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Page added on December 22, 2018

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America’s Oil And Gas Reserves Double With Massive New Permian Discovery

Geology

America’s energy security just got a lot more secure. On November 28 The United States Geological Survey (USGS) published an assessment of continuous (unconventional or ‘tight’) resources in a part of the prolific Permian oil and gas basin that straddles Western Texas and Southeastern New Mexico. Located in the Wolfcamp Shale and overlying Bone Spring Formation, the unproven, technically recoverable reserves are officially the largest on the planet. But curiously this story isn’t making waves in the mainstream media.

Nearly one third of the United States’ crude already comes from the Permian, making it the largest shale-oil producing region in the country. While numerous studies have been conducted on the Permian’s half-dozen sub-basins and their many overlapping formations, this represents the first comprehensives USGS assessment of continuous resources in Wolfcamp and Bone Spring within the Delaware Basin.

And the findings are truly incredible.

The USGS estimates that over 46 billion barrels of oil, 280 trillion cubic feet of gas, and 20 billion barrels of natural gas liquids are trapped in these low-permeability shale formations. To better understand just how staggering these numbers are, think about this: at the end of 2017, total U.S. proven reserves of crude oil hovered around 40 billion barrels. For natural gas, figures stood around 465 trillion cubic feet (tcf). The new upward revision of Permian resources represents a more than 100% and 65% increase in U.S. oil and gas reserves, respectively, if they can be extracted economically.

It is important to note that the recent USGS survey includes estimates for unproven reserves (estimated resources based on geologic knowledge and theory) and technically recoverable reserves (resources available using current technology and industry practices). While reasonable conclusions can be drawn about the extent of resources in these basins, the approximations do not address future economic profitability. The future prices of hydrocarbons and their economic viability may vary due to environmental regulation, technology, specific geology, and cost of production. But don’t let that detract from the scale of this find.

Historic U.S. proven oil and gas reservesEIA

Here’s another way to look at it: the world consumes approximately 100 million barrels of oil and .36 trillion cubic feet of natural gas per day. This means that Wolfcamp and Bone Spring have sufficient reserves to meet global oil demand for over a year, and gas demand for several more. Not bad for a country that, up until early 2015, banned the export of crude oil for fear of running out of domestic supplies.

Still not impressed?

At $50 dollars per barrel (where West Texas Intermediate (WTI) is currently trading following a 35% price drop since October) the Wolfcamp Shale and Bone Spring Formation would be worth a whopping  $2.3 trillion. As for natural gas, 280 trillion cubic feet will fetch you $1.1 trillion at today’s prices of $3.75 per million Btu (mmbtu).  It won’t solve the national debt problem – which is now nearly $22 trillion – but windfall taxes for the companies operating in these basins (not including the taxes along every step of the oil and gas value chain) would be a boon for state, local, and the national economy. Tax revenues from this mass reserve could help fund our schools, social security, critical infrastructure, and national defense. This is very literally buried treasure.

But unlike your typical buried treasure, the hard part isn’t just finding this stuff, it’s moving it.

The United States is currently suffering from a major mid-stream infrastructure bottleneck, meaning the country lacks sufficient pipeline capacity to move all the oil and gas we are extracting to willing buyers.

Shale producers in the Permian, for example, have some 300,000 barrels per day to ship, but are unable to do so. The capacity situation is so bad that for a brief period in November, natural gas prices in the Permian Waha hub actually dropped into the negatives, forcing gas traders to pay customers to take their product. Relief is expected to come by 2020, when a host of massive pipelines and railroad projects are due to be completed. Energy Trading Partners (NYSE:EPT-D), Phillips 66 Partners (NYSE:PSXP) and Andeavor (NYSE:ANDV) are among those companies pouring billions into the Permian’s high-demand mid-stream sector. One would hope that overzealous regulators and judges not stand in their way.

Base Map showing the Delaware Basin, Permian Basin Province, New Mexico and Texas, and the extent of the two
Wolfcamp shale-gas continuous assessment units (AU)USGS

But in the short term, the landscape does not look promising for energy investors on any side of the oil and gas equation. Return to the ‘lower for longer’ energy price environment, an impending global recession, higher interest rates, a global oil production glut, and weak demand – particularly from emerging markets – paint a bleak picture.  The promised  OPEC and friends 1.2 million barrel per day cut isn’t likely to help much, as this would just remove around 1% of global supply. Considering the lag time for any such cut to take effect, plus the tendency of OPEC+ producers to cheat, we shouldn’t expect an appreciable increase in oil prices any time soon.

The future of the Wolfcamp and Bone Spring treasure will be contingent on the direction of global oil markets and the North American natural gas demand, but it is good to know that the country can breathe easier if global instability threatens imports. The state of the Union’s oil and gas stocks is bright.

Forbes



39 Comments on "America’s Oil And Gas Reserves Double With Massive New Permian Discovery"

  1. Cloggie on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 11:59 am 

    Can we please finally lay this peak-oil-supply-now baloney to rest?

    And concentrate how we can arrive at peak-oil-demand at the earliest opportunity?

    Thanks.

  2. Cloggie on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 2:32 pm 

    It’s official, skating on Mars is possible:

    https://www.rt.com/news/447139-mars-water-ice-images-esa/

  3. Go Speed Racer on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 2:33 pm 

    Yeeee Hawwww.
    It’s the new America!
    Put on some shorts sunglasses
    and sandals
    drive my Chevy convertible
    to the drive-in, enjoy some
    “Beach Boys” and burger & fries.
    in the month of January !!!

  4. Go Speed Racer on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 2:40 pm 

    Out here in the North latitudes of USA,
    I got these big bad woodpecker birds,
    sitting on my drain pipe and trying to peck
    their way into my atttic. I shoot wasp spray
    at then to make them go away.

    But here is the point. It’s bad news for global
    warming deniers. There didn’t used to be any
    “nesting birds” trying to make a home in my attic,
    at Christmas. Used to have snow at Christmas.

    I don’t even need to put on faucet covers. It’s always
    above freezing. It used to be damn cold with 2 feet
    of snow on the roof. Now it’s 50F at Christmas.

    To make America Great Again, maybe Trump could
    sell us fake plastic snow in big bags. Shake it out
    in the yard.

  5. Spoonman on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 3:42 pm 

    Forbes = pimp for the oil industry
    Looking for more sucker investors

  6. Cloggie on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 3:55 pm 

    “Forbes = pimp for the oil industry
    Looking for more sucker investors”

    They merely report what the USGS says.

  7. Antius on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 8:57 pm 

    “unproven, technically recoverable reserves are officially the largest on the planet. But curiously this story isn’t making waves in the mainstream media.”

    “It is important to note that the recent USGS survey includes estimates for unproven reserves (estimated resources based on geologic knowledge and theory) and technically recoverable reserves (resources available using current technology and industry practices)”

    I am a little confused. Are these resources that are known to exist or not? If the estimates are close to correct, then 46bn barrels of light oils is significant – about 500 days of global oil production, but not really significant enough to change the global depletion picture.

    The problem that is often overlooked is that shale oil is extremely light. Refining it produces plenty of gasoline and LPG but not much diesel. And diesel is the fuel that runs the global economy. Tight Shale oil is therefore much less valuable to refiners. Hence the rush to export it to the rest of the world. Claims that shale derived tight oil will relieve American energy supply problems are therefore dubious at best, given that gasoline consumption is dominated by small cars and light trucks. Maybe other big users like trucks can be modified to run on gasoline?

  8. Antius on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 9:11 pm 

    “Can we please finally lay this peak-oil-supply-now baloney to rest?”

    You fail to learn from new information Cloggie and ignore things that you don’t want to hear. It severely undermines you.

    We have been over the EROI / ECOE net energy problem enough times before. It is largely responsible for the financial dire straights that the world is in.

    https://srsroccoreport.com/has-peak-diesel-arrived-the-data-doesnt-look-good/

    Tight oil is both more expensive to produce and less valuable as a product than oil from more conventional plays. Increasingly, unconventional oil production is failing to make up losses in conventional reserves. This is reflected in the production of products, with diesel and fuel oil now apparently several years past peak.

  9. Antius on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 9:34 pm 

    “It’s official, skating on Mars is possible”

    Interesting discovery. Whilst the atmospheric pressure on Mars is <1% of Earth sea level, it may be possible for future colonies to live underwater. At a depth of 26m, pressure would be equivelent to Earth sea level. With a sufficient heat source to melt the ice, and a plastic shield dome to prevent dust contamination; human colonists could live and grow food in deep ponds.

    I still think that tge moon is a better near term target in spite of its poorer resources. It is only 3 days away and is much more conveniently located for shipping materials into Earth orbit. And Earth orbit is where the money is to be made.

  10. Anonymouse on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 10:27 pm 

    Cloggiefraud can give you a lift to the moon in his solar-powered flying robo-car, dumbAnt. He bought the moon-ready add-on package, and its got…a moon-roof, imagine that! And is he is glad he spent the extra money. You see, normally, him and other members of his ‘tribe’ are very, how shall we put it…spendthrift?….frugal even, when it comes to spending money. But when it comes to moon-commuting, even a cloggenyid knows enough to spare no expense.

    Anyhow, you can both visit Alex Jones moon bunker. He might even let you sit in the chair in the studio he uses to beam his ‘anti-NWO’ broadcasts to all his dumbass supporters and sycophants back on Earth.

    So go for a moon run with him. Clogged sphincter needs to get out of nursing home anyhow. Really he does.

  11. Antius on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 10:50 pm 

    “But when it comes to moon-commuting, even a cloggenyid knows enough to spare no expense”

    Anonymous, don’t you ever get tired of talking shite? To conclude that Cloggie is a Yid would require ignoring practically everything that he writes.

    As for space based activities, it is already big business. Satellites are already essential to global communications, mapping and military intelligence. The question is, will the recent large cost reductions in rocketry allow space based activities to progress to a new level, namely large scale space resource utilisation?

  12. Antius on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 11:28 pm 

    This is very telling.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/inline-images/yir2018-image012.jpg?itok=KpX4KLFn

    Practically all of Americas growth now results from the simple recycling of borrowed money. Without this effect, the economy would have contracted since 2009.

  13. makati1 on Sat, 22nd Dec 2018 11:45 pm 

    Antius, only Russia and China can afford space vehicles. The US is so far behind the curve that it will never catch up. When the shuttles wore out, that ended American space flight. Now Americans cannot even build a decent battleship or airplane.

  14. Go Speed Racer on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 4:50 am 

    There is so much global warming that
    CO2 levels on Mars have risen.

    Due to increasing temperatures on Mars
    from the greenhouse effect, soon the
    ice in the crater won’t be there anymore.

  15. Mick on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 5:32 am 

    Hey gsr how’s the sofa and recliner burning business going? Still waiting on a invite to one of your fireworks and tyre Bon fire nights I’ll bring the ammo this time .

  16. Cloggie on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 5:32 am 

    We have been over the EROI / ECOE net energy problem enough times before. It is largely responsible for the financial dire straights that the world is in.

    I deny that EROI is responsible for financial dire. Financial dire is the consequence of irresponsible lack of discipline among major parties around the world (except the EU that does manage to bring debt down, Germany for instance 2.3% last year and persuaded Italy to tone down its demands).

    EROI may have been declined somewhat, now that it is more difficult to dig up combustible material, at the same time technology is progressing at breakneck speed. With the same kWh you can do so much more than 10-20 years ago.

    The solid Bosch fridge I had before had 195 kWh/year. My current Liebherr fridge has 60 kWh.

    I began my driving career with a Volvo 240, that consumed 1 liter lpg on 6 kilometer. My previous car an Audi-2 ran 1 liter diesel on 30 kilometer.

    Oldschool 60-150W lightbulbs have all been replaced by 6-15W LED-lights.

    The list goes on and on.

    The very fact that the US car industry no longer produces ordinary “European-style” sedan cars, but SUVs only, is a clear proof that EROI can’t be that much of a problem.

    Yes, it is possible that the entire western financial edifice will come crashing down. Will have nothing to do with EROI. The Wallstreet crash of 1929 had arguably little to do with EROI, where the cheap oil age was in its early stages. The early Greek philosophers tried to explain the universe from one basic principle: air, water, etc. Likewise, Charles Hall tries to explain civilization from EROI, claiming that you can’t have great art below EROI 15. In my view, pointing at Greece, Rome, Baroque, Renaissance, Dutch painting, etc., etc., it is best to have no fossil fuel at all at your disposal in order to arrive at great art… or civilization.lol

    I’m not going to link yet again to these 23 trillion ton of coal under the North Sea. But messages like in this lead article confirms me that running out of combustible material is not our problem. The technological methods we have at our disposal to turn even the greatest fossil dregs into something useful are so immense, that I can’t be bothered anymore with worrying about “peak oil supply”.

    In fact I stopped worrying about that by the end of 2012. The biosphere and climate and overpopulation, those are the real problems. A good solid economic downturn & financial crash could work wonders, something politicians won’t be able to push through. Let’s have it before all 1.3 billion Chinese come to Europe as tourists.

    https://www.traveller24.com/Explore/International-Getaways/watch-well-off-chinese-travellers-are-a-little-too-obsessed-with-this-austrian-town-20181124

  17. Mick on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 5:49 am 

    Come on cloggy do expect us to read that drivel. I didn’t get past the first few words . I think it’s time you hung up the clogs and retired to the windmill

  18. TheNationalist on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 6:00 am 

    Well it looks like we are all gonna cook now! Bugger climate change the important thing is at least the Chinks will get to know the unbeatable joy of a 6.4 litre SUV to drive to shops to buy a loaf of bread!
    For a moment there I was worried.

  19. Cloggie on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 6:46 am 

    Come on cloggy do expect us to read that drivel. I didn’t get past the first few words . I think it’s time you hung up the clogs and retired to the windmill

    Zero substance, sneer-only.

    Some day though you will become serious people, I am sure of that. It’s a matter of proper guidance.

  20. Nostradamus on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 9:30 am 

    48 billion barrels. That’s enough to supply the USA for 7 years.

  21. shortonoil on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 9:57 am 

    “Still not impressed?”

    Hardly:

    There is nothing impressive about a field with a GOR of 597:1. The Permian is just another Shale field with a 5 year decline rate of 90%. The drilling rate will have to increase exponentially to keep it under production. An exponentially increasing cost is hardly a recipe for a long term success story!

    Clog is just another overly, euphoric optimist living in a dying culture, with a dying economy. Grasping at straws is a reflex response.

  22. Antius on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 4:22 pm 

    “I deny that EROI is responsible for financial dire. Financial dire is the consequence of irresponsible lack of discipline among major parties around the world (except the EU that does manage to bring debt down, Germany for instance 2.3% last year and persuaded Italy to tone down its demands).”

    Since 2008, global debt and money supply have inflated much more rapidly than GDP. The ECB has had one of the largest quantitative easing programmes in the world. This cannot be explained by financial irresponsibility. It is what central banks needed to do simply to maintain modest levels of growth by recycling borrowed money. What do you think the problem could be? Ask yourself, what sort of economy needs to price credit beneath inflation?

    The problem is easy to understand when you appreciate that the economy is a collection of energy processes. We use energy to modify and transport matter, i.e. to carry out physical work. That is the physical basis of GDP, because it is the basis of the products and services that we value. If more and more resources need to be invested to gather the physical resources needed to accomplish this (especially energy) then economic growth becomes harder and ultimately impossible to achieve.

    Technology is often misunderstood. It is really just another word for complexity. By adding better technology, we can expand resource bases, but we cannot change the nature of resources. Hence, technology allows us to work around limitations, to a limited degree. Hence, we can access new resources like shale oil. But the extraction process is still resource intensive and shale oil is composed of light hydrocarbons that are generally less useful to us. The lower EROI implies a higher breakeven cost for a less valuable resource. Technology has allowed us to access the material, but has not changed what it is. The same problem would occur if you attempted to harvest subsea coal. You would be investing large amounts of infrastructure to harvest low energy density syngas. It isn’t that these things are impossible to do. They are simply much less profitable to do compared to yesterdays hydrocarbons.

    It is no coincidence that real prosperity across the globe reached a glass ceiling
    just as conventional oil and gas production reached peak. Both problems arrived at the same time. If you believe that the two are unrelated, then you must also believe that the human economy is a perpetual motion machine, unrestrained by the laws of physics.

  23. makati1 on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 5:49 pm 

    short, I agree. This is another “upper” for the debt serfs to try to prove that the US is oil independent. Fraking, so far, has been a losing business. When the SHTF, it will end.

  24. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 23rd Dec 2018 6:15 pm 

    The Collapse of Civilization Manifesto

    https://medium.com/@Cliffhanger1983/the-collapse-of-civilization-manifesto-2039c6a5327

    The most frightening compendium you will ever read.

  25. Davy on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 4:30 am 

    “The Future Of Artificial Intelligence In Oil & Gas”
    https://tinyurl.com/y8cdy4gb

    “First of all, it needs to be said that a lot of the people who talk about AI enthusiastically do not mean artificial intelligence literally, as in an autonomous system capable of making decisions on its own. What they most commonly mean is predictive and analytic algorithms, and the process that allows for the deployment in a huge variety of tasks in the upstream industry: machine learning. While the hype is considerable, it’s not all without merit. The co-founder and chief executive of oiltech statup OilX, Florian Thaler, told Oilprice that “amidst the general hype, there is indeed an epochal shift: the current exponential growth in oil data from sensors and satellite is unprecedented and is not showing any signs of slowing down.”

    “machine learning can be deployed in more than one area of the industry. In the field, for example, it can help oil and gas producers see how a well’s yield will change over time. “We have a lot of data points and we assume that if the well has produced long enough it will behave as other wells have performed in the past… A neural network is a way that allows us to do this in some way,”

    “This makes perfect sense, of course: the more historical data you have, the more accurate predictions for future well performance you could make, especially if you have the help of algorithms. And these algorithms are now so sophisticated, according to Ramos-Peon, that “You just throw all of this data to the computer and it will train itself somehow to guess the best value so the accuracy is as high as possible.”

  26. Davy on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 5:01 am 

    Gail talks down renewables.

    “Electricity won’t save us from our oil problems”
    https://tinyurl.com/ycezy4pn

    “Intermittent wind and solar cannot stand on their own. They also cannot scale up to the necessary level in the required time period. Instead, the way they are added to the grid artificially depresses wholesale electricity prices, driving other forms of generation out of business. While intermittent wind and solar may sound sustainable, the way that they are added to the electric grid tends to push the overall electrical system toward collapse. They act like parasites on the system.”

    “the subsidies for intermittent wind and solar discourage other innovation because they lead to terribly low wholesale prices for innovators to compete against, particularly in areas where hour by hour competitive rating is done. The ultimate problem is that if one type of electricity production is subsidized (even if in subtle ways), all electricity producers must be subsidized. Governments cannot possibly afford such widespread subsidies.”

  27. Davy on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 5:31 am 

    “Ten charts show how the world is progressing on clean energy”
    https://tinyurl.com/ybk3acu5

    carbon intensity of electricity
    (graph) https://tinyurl.com/yckbea4q

    change in carbon intensity of electricity
    https://tinyurl.com/y8hk8ybw

    The installed capacity of wind power
    https://tinyurl.com/y7uys2tw

    The number of electric vehicles on the roads
    https://tinyurl.com/y9a46vzj

    The share of electric vehicles (both battery and plug-in hybrid) within new car sales
    https://tinyurl.com/y9tbglcv

    The energy consumed per person for transportation of people and goods
    https://tinyurl.com/yc6jxz55

    The change in energy consumed per person for transportation of people and goods over the last decade
    https://tinyurl.com/y9oosjh8

    The change in energy consumed for heating and powering households over the last decade
    https://tinyurl.com/y7raws8h

  28. Cloggie on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 5:56 am 

    Gail talks down renewables.

    Oh-noos, the cause of renewables has been obliterated, ruined!

    I recently gave a talk to a group of IEEE electricity researchers (primarily engineers) about the current energy situation and how welcoming it is for new technologies. Needless to say, this group did not come with the standard mindset. They wanted to understand what the electricity situation really is.

    Hookay, a load of IEEE electricity professionals listening to what an accountant has to say about electricity. Right. Did you get an applause, Gail?

    In order for intermittent wind and solar to truly be dispatchable, the way other electricity providers are, there needs to be long-term storage for intermittent providers. A big part of the problem is seasonal matching of generation.

    Is that so. Here a US study of people who DO know what they are talking about (NREL), who conclude:

    https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy17osti/68960.pdf

    Overall, our results suggest that relatively short-duration energy storage might offer an effective path to reduce VG curtailments at penetrations up to 55%. Across all the mixes of wind and solar resources analyzed, at least half of the potential avoided-curtailment benefits are realized with 8 hours of storage, and the first 4 hours provide the largest benefit. At VG penetrations up to 55%, there appears to be little incremental benefit in deploying very-long-duration or seasonal storage.

    So, for 55% renewable electricity penetration you only need 4 hours of storage (pumped hydro storage with 80% efficiency is fine). Let’s build in the coming 1-2 decades that 55% capacity first, shall we and worry about the remaining 45% later, when storage technology matures (hydrogen/ammonia or metals).

    Here are the world’s premier renewable energy experts, the German Fraunhofer institute, who calculated that you can very well have a 90-100% renewable energy system at the same cost as our current fossil-based system:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/09/16/blueprint-100-renewable-energy-base-for-germany/

    A post by Roger Andrews gives an idea of what the cost of the battery backup needed to solve this seasonal matching problem would be.

    Nobody in his right mind would ever suggest to even out renewable intermittency with batteries. Batteries, that’s for cars or for the grid for a couple of hours. In the Fraunhofer study in contrast hydrogen is used for longer term storage (alternatively metal powders could be used as a fuel, like iron).

    For space heating you can use solutions like this, together with electric heat pumps:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2018/07/03/ecovat-seasonal-storage/

    I’m sick and tired of blundering amateurs like Heinberg, Gail and Alice Friedman and their sensationalist messages getting so much attention, where the real experts are doing real work to get the problem solved. And will get the job done.

  29. Davy on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 6:45 am 

    I was pretty sure that would stir you up neder. I see the issue as somewhere between both extremes. I am pro renewables but in a realistic platform of lets transform the grid not pretend we can transition. My belief is behavior not technology that needs to lead this transformation. We can make a global declining economy less bad if with include renewables. There appears to be little chance we will decarbonize in time and further climate change is now increasingly proceeding through non-human change. Several here have thrown plenty of cold water on your sensationalized optimism.

    “So, for 55% renewable electricity penetration you only need 4 hours of storage (pumped hydro storage with 80% efficiency is fine). Let’s build in the coming 1-2 decades that 55% capacity first, shall we and worry about the remaining 45% later, when storage technology matures (hydrogen/ammonia or metals).”
    Well, neder, you are throwing cold water on your won optimistic projections for renewables market penetration. Now you are admitting the problem is manageable until you hit 55%.

    “Here are the world’s premier renewable energy experts, the German Fraunhofer institute, who calculated that you can very well have a 90-100% renewable energy system at the same cost as our current fossil-based system:”
    This is a very flawed study with political goals over scientific evidence.

  30. Cloggie on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 8:10 am 

    Well, neder, you are throwing cold water on your won optimistic projections for renewables market penetration. Now you are admitting the problem is manageable until you hit 55%.

    No, I don’t say that at all.

    I say that we can manage a 90-100% renewable energy base by 2050 or much earlier.

    This is a very flawed study with political goals over scientific evidence.

    Davy is now bluffing that he actually read the study, let alone understood it.lol

  31. Davy on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 8:18 am 

    “I say that we can manage a 90-100% renewable energy base by 2050 or much earlier.”

    That is about as vague and open ended a response as one can make. Sounds like how fussionist talk.

    “Davy is now bluffing that he actually read the study, let alone understood it.lol”

    I rummaged through the cornucopian propaganda several times in response to your many references to it. Yes I have read through it and understand it. The problem is you believe it like gospel.

  32. Cloggie on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 9:10 am 

    Yes I have read through it and understand it.

    Excellent. And where is the calculation flaw that forces you to reject its conclusions?

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/09/16/blueprint-100-renewable-energy-base-for-germany/

    tic-toc-tic-toc

  33. Davy on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 9:34 am 

    Lol, neder, the report is huge you expect me to do your tic toc work. Give me your take on it and I will critique it.

  34. Davy on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 11:09 am 

    Oops, sorry Cloggie Sir. I keep forgetting that you are an engineer and I am not. At least your opinion is backed with personal knowledge and expertise. Mine is only backed by my feelings of exceptionalism and grandeur.

  35. Davy on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 11:31 am 

    I’m sure you also understand Cloggie, that the reason I keep squabbling with you all the time is because you said bad things about the US. That makes me really mad.

  36. JuanP on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 11:34 am 

    JuanP is back at it

  37. JuanP on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 11:36 am 

    The board was clean but I am back to make it dirty and nasty becuase I am ME JuanP.

  38. Cloggie on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 11:40 am 

    Juan, take a break friend. There is no reason to play your cards until it is needed.

  39. Cloggie on Mon, 24th Dec 2018 12:44 pm 

    The posts above are the usual identity theft, back to energy:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2018/12/23/offshore-wind-in-nw-europe/

    “Who does what in the field of offshore wind in Europe?”

    Denmark: wind turbines, R&D, installation, wind farm operating
    Germany: turbines, monopile production, foundations, cabling
    Holland: maritime operations (turbines, cables), monopile production, grid connection
    Britain: EPCI, installation, cables, foundations

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