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Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

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Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby eclipse » Sun 05 Feb 2017, 23:28:10

Hi all,
anyone got stats for American, and world, heavy vehicle use of oil for all categories? Basically not family cars & SUV's & light trucks like buses and council garbage trucks, all of which can be electric, but heavy long-haul trucks, agriculture, mining, etc. What fraction of oil is it? I'm trying to eliminate all vehicles that can be replaced with EV's, and work out the difference.

Also, anyone got even more detail on what fraction of diesel use is 'light' trucking that could one day be replaced by electric, especially considering the savings to local government! They're more expensive up front, but payback within 4 years and after that electricity instead of diesel saves the city government money.
http://arstechnica.co.uk/cars/2016/08/e ... -analysis/
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Mon 06 Feb 2017, 02:33:32

My God, you want us to do arithmetic on Super Bowl Sunday, when we are drunk and weepy?
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby eclipse » Mon 06 Feb 2017, 03:13:25

Ha ha! Yeah, I'm not even an Aussie sports fan, where we have the SAME guys run around most of the match without armour, let alone that strangely armoured, over-clad, over-funded, over-staffed foreign grid-iron thing! ;-)

But I hear what you are saying: you're probably full of beer, chicken wings and guacamole!

Roughly 28,000,000 pounds (13,000,000 kg) of chips, 1.25 billion chicken wings, and 8,000,000 pounds (3,600,000 kg) of guacamole are consumed during the Super Bowl.[16][17]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Bowl_Sunday
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby kublikhan » Mon 06 Feb 2017, 03:15:41

You can get a breakdown of US diesel usage here: Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

Total US diesel consumption in 2015 was about 61 billion gallons per year or about 4 million bpd. The US consumed about 19 million bpd of oil in 2015. So about 21% of US oil consumption is diesel(some of that is heating oil as well).

The portion of the US light duty vehicle fleet that is diesel powered is pretty small. If you just want a rough idea of how much oil can be saved by electrifying the US light duty vehicle fleet I would just go with US gasoline consumption, which is about 9.2 million bpd. Add it a bit of diesel for diesel powered light duty vehicles and call it about half of US oil consumption could be saved if the entire US light duty vehicle fleet was electrified. The other half of oil consumption is heavy duty diesel usage, heating oil, jet fuel, bunker fuel, plastic, propane, asphalt, etc.
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Mon 06 Feb 2017, 08:25:38

k - "US diesel consumption in 2015 was about 61 billion gallons". Plus we were a net diesel exporter that year of 15 billion gallons. Long history of a US/EU gasoline/diesel swap.
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby sparky » Mon 06 Feb 2017, 19:51:41

.
I did saw numbers on this trade , If you can be bothered , shine a light on it
is it due to the grades of crudes or is it because Europe is more diesel intensive
in several countries there is a tax advantage on using diesel for passenger cars
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby eclipse » Mon 06 Feb 2017, 20:21:50

Cool, so we don't even have to replace all diesel use in Europe as EV's can take over those roles. That takes the pressure of synthetic diesel (or others like powdered boron).
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Tue 07 Feb 2017, 00:05:22

Sparky - Simple demand economics: products go where higher demand garners better prices. Though they can vary a good bit all oil essentially have gasoline and diesel fractions.
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby Zarquon » Tue 07 Feb 2017, 01:06:52

Doesn't Light Duty include pickups?

Also, diesel is pretty much the same as heating oil. Replace trucks with EVs and the price of heating oil goes down a lot, reducing the incentive for insulation or switching to gas. And I'm not sure how well refineries could adapt their output.
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby eclipse » Tue 07 Feb 2017, 04:06:03

Given the peak oil supply constraints, anything that reduces the pressure on oil demand is a good thing. Big picture.
HEATING:-
People can switch to heating their homes with reverse cycle air conditioning which is quite efficient, with maybe have a tank of some kind of backup diesel generator or other wood heating if there's a power outage emergency in a snowstorm and lives are at risk. (We don't really face that here in Australia, our winters are uncomfortable in most capital cities, not deadly.) Tom Blees outlines an alternative to liquid fuels with boron as transport fuel, and describes having extra tanks of boron powder out in the garage to run through the car and generate power to heat homes and save lives in just such an emergency. But that would be the 'boron economy'. That would be the other side of the bottleneck.

If we can get through peak oil and climate change with nuclear powered grids running half our transport as EV's and the other half on some other alternative fuel, I'm happy. Heating fuels is As I see it, synthetic diesel is one option, boron powder another, and now even truly VAST seaweed farms for good old bio-gas is now a third option.
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Tue 07 Feb 2017, 06:53:31

Z - "And I'm not sure how well refineries could adapt their output." Some flexibility but there are limits. For instance we produce more distillate then our domestic market demands so we export a good bit. One of the reasons the US is the largest exporter of refined oil products.

From the EIA: "In 2015, refineries in the United States produced an average of about 19 gallons of motor gasoline and 12 gallons of ultra-low sulfur distillate fuel oil (includes diesel fuel and heating oil) from one 42-gallon barrel of crude oil. Many other petroleum products are also refined from crude oil. Refinery yields of individual products vary from month to month as refiners focus operations to meet demand for different products and work to maximize profits."

IOW the diesel yield is a function of the composition of the blended oil processed by a refinery. And while blends are designed with specific yield targets all oil contains some distillate fuel oil (diesel fuel and heating oil). For those not familiar with the refining process:

Separation - Modern separation involves piping crude oil through hot furnaces. The resulting liquids and vapors are discharged into distillation units. Inside the distillation units, the liquids and vapors separate into petroleum components called fractions according to their weight and boiling point. Heavy fractions are on the bottom and light fractions are on the top. The lightest fractions, including gasoline and liquid petroleum gas (LPG), vaporize and rise to the top of the distillation tower, where they condense back to liquids. Medium weight liquids, including kerosene and diesel oil distillates, stay in the middle of the distillation tower. Heavier liquids, called gas oils, separate lower down in the distillation tower, while the heaviest fractions with the highest boiling points settle at the bottom of the tower.

Conversion - After distillation, heavy, lower-value distillation fractions can be processed further into lighter, higher-value products such as gasoline. This is where fractions from the distillation units are transformed into streams (intermediate components) that eventually become finished products. The most widely used conversion method is called cracking because it uses heat and pressure to crack heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter ones. A cracking unit consists of one or more tall, thick-walled, rocket-shaped reactors and a network of furnaces, heat exchangers, and other vessels. Cracking is not the only form of crude oil conversion. Other refinery processes rearrange molecules to add value rather than splitting molecules. Alkylation, for example, makes gasoline components by combining some of the gaseous byproducts of cracking. The process, which essentially is cracking in reverse, takes place in a series of large, horizontal vessels and tall, skinny towers. Reforming uses heat, moderate pressure, and catalysts to turn naphtha, a light, relatively low-value fraction, into high-octane gasoline components.

Treatment- The finishing touches occur during the final treatment. To make gasoline, refinery technicians carefully combine a variety of streams from the processing units. Octane level, vapor pressure ratings, and other special considerations determine the gasoline blend.
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Re: Heavy trucking percent of oil use?

Unread postby Subjectivist » Tue 07 Feb 2017, 13:09:02

Something I learned back in the early 1980's is Gasoline and Kerosene/Diesel #2 are chemically very close, to the point that the lower 40 percent of the latter is overlapping the top 35 percent of Gasoline components. As a consequence if you are a poor student with a jalopy car you can swipe a few gallons of fuel oil from the furnace tank, throw in some cheap octane booster, and get another 20 miles out of your car.
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