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Deluge Thread 2019

Deluge Thread 2019

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 03 Feb 2019, 22:55:51

20,000 homes feared lost in Australia floods as crocodiles, snakes wash up

https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/03/australi ... index.html
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Re: Deluge Thread 2019

Unread postby dohboi » Tue 30 Apr 2019, 21:15:17

Excessive Rainfall as Damaging to Corn Yield as Extreme Heat, Drought
https://m.phys.org/news/2019-04-excessi ... treme.html
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Re: Deluge Thread 2019

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 19 May 2019, 09:41:30


Why The U.S. Just Had Its Wettest 12-Month Stretch On Record


I am always careful when writing this type of piece because there is usually some contrarian hanging out on Twitter waiting to pounce on statements like “It’s the ______est year ever.” To avoid cliche trolling, it is important to use the word “on record.” With that out of the way, let’s discuss the U.S. experiencing its wettest 12-month stretch on record (in this case 1895 to 2019). Deke Arndt, a climatologist at NOAA’s National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI), tweeted:

In case you missed it, the last 12 months (May ’18 through Apr ’19) is the wettest 12-month stretch on record for the US. A warmer world turns up the hydrology dial. When we are sent the bill for climate change, it comes in the context of our water.

Here are the meteorological and climatological reasons why this likely happened as well as further explanation of the last sentence of Arndt’s Tweet.

NOAA
The graphic [below] shows how abnormally it was in the U.S. from May 2018 to April 2019, particularly in the upper Midwest and the eastern U.S. By the way, if you live in the region shaded orange-brown, resist the urge to say “but it was drier where I live” so climate change is a hoax. Your local experience doesn’t define the global experience.

Before I discuss climate connections, it is important to discuss meteorological connections first. The inevitable “it has always rained” or “climate changes naturally” is lurking in someone’s head right now. My placeholder response is that grass on your lawn grows naturally too, but it you put fertilizer on the soil, it grows differently. I will provide a more robust discussion later in the article.

Several places, including Washington, D.C, broke records for wettest 12-month stretch. Jason Samenow wrote an outstanding article in the Washington Post Capital Weather Gang explaining the meteorological context for the period. I summarize Samenow’s key points:

• A persistently high-pressure pattern east of the U.S. transported Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico moisture into the eastern half of the country.
• Another persistently high-pressure pattern near Alaska allowed storm-tracks to be directed into the upper Midwest and East by the jet stream
• Possible jet stream modifications due to the emerging El Nino (warm central Pacific sea surface temperatures). ...


https://www.forbes.com/sites/marshallsh ... on-record/
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Re: Deluge Thread 2019

Unread postby dohboi » Mon 20 May 2019, 21:03:56

Looks like OKC is in for a drenching on top of a wet spring. Flooding is predicted, and tornadoes in the area, too.
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