Register

Peak Oil is You


Donate Bitcoins ;-) or Paypal :-)


Page added on November 30, 2019

Bookmark and Share

Technological Change, Depletion, and the U.S. Petroleum Industry

Geology
A common claim in the nonrenewable resource literature is that improvements in technology may largely offset the effects of increasing scarcity over time. This study provides perhaps the first empirical evidence on this issue by analyzing the determinants of the average finding cost for additional petroleum reserves in the U.S. over the 1967-90 period. Using a new index of the level of technology, our analysis suggests that technological change played a major role in allaying what would otherwise have been a sharp rise in the average cost of finding additional reserves of natural gas. The impact of technological change on finding costs for U.S. crude oil reserves has been more modest.


13 Comments on "Technological Change, Depletion, and the U.S. Petroleum Industry"

  1. dave thompson on Sat, 30th Nov 2019 3:45 pm 

    Technology to the rescue!

  2. Richard Guenette on Sat, 30th Nov 2019 4:26 pm 

    Technology isn’t going to make life easier or better- not even for people who are addicted to smartphones or social media. Life is becoming nasty, brutal and short (suicide, substance abuse, wars, drug-resistant diseases etc.). By 2100, there will be zero people.

  3. Cloggie on Sun, 1st Dec 2019 7:22 am 

    Talking about technological change, Eindhoven is going to make a start with printing houses early next year. Here is a video impression of the technology in action:

    https://www.nu.nl/wonen/5992153/in-eindhoven-komen-de-eerste-3d-geprinte-huizen-van-nederland.html

    You can “build” almost any shape. The promise is less waste and more architectural degrees of freedom and more energy conservation.

    Location: Bosfazant, Meerhoven, Eindhoven, next to Eindhoven Airport:

    https://tinyurl.com/tjv5cmx

    This is how the first 5 homes are going to look like:

    https://www.ed.nl/eindhoven/eindhoven-krijgt-de-eerste-3d-geprinte-woningen~a2515d18/124392684/

  4. Cloggie on Sun, 1st Dec 2019 8:42 am 

    “A common claim in the nonrenewable resource literature is that improvements in technology may largely offset the effects of increasing scarcity over time.”

    Correct claim.

    It is even so true that we can even phase out non-renewable resources with it, perhaps not entirely to the taste of the authors of said nonrenewable resource literature, who intend to keep their chimney smoking with, well… not exactly hydrogen.

  5. Davy on Sun, 1st Dec 2019 9:01 am 

    “A common claim in the nonrenewable resource literature is that improvements in technology may largely offset the effects of increasing scarcity over time.”

    lmfao

    That’s proved out so far just perfect right TECHNO Power cloggo! Does your claim include a few more planets, oceans, and soil?

  6. Cloggie on Sun, 1st Dec 2019 9:47 am 

    More information (in English) about printed houses:

    https://www.3dprintedhouse.nl/en/project-info/

    “Building time”: ca 10 days per house.

    You need far less cement and hence you have less CO2 emissions. Voids can be filled with cheap insulation material. Holes for wiring and pipes are taken care off during the printing.

    This is the location they are going to build these 3D-printed homes:

    https://www.nieuwbouw-bosrijk.nl/

    These homes will NOT be connected to the gas grid and are designed to be energy-neutral.

    CNN took note as well:

    https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/3d-printed-houses-netherlands-style-intl/index.html

    The homes are constructed on the basis of a computer design.

  7. Cloggie on Sun, 1st Dec 2019 10:00 am 

    In Nantes, France a printed home is already occupied:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QbIJcK_a18

    An important argument for printed homes is the lack of skilled brick-layers. This home was built in less than 3 days and in the future a cost saving of 20% is expected as compared to traditional building:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWNaddnQBxM

  8. Cloggie on Sun, 1st Dec 2019 10:13 am 

    3D-printing coming to the third world, target price $4000,- for a simple home, the walls of which are built within 24 hours by a robot. Humans come in to add prefab windows, wiring and pipes. A prototype was already realized in Austin, Texas:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCzS2FZoB-I

    An unskilled supervisor merely needs to ensure that the robot doesn’t run out of cement, as it will continue to work 24/7, without striking. With this you can rapidly build entire residential areas, replacing your average shanty town in the third world, like this one in Soweto:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanty_town#/media/File:Soweto_township.jpg

    One Euro supervisor and tens of locals with a lot of time at their hands should suffice to get this to work.

    For this to work it is better that “Euro’s” don’t disappear from this planet, in the interest of holy third worlders.

    (Not that we are going to ask their permission).

  9. Cloggie on Tue, 3rd Dec 2019 2:00 am 

    Straight from Amsterdam, 9000 km solar-fueled, emission-free mobility per year at 30 kmh, or 30 km/day in a country like Spain or California, for €5,750

    https://cleantechnica.com/2019/12/02/squad-mobility-redefines-affordable-with-its-6300-solar-powered-urban-electric-vehicle/

    “Squad Mobility Redefines Affordable With Its $6,300 Solar-Powered Urban Electric Vehicle”

    It is created by two defectors from University of Eindhoven spin-off Lightyear:

    https://lightyear.one/

  10. Cloggie on Tue, 3rd Dec 2019 2:06 am 

    Everybody knows that metros and underground parking garages are warm. Reason: geothermal energy. You can perfectly exploit that:

    https://cleantechnica.com/2019/12/02/this-startup-wants-to-put-geothermal-panels-in-underground-garages-tunnels/

    “This Startup Wants To Put Geothermal Panels In Underground Garages & Tunnels”

    This Swiss company explains their invention:

    https://enerdrape.com/

  11. Davy on Tue, 3rd Dec 2019 5:21 am 

    “Straight from Amsterdam, 9000 km solar-fueled, emission-free mobility per year at 30 kmh, or 30 km/day in a country like Spain or California, for €5,750”

    A play toy. That is a waste of money. It is far better to put that money to better EV’s with charging stations.

  12. Cloggie on Tue, 3rd Dec 2019 3:05 pm 

    “A play toy. That is a waste of money.”

    Why? Any idea how bad the situation is in Asian cities? India? Average daily commuting distance is 30 km/day. This is better than your average stinking TukTuk, of which hundreds of thousands, if not millions, are in operation all over the third world:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auto_rickshaw#/media/File:Congestion_in_uyo.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auto_rickshaw

    This “toy” provides 9000 km autonomous, fossil fuel free transport, faster than a bike.

    You can’t walk for 6 hours to get to and from your work. You can sit in this “toy” for an hour though.

    With your plane and pickup you are a small-minded, entitled, hypocritical, fake green.

  13. Cloggie on Tue, 3rd Dec 2019 3:15 pm 

    The company sites talks about 45 kmh, not 30:

    https://www.squadmobility.com/

    No drivers license needed (“scooter”).

    In principle this buggy could be upgraded to 80 kmh. In the Netherlands the max. speed was recently downgraden from 130 to 100 kmh, for climate reasons.

    But degrowth is not for dave, just empty virtue signaling. He just wants to fantasize about global doom in his SUV pickup.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *