up significantly this century even with a best-case reduction in CO2 emissions, a new study suggests.

University of Reading, UK, researchers have investigated how the decline in sea-ice, driven by warmer temperatures, will make the region more accessible.

They find that by 2050, opportunities to transit the Arctic will double for non ice-strengthened vessels.

These open-water ships will even be going right over the top at times.

And if CO2 emissions are not curtailed - if the aspirations of the Paris Agreement to keep global temperature rise "well below two degrees" are not implemented - then moderately ice-strengthened vessels could be routinely ploughing across the Arctic by late century for perhaps 10-12 months of the year.

"The reduction in summer sea-ice, perhaps the most striking sign of climate change, may also provide economic opportunities," commented Reading's Dr Nathanael Melia.

"There is renewed interest in trans-Arctic shipping because of potentially reduced costs and journey times between Asia and the Atlantic. So far only a few commercial vessels have utilised these routes as they are not currently reliably open."

Sea-ice is in a committed, long-term decline as the polar north warms.

The traditional September minimum extent is about to be set in the coming days, and this year looks on course to be the second lowest in the satellite record.

Researchers do not see this trend being reversed anytime soon.

"If we experience a 2-degree increase in global temperatures, we will get close to an Arctic that is effectively ice-free for part of the year; that's less than a million sq km of ice cover," said Reading's Dr Ed Hawkins.

"So, even if future emissions are consistent with the Paris agreement, it will of course mean shipping routes will be more open. Not every year, but more regularly than they are now."

"Open water vessels won't be hugging the Russian coast quite so much, and ice-strengthened ships will be going right over the pole," he told BBC News.

Saving time

The incentives are clear: if vessels can transit the Arctic, they will shave many days off their journey times between the Pacific and North Atlantic ports, and save fuel.

In addition, by plotting a more central course, they can avoid the fees they would otherwise be charged for going through Siberian waters.

The team has been looking at how the opportunities might evolve in the decades ahead.

The group used five prominent climate computer models and essentially trained them to better reflect the distribution of Arctic sea-ice as seen in current observations.

They then ran those models forward through the century under different emissions scenarios, to gauge where and how frequently shipping routes would become navigable.

For European shipping companies currently moving cargo through the Suez canal to and from East Asia to Rotterdam, say, the average journey time tends to take a minimum of about 30 days.

But under a Paris-style future, an Arctic shortcut could shave this to 23 days by mid-century and 22 days by late century for non specialised vessels.

And under a high emissions scenario, these transit times come down further to 20 days by 2050 and 17 days by 2100.

The gains are not so great for North Atlantic ports, such as New York, because a route through the fabled North West Passage is not so much shorter than using the Panama Canal - but the Reading team still finds several days' advantage in going by way of the Arctic.

Another key finding from the research is the way the shipping season in the far north will extend as the period of low-ice conditions grows.

The team says that, for a high emissions scenario, trans-Arctic shipping could be potentially commonplace by late century, with navigable routes available even to open water vessels for perhaps 4-8 months a year.

For a low emissions scenario, where global temperatures are stabilised at less than 2 degrees above pre-industrial levels, the frequency with which open-water vessels can make the transits is much wider than today at 2-4 months.

The Reading scientists stress there will always be some sea-ice, especially in winter, and that year-to-year the conditions could be highly variable.

Shipping companies, they say, will weigh several factors before picking a route (e.g. fuel costs, weather, insurance, draft restrictions, cargo type, etc), and may well conclude on occasions that the time saved by going across the Arctic is still not worth it.

This will be especially so if they think there is a possibility of unprotected vessels running into free, fast-moving ice floes.

It is a point picked up by Rachel Tilling, who studies sea-ice using the Cryosat spacecraft. This European Space Agency mission produces quick-turn-around maps of floe thickness.

"Now there's evidence that Arctic shipping routes are opening, those wishing to use them will need to know how thick the ice is on a day-to-day basis. We provide this information through our near-real-time data service, which we launched to aid science and maritime activities in the Arctic," the University College of London researcher said.

A paper detailing the Reading study appears in Geophysical Research Letters.


http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-37286750
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