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Page added on May 19, 2019

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Helium is a finite resource—who knew?

Geology

Almost precisely 10 years ago I wrote about the likelihood of a shortage of helium in the not-to-distant future in a piece entitled “Let’s party ’til the helium’s gone.” Last week worries about a helium shortage appeared in my news feed. It seems that we are indeed going to party ’til the helium’s gone as no steps that I know of have been taken to avert the inevitable shortage.

That the shortage comes as a surprise results from a certain scientific illiteracy about the makeup of the universe and the geology of the planet. More on that later.

It also results from a peculiar type of economic thinking that is pervasive today that states that when shortages occur of any commodity, prices will rise to incentivize exploitation of previously uneconomical resources and automatically solve the problem. This intellectually lazy pronouncement does not consider whether the new supplies will be affordable. (As I pointed out in another piece about helium in 2013, “Things do not have to run out to become unavailable.”)

The same lazy, unreflective line of thought cited above also asserts that if we “run out” of a particular commodity (or it becomes unaffordable which is the same thing and more likely), we will always find substitutes precisely when we need them in quantities we require at prices we can afford.

As I pointed out in my piece 10 years ago, there are likely to be no comparable substitutes for helium because liquid helium allows for maintaining temperatures near absolute zero (−459.67 degree F). These temperatures are essential for certain industrial, medical and research processes.

Magnetic resonance imaging used in medical diagnosis depends on helium. Helium is especially useful for superconductivity applications and research. Superconductivity is the ability of a substance to carry far more electric current at very cold temperatures. Helium is also critical in the manufacture of silicon wafers which are central to modern electronics including computers and cellphones. Given these and other critical uses, one would think that governments would step in to restrict the use of helium for nonessential uses such as party balloons. But that would require a repudiation of the flawed thinking guiding most of our economic policy.

Returning now to the uncompromising universe and planet we inhabit, let’s review why the economic thinking cited above will not help us much with helium. First, helium is an element not a compound. It cannot be synthesized from other more abundant substances. Second, even though helium is the second most abundant element in the universe—hydrogen is the first—helium is exceedingly rare on Earth.

Helium is formed by the decay of radioactive elements in the Earth’s crust. The helium then begins an upward journey that most often ends as it leaves the Earth’s atmosphere and escapes into outer space. A small amount is trapped in natural gas reservoirs. Helium is separated from natural gas in a processing plant. But few natural gas reservoirs contain concentrations of helium high enough to make them economical to separate.

So, here is something that almost no one is discussing about helium supplies: Helium extraction will almost certainly peak when production from the natural gas reservoirs containing economical amounts of helium peaks. Most of the world’s helium currently comes from long-ago discovered natural gas fields in the United States which are nearer to the end of their production life than the beginning. Some comes from Qatar and Algeria, both large natural gas producers.

Unless new natural gas fields containing economical amounts of helium are found soon—or one company prospecting for economical deposits of helium mixed with non-hydrocarbon gases succeeds in a big way—helium supplies are likely to begin a long, irreversible decline. Keep in mind that no one prospects for natural gas in order to extract the helium from it. Thus natural gas production largely dictates what helium gets produced. I am therefore skeptical that either new source mentioned above will prove decisive in averting such a decline.

There are many other rare elements—such as indium, gallium and tantalum used in cellphones and other electronics—upon which our modern infrastructure depends. The emerging story of helium suggests that we will NOT always find substitutes precisely when we need them in quantities we require at prices we can afford for such critical and rare materials. And, we as a society have not figured out what it will mean when we don’t.

Resource Insights by Kurt Cobb



38 Comments on "Helium is a finite resource—who knew?"

  1. Antius on Sun, 19th May 2019 1:46 pm 

    Peak everything! Hydrogen can fulfil many of the roles of hydrogen. On the plus side, helium can be found in any void between basaltic or sedimentary rocks.

    Maybe in the future, we won’t use this valuable resource to fill party balloons?

  2. Go Speed Racer on Sun, 19th May 2019 5:18 pm 

    Greetings Ants on us, looks like the dumb
    stupid sheeple, will continue to fill
    up the balloons with helium. And the
    dumb stupid greedy selfish politicians,
    will allow them to do that.

    The stupidity of society about Helium,
    has been going on for so long,
    that its painful to listen to anymore.

    I once went in for an MRI (about 6 years ago)
    and they use the gigantic magnet and U have
    to lie down in the middle of the donut hole.

    And while I am in that room, I notice what
    looks like a good old fashioned wood-stove
    chimney, galvanized zinc, going out the top
    of this otherwise high-tech looking MRI
    magnet.

    So I ask the technician, why does this
    thing have a woodstove chimney on it.

    he says, “oh, that’s the stack where we
    vent the helium out the rooftop”.

    And I say, ‘gosh, shouldn’t that be recycled
    there is said to be a helium shortage, why
    would it simply be vented out the roof?’.

    And he says ‘dont know, don’t care, that
    is how the machine is setup, and I add
    the liquid helium to the magnet and it boils
    off and goes out that stack’.

    Well, I say, they are all dumb stupid
    retards, they could easily capture that
    helium and take it back to refrigeration
    and make it liquid again.

    So its not just the stupid fat cake-frosting
    eating pot-headed dipshits on welfare at
    their birthday cake party.

    It’s also the technical professionals who
    setup and operate MRI equipment.

    Pathetic. Stupid. Dumb. Fat. Lazy. Americans.

  3. Realtord on Mon, 20th May 2019 8:13 am 

    Pathetic. Stupid. Dumb. Fat. Lazy. American

  4. majece majece on Mon, 20th May 2019 8:33 am 

    In my opinion, on https://essayclick.net/blog/persuasive-essay you can learn a lot about persuasive essay writing. It will help you to get a high grade

  5. claes on Mon, 20th May 2019 2:26 pm 

    helium is a non replaceable commodity, and we should do our best to household with what we got of this uniqe material.

  6. kanon on Mon, 20th May 2019 6:44 pm 

    “. . . they could easily capture that
    helium and take it back to refrigeration
    and make it liquid again.” The article was clear that helium is a by-product of natural gas wells. Hopefully people realize that fossil fuel (and by-product) production must be consumed by any means necessary.

  7. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 2:59 am 

    Investor-friendly promo-video:

    https://www.geenstijl.nl/5147749/duitsers-bouwen-eerste-straalmotor-luchttaxi/

    We already knew that ze Germans are good at technology and jet engines in particular. And I have no doubt that they get this e-taxi to work eventually.

    But I hope not that we will end up with a sky full of these buzzers, where the roads are already congested with Audis and VWs.

    What we really need is push back over-mobility and create a national autonomous car robot by turning every road into a virtual railwayline, like this:

    https://youtu.be/y2X1ehdJQSI

    …and phase out private car ownership, relieve strained family budgets, get ugly parked cars out of the city and solve traffic congestion once and for all, and bring down operational and embeddedenergy requirements back to a minimum, by replacing 1 billion cars by 50-100 million comfortable on-demand e-vans, replacing time spent on staring at a rear bumper into quality time with your iPad.

    Now THAT is desirable German technology.

    Danke schoen!

  8. makati1 on Tue, 21st May 2019 3:27 am 

    Cloggie, I like your 1970’s techie dreams that never happened.

    https://spectrum.ieee.org/cars-that-think/transportation/self-driving/the-electronic-highway-of-1969

    We are no closer today than we were 50 years ago, but dream on.

    Tesla is proving why it will never happen. The insurance companies will never insure them. Therefore, they will die, like they did then.

    Besides, the infrastructure renovation costs are way out of the many debt loaded country’s means. They cannot even repair the roads they have. lol

  9. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 3:54 am 

    Makati, there is something called incubation time.

    Here are pictures from 1974, from the Philips electronics museum “The Evoluon” in my home town Eindhoven:

    https://youtu.be/D0IuV20wuJI

    They are showing pictures of the “phone of the future”, de beeldtelefoon. It didn’t happen as these Dutch techies imagined it would happen, because they didn’t anticipate tcp/ip packet-switching, the very technology you and I are using now to communicate world-wide.

    Today, the “beeldtelefoon” has materialized in the form of Skype, I use on a daily basis. Not to view Dutch or Indian male faces (males are not interested in viewing other male faces, certainly not male faces from a different tribe, only to share the desktop, powerpoint presentations, etc). The only faces you are interested in are your wife, girlfriend, kids and most of all your aging mum, if you still have her.

    The morale is: never say never when it comes to technology.

    Your reminder to failed autonomous driving dreams from the sixties do not count, because this is 2019, that comes with:

    – GPS or far better Galileo (cm accuracy)
    – 5G communication
    – ultrafast miniature mobile computing
    – a giant energy problem looming
    – a giant climate problem looming
    – a real giant car congestion problem
    – a looming declining per capita income problem

    All these points are screaming for autonomous driving solution.

    Perhaps we won’t get it to work in the city, but we most definately get it to work on roads outside the city, with predictable conditions.

  10. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 3:59 am 

    The Evoluon today. I visited it as a kid at least 15 times, it was a marvel of a technology museum, unparalleled in the world. Munich and London not even came close:

    https://youtu.be/CBpha2OOsOA

    Unfortunately the provincial town of Eindhoven of 200,000 could not generate sufficient visitors to keep it going economically and now it is a conference center.

    Terribly sad.

  11. makati1 on Tue, 21st May 2019 4:40 am 

    Cloggie, and there is such a thing as dreaming. While we may be closer to a technical ability, we are farther from a financial one. Much farther. Again an idea about 20-30 years too late. The next few years are going to see a lot of downgrading in BAU. The Western world is living on massive excessive debt. The East is also in debt, but still growing. Soon both will be in regression.

    You have to convince people that self-driving vehicles are safe. They are not. Hardly a week goes by that there is not an “accident”, or fire, caused by one somewhere. That is negative publicity that the public will remember. I would never get in one myself, or own one, even if I had the chance.

    Do you really believe that a billion plus people are going to give up their cars for a glorified bus. Do you think that all the millions of people who just bought new cars and will be paying for them for 6-7 years are going to be interested in your dream?

    The part of the world you live in is NOT typical of the rest of the world. Have you ever been in the US Mid-west? Do you realize that tens of millions of car owners that live there have to drive tens of miles to even a small town? It could be 100 miles between cities. I’ve been there. Done that. They will never be able to call a “cab”. Even buses are few.

    BTW: How do your dream cars manage when the GPS goes down? Maybe permanently? Or a sunflare EMP burns out all of the electronics? Just askin’.

  12. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 5:06 am 

    “The next few years are going to see a lot of downgrading in BAU. The Western world is living on massive excessive debt. The East is also in debt, but still growing. Soon both will be in regression.”

    You just delivered the best argument in favor of autonomous driving. Please let that sink in.

    50-100 million autonomous e-vans are far cheaper to maintain than one billion privately owned cars.

    Perfect means to gradually phase out privat car menace.

  13. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 5:15 am 

    “BTW: How do your dream cars manage when the GPS goes down? Maybe permanently? Or a sunflare EMP burns out all of the electronics? Just askin’.”

    Als de hemel naar beneden komt hebben we allemaal een blauwe hoed.

    Dutch proverb: if the skies come down, we all will be having a blue hat.

    We’re having an electronic society now for several decades. Sun flares could happen, like an earthquake, but that is no reason not to live in stone houses. Or have an electronic infrastructure.

    “The part of the world you live in is NOT typical of the rest of the world. Have you ever been in the US Mid-west? Do you realize that tens of millions of car owners that live there have to drive tens of miles to even a small town? It could be 100 miles between cities. I’ve been there. Done that. They will never be able to call a “cab”. Even buses are few.”

    Of course 48 seater busses are few. 6-seater on-demand vans are a far better match between demand and supply.

    But I agree, densely populated Holland, Switzerland, Denmark and Britain are better suited for early adoption.

  14. Antius on Tue, 21st May 2019 5:37 am 

    “We are no closer today than we were 50 years ago, but dream on.

    Tesla is proving why it will never happen. The insurance companies will never insure them. Therefore, they will die, like they did then.”

    I would point out that there is a compromise option that could achieve many of the benefits of autonomous vehicles, within the limits of present day technology: remote driving.

    https://www.wired.com/story/phantom-teleops/

    The same technology that allows human pilots to operate military drones from thousands of miles away, could also allow cars to be controlled by remote drivers.

    Benefits: (1) Allows short range vehicles to meet short distance journeys, which reduces the range requirements of vehicles. Only long-range vehicles need IC engines and even these could be hybrids. (2) Drivers would not need to travel far from home and could even work from home. Drivers could disengage from one car and start driving another at the flick of a switch; allowing a car to be driven remotely by many different drivers in a 24 hour period. A single journey could even be shared by different remote drivers if change over protocols can be developed. (3) It is a near-term solution that can make use of advanced auto-pilot as it develops and allows incremental transition. (4) Reduces the cost of vehicle ownership, without compromising privacy.

    Dis-benefits: You still need a human driver, along with the concomitant labour costs. On the plus side, labour can be deployed more flexibly and there is no need for the driver to be anywhere near the car that he is driving. So you still come out ahead.

  15. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 5:43 am 

    Makati, who is 10-15 year older than me, has witnessed the moonlanding, the rise of phones, television, computers, nuclear weapons, car economy, airplanes for Joe Sixpack, internet, etc., etc

    Compared to those, autonomous driving already largely works, but needs some extra tweaking for prime time.

    I hope he will witness this as well:

    https://www.spiegel.de/plus/quantencomputer-diese-maschine-wird-unser-leben-aendern-a-00000000-0002-0001-0000-000163955854

    Quantum computers are about to breakthrough, with a computational speed, millions of times faster than what we are seeing today. Will no doubt play a tole in further optimizing autonomous driving.

  16. makati1 on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:11 am 

    Cloggie, I don’t expect to see auto-drive vehicles in any regular use, for all of the reasons I gave above. Nor do I think it would be a good idea to even try. Waste of resources. Not enough build-out time.

    I appreciate your acknowledging my longer reference point. Few here understand what that means. When I was a kid, phones were attached to the walls, TV was new, ditto for computers, etc, as you enumerate. It has been a techie dream, but now the wake-up is coming.

    I watched so many commercials on “the future” I soon realized they were mostly bullshit to sell something else. Nuclear power plants were sold as “electric too cheap to meter” which was the excuse for the taxpayers to subsidize making materials for nuclear weapons. Most new commercial tech was military spinoffs to make more $$$.

    You have to excuse me if I have doubts about most “new” tech. I have a lot of experience with bullshit. If you are 60 or so, you and I will likely witness the end of life as we have known it, and it will not be in a good way. Our families are going to have a rougher ride than we did.

    If you read anything except techie manuals and advertising, you can see that we are fast approaching that SHTF event that will end BAU for all time. A great leveling around the world that will mostly bring greatest pain to the West. I hope I am wrong, but that is what I see before 2025. Use your obvious intelligence and skills to prepare for it is my suggestion to you and everyone else. Prepare for the worse and hope for the best.

  17. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:19 am 

    Since everybody has a drivers licence, you can even imagine shared driving where a passenger volunteers to drive the e-van, for instance from the city center to the highway, before he disappears behind his iPad.

    Now that’s a revolutionary thought.lol

  18. I AM THE MOB on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:48 am 

    Clogg

    Waymo CEO: Autonomous cars won’t ever be able to drive in all conditions
    https://www.cnet.com/news/alphabet-google-waymo-ceo-john-krafcik-autonomous-cars-wont-ever-be-able-to-drive-in-all-conditions/

    Driverless cars dont work in rain, snow or fog..And can’t make left turns..

    Epic fail..Just like 3D television and Google Glass and the flying car!

    LOL

  19. Davy on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:52 am 

    “phase out private car ownership, relieve strained family budgets, get ugly parked cars out of the city and solve traffic congestion once and for all, and bring down operational and embeddedenergy requirements back to a minimum, by replacing 1 billion cars by 50-100 million comfortable on-demand e-vans, replacing time spent on staring at a rear bumper into quality time with your iPad.”

    This is not a valid plan except in small regions. Globally it will be ICE vehicles and most will be private single occupancy that is until a hard decline begins. Then we might see adaptations but not with more expensive AI EV’s for example. We will see multiple people packing into vehicles to save money. In the US we have big trucks that can function like buses. A 1ton flatbed dully can haul 15 cows with a gooseneck trailer. So picture 40 person transport vehicle for little money. It will be these hybrid/salvage arrangements that will happen by industrious people once a hard decline sets in. In the meantime there will be an EV transformation in some areas which is good actually. We need resilience and electric transport will help. If we can avoid destroying what is left of the global economy we might build out much more renewables and EV’s. These markets are hot right now. 1BIL ICE vehicle stock will not be replaced by 100MIL AI E-vans. Not going to happen. This is more techno optimism.

  20. Antius on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:52 am 

    “Since everybody has a drivers licence, you can even imagine shared driving where a passenger volunteers to drive the e-van, for instance from the city center to the highway, before he disappears behind his iPad.”

    Indeed. In the beginning, many customers may not feel comfortable in a remotely controlled car without dual controls. Ultimately, there would be pressure to phase it out, given the extra weight and space requirements associated with manual drive capability.

    I am uneasy with the idea of remote control (and autonomous) vehicles. Not because I doubt the practicality of the concept (the technology for the former already exists), but because of what it implies in terms of the erosion of individual privacy against the prying eyes of the state and corporate forces. This is an increasingly grim fact of life. As you know, I do not trust governments. The more power they have to survey individual activity, the more enslaved we all become.

  21. Davy on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:57 am 

    “I would point out that there is a compromise option that could achieve many of the benefits of autonomous vehicles, within the limits of present day technology: remote driving.”

    That is more plausible especially in areas that have the infrastructure. We will soon have areas of 5G cell reception and this will go a long way to powering remote driving if we get to that.

  22. Antius on Tue, 21st May 2019 7:01 am 

    “Driverless cars dont work in rain, snow or fog..And can’t make left turns..

    Epic fail..Just like 3D television and Google Glass and the flying car!”

    You assume too much. If cars can be controlled by drivers at remote locations, then they don’t need to be entirely autonomous. The autonomous function is there to assist and reduce the burden on the driver, not to replace him entirely.

    The problems with autonomous vehicles are not technological, they are societal. Would you trust someone to drive you when they weren’t even in the car? Would they ever be quite so careful when it came to protecting you from a crash, if they were seated safe and sound 1000 miles away? Would you trust the taxi operator to protect your privacy when the government ‘requests’ information on your movements in the past 12 months? For me, these are bigger issues than the practicality of the technology. Having lived in Britain most of my life, I have no trust in the moral integrity of governments.

  23. Davy on Tue, 21st May 2019 7:06 am 

    “I am uneasy with the idea of remote control (and autonomous) vehicles. Not because I doubt the practicality of the concept (the technology for the former already exists), but because of what it implies in terms of the erosion of individual privacy”
    I was thinking more in terms of E-Vans than private vehicles. We could go a long way with remotely driven E-vans in some locations especially if they were promoted. Their value is evident with conservation, lower emissions, and less congestion. It is just a matter of behavioral changes. They are a potential way to leap frog mass transit that is so costly these days especially in suburban areas with lower population densities.

    “against the prying eyes of the state and corporate forces. This is an increasingly grim fact of life. As you know, I do not trust governments. The more power they have to survey individual activity, the more enslaved we all become.”
    These forces are facing decline too. The only reason they have become so powerful recently has been massive affluence in the tech sectors from dropping costs and the concentration of power to rich areas. This will change as the world faces a hard decline. These forces will be more reactive than proactive in the future because of failing networks. They will consolidate into quasi-gated areas so to speak where power is maintained but is limited to areas under control. In other areas lower tech and more freedom might occur but with the potential for more lawlessness. Hard to say what is ahead immediately but further out you go the more likely decline based situations will occur.

  24. I AM THE MOB on Tue, 21st May 2019 7:31 am 

    Antius

    Just wait till some alt right neckbeard living in his moms basement figures out how to hack a driverless car and drives grandma into a tree..And then brags about it on 4chan..

    LOL

  25. Antius on Tue, 21st May 2019 8:11 am 

    “Antius
    Just wait till some alt right neckbeard living in his moms basement figures out how to hack a driverless car and drives grandma into a tree..And then brags about it on 4chan..”

    Hacking is always a risk with remotely operated systems. The control signal must be encrypted, such that the risk of accident caused by hacking is small and tolerable. It must also be transmitted across multiple bands, to minimise the risk of interference. It the event of loss of signal, the vehicle must be programmed to stop.

    A necessary safety feature for any remotely operated vehicle would be anonymity between the passenger and driver. The driver should never know who the passenger is, but for any particular trip, the taxi company will always know who the driver is.

  26. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 8:32 am 

    “Just wait till some alt right neckbeard living in his moms basement figures out how to hack a driverless car and drives grandma into a tree..And then brags about it on 4chan..
    LOL”

    You have exceptionally low insight into the motivations of “alt-right neck beards”. Hurting grandma’s is a non-existing motivation. If however said neckbeard would figure out that the van would contain one or more antifa clowns like you as cargo, slamming that van against a concrete wall at 120 mph turning you into beta quality filet Americain, would be one of the more milder final solutions.

    Hope this helps.

  27. I AM THE MOB on Tue, 21st May 2019 10:46 am 

    Clog

    Dont worry, you don’t even need to hack..They crash and kill people on their own.

    Tesla: Autopilot was on during deadly Mountain View crash
    https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/03/30/tesla-autopilot-was-on-during-deadly-mountain-view-crash/

    Self-driving Uber kills Arizona woman in first fatal crash
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/mar/19/uber-self-driving-car-kills-woman-arizona-tempe

    The “Self-Driving Car” is Only an Oxymoron
    http://www.dailyimpact.net/2017/08/03/the-self-driving-car-is-only-an-oxymoron/

    Consumers Don’t Really Want Self-Driving Cars, MIT Study Finds
    http://agelab.mit.edu/news/consumers-dont-really-want-self-driving-cars-mit-study-finds

    You are as dumb as they come..

  28. peakyeast on Tue, 21st May 2019 3:33 pm 

    I can only speak for myself, but I would prefer an autonomous car – of course I would like to maintain the possibility of personal control. But the cars electronics should be independent of outside communications and not be a spying device for google,facebook et al.

    Self-driving cars do not have to have a perfect record – just better than a good human. There must be a realization that there is no such thing as perfection.

    And, of course, they will solve bad weather conditions and so on to at least the same degree as a human and possibly soon.

  29. Anonymouse on Tue, 21st May 2019 3:45 pm 

    Is the article about helium-as-a-finite resource, or cloggedrectum’s robo-car fantasy?

  30. I AM THE MOB on Tue, 21st May 2019 4:58 pm 

    peakyeast

    I want a driverless car to bring your daughter to my house..So I can breed her!

    lol

  31. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 5:15 pm 

    “I want a driverless car to bring your daughter to my house..So I can breed her!”

    https://images.app.goo.gl/xMt7vJk7uNEcgFTo8

  32. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 5:33 pm 

    https://www.telegraaf.nl/nieuws/3140251/nederland-klaar-voor-zelfrijdende-auto-we-zijn-beste-voorbereid

    “Nederland klaar voor zelfrijdende auto: ‘We zijn beste voorbereid’”

    KPMG: Netherlands ready for self-driving car. We’re the best prepared.

    https://home.kpmg/xx/en/home/insights/2019/02/2019-autonomous-vehicles-readiness-index.html

    Once again, The Netherlands ranked #1. Notably, it is working with neighboring countries to launch huge platoons of driverless trucks to transport flowers on major “Tulip Corridor” routes from Amsterdam to Antwerp and Rotterdam to the Ruhr valley.

    Meanwhile in anonymouse Toronto:

    https://globalnews.ca/news/3748748/rising-concerns-over-literacy-rates-in-canada/

    “Rising concerns over literacy rates in Canada”

    Of course Toronto is as dead as a brick as far as the self-driving car is concerned. The city has been taken over by the likes of anonymouse and could as well been written off.

    Large parts of North-America will fall in our hands. All we need to do is patiently wait until mobster and shithole country dave have sufficiently destroyed the place for us.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/eurocanadians

  33. Davy on Tue, 21st May 2019 5:41 pm 

    “Large parts of North-America will fall in our hands. All we need to do is patiently wait until mobster and shithole country dave have sufficiently destroyed the place for us.”

    cloggo, you got your own postage stamp country to worry about. We don’t want you around here. If you come around we will hand you your ass.

  34. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 5:55 pm 

    “We don’t want you around here. If you come around we will hand you your ass.”

    We don’t want you either (in Italy). Your future is in the Amazonas. There you can live a stone age life with goats and a wooden penis shaft. Anonymouse can teach you how to make one. He knows these kind of things.

  35. Cloggie on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:01 pm 

    Our man in America:

    https://youtu.be/dvOn4LRm9l0

    All we are asking for is 120 million white Americans for PBM, a few tens of millions in New England and Anglo-Canada for the English and Quebec for France. That’s it.

    That’s not too much to ask!?

  36. Davy on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:05 pm 

    “We don’t want you either (in Italy).”

    cloggo, I am here in MO. You stay in your nederland and everything will be fine.

  37. Anonymouse on Tue, 21st May 2019 6:29 pm 

    Cloggedsphincter will staying in his judenland dumbass. No need for you worry your widdle head over that. You and your goats, are, mostly….safe from koshercloggs and his tribes greedy little claws.

    How do I know this? No one has a working flying autonomous electric robo car(with wheelchair access). Until those actually exist, or something resembling it is available, AND at price that is cheap enough even a jew like cloggedAnus will buy into one (sure lol), totally safe. IOW, he is very much like jew, I mean, you, exceptionalturd, all talk and no action.

    See, nothing to worry about.

  38. Cloggie on Wed, 22nd May 2019 2:02 am 

    Fortress Europe is a reality. Only a few thousand “refugees” made it to Germany between 2017-2019.

    Italy and the Balkans have hermetically sealed off the influx of illegal immigrants. The nightmare is over.

    https://www.spiegel.de/politik/deutschland/fluechtlinge-immer-weniger-angehoerige-kommen-nach-deutschland-a-1268631.html

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