Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Discussions of conventional and alternative energy production technologies.

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Sat 03 Jan 2015, 16:23:21

Americans Want America To Run On Solar and Wind

Americans “overwhelmingly” prefer solar and wind energy to coal, oil, and nuclear energy, according to a Harvard political scientist who has conducted a comprehensive survey of attitudes toward energy and climate for the last 12 years.

Americans see natural gas as a bridge fuel that falls somewhere in between, offering some benefits over traditional fuels but more “harms” than solar and wind, said Harvard Government Professor Stephen Ansolabehere during a December appearance at the University of Chicago.

“Americans want to move away from coal, oil and nuclear power and toward wind and solar,” said Ansolabehere, introduced as “the leading energy political scientist in the world” to climate scientists, physicists, economists and public-policy experts at The Energy Policy Institute of Chicago (EPIC). Ansolabehere described solar and wind energy as “hugely popular, overwhelmingly popular.”

So popular, in fact, that they easily cross the partisan divide that polarizes Americans on so many other issues. About 80 percent of Americans said they want solar and wind energy to “increase a lot,” and another 10 percent or so want it to increase somewhat.

“In order to get 90 percent, that means a lot of Republicans like solar and wind—more than coal. Everybody likes those sources. This is non-partisan.”


forbes
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Tue 06 Jan 2015, 16:50:47

OPINION: Wind and solar — the perfect partnership

The wind and solar industries have long lived in twin solitudes. Plainly, that is changing.
For governments, utilities, developers and institutional investors, wind and solar — brushing up against grid parity in most major markets now — are together lighting the way forward.

The signs can be seen in US solar powerhouse SunEdison’s $2.4bn takeover of First Wind, snapping up 521MW of wind and solar operating assets, as well as 1.6GW on the drawing board.

Differently dressed, the message can be read in Chinese wind giant Ming Yang’s third-quarter report, where, along with bumper profits, it announced “a joint offering of wind-solar complementary solutions” with concentrating PV outfit RedSolar.

Or again, in Renova Energia’s R$440m ($176m) spend on the 107MW of PV it won in Brazil’s first solar auction — which it added to a portfolio that includes 470MW of operational wind farms — in line with a growth strategy that bundles wind and solar projects together in one development pipeline.

A report from Ernst & Young points straight at wind and solar’s “attractiveness of stable and contracted cash flows” as the key force behind international M&A that catalysed 233 deals worth $97bn in the second and third quarters of 2014, including 19 in excess of $1bn.

Aquila Capital sees the argument this way: the two technologies have complementary return profiles, “resulting in lower volatility and greater return stability. Institutional investors are increasingly seeking strategies that offer a combination of renewable-energy opportunities”.

Grid parity marks wind and solar as not only the cleanest sources of energy, but also the cheapest. New-build onshore wind costs less than a new-build gas-fired or nuclear power station, when you count decommissioning. PV is even better.

This is changing minds. Wind and solar now represent a €175bn ($215bn) market that is mushrooming at 8-10% a year. By 2020, wind will have an installed base of 700GW, solar 430GW.


rechargenews
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Tue 13 Jan 2015, 15:32:58

IRENA Unveils REsource — “Google” For Renewable Energy Information

The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)* is about to launch an awesome new tool called REsource. While we here at CleanTechnica do what we can to be the world’s leading source of cleantech information, we are always happy to see others to do a great job in this space. IRENA has long been one of the top places I go for renewable energy information, but its resources have gotten better and better in the past couple of years. REsource takes that to another level. As you can see from the sneak-peak screenshot below, it is akin to a Google of renewable energy.

“The rapid growth of the renewable energy industry outpaces the information available to monitor and analyse the sector,” IRENA writes. “To date, renewable energy information has been scattered, and is perceived as less accessible, less detailed and less accurate than the information on conventional energy. This lack of information has created a falsely uncertain environment for investors and fuelled misperceptions in public opinion.”

Indeed, if you go looking for some renewable energy fact, there are dozens of organizations where you have to consider searching for it. Sadly, Google often isn’t that helpful, and sources you come across via Google may seem dodgy. Perhaps you get to other knowledgeable website, but be careful — data may be years out of date, and forecasts are so abominable, you’d be better off asking your talking parrot for her or his prediction.

Like I said, we here at CleanTechnica have been working on slowly accumulating and creating useful resources for solar energy information (see here, here, and here), wind energy information (see here, here, and here), and electric vehicle information (see here and here), but we are very limited in what we can achieve, and everyone know’s CleanTechnica‘s key strength and focus — being the top website in the world for cleantech news and commentary. It’s a relief off my shoulders to see IRENA’s continual progress as a resource for renewable energy facts and reports, and REsource is clearly the capstone at this point.


cleantechnica
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Sat 17 Jan 2015, 14:54:16

US Making Real Gains in Renewable Deployment

Last week, we documented the very real gains the US economy had made under President Obama. This week we look at the progress made in the important renewable energy sector.

At NDN, we’ve long argued that the goal of US energy policy should be to create a cheaper, more distributed and cleaner energy future for our companies and consumers. The President has pursued an “all of the above” energy strategy, which has increased domestic production of oil and gas, seen tremendous advances in renewable deployment, regulated pollution that harms the climate and environment, and improved efficiency to conserve more energy. This strategy has seen significant dividends already as America’s domestic oil and gas production is booming, global energy prices have plummeted, the deployment of renewables in the US has skyrocketed.

Let’s take a deeper dive into renewable energy:

Solar
• Solar installation has surged as prices have plummeted. In fact, annual solar installations have increased by ten-fold since President Obama took office in 2009.
• All the while, the price it costs to install the system has fallen by nearly 63% in the same time frame.


Image

• The Solar Industry has grown from about 93,500 jobs in 2010 to over 174,000 in 2014 – an increase of about 86% overall. It grew at about twenty times greater than the overall economy in the past four years.



Wind
• Prior to the 2008, the Wind Energy Industry was small and was projected to have sluggish growth through 2030. In the late 2000’s, Wind power's deployment accelerated, reaching 50 GW in 2012—about 18 years ahead of the projected schedule. Installations of wind power capacity tripled from 2008 – 2012 almost tripled.

• Today, Wind powers about 18 million homes in the U.S. and is the largest form of renewable energy (besides hydropower) and an emerging industry.


ndn
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby lpetrich » Sat 07 Feb 2015, 12:21:04

Graeme wrote:Image
ndn

That graph ought to have a logarithmic scale for the installed capacity for each year.

I transcribed the numbers into Mathematica, and then plotted them using a log scale. It's remarkably close to a straight line in that scale, meaning approximately exponential growth. About an increase by a factor of 10 every 4 1/2 years. That gives an installed capacity of 1 terawatt in 2024, close to the US's electricity consumption.
User avatar
lpetrich
Lignite
Lignite
 
Posts: 361
Joined: Thu 22 Jun 2006, 02:00:00

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby DesuMaiden » Sat 07 Feb 2015, 21:26:09

There is at least some hope with solar energy since we can make solar panels out of more common metals rather than rare earth metals.

http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/press ... nable.html
History repeats itself. Just everytime with different characters and players.
DesuMaiden
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 851
Joined: Mon 06 Oct 2014, 15:00:31

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby dinopello » Wed 11 Feb 2015, 20:43:26

I don't think there are any solar panels left

After Apple installs a 3000 Acre solar project

Now Cook is putting his prodigious sums of money where his mouth is, proclaiming the “biggest, boldest and most ambitious project ever,” an $850 million agreement to buy solar power from First Solar, the biggest U.S. developer of solar farms. The deal will supply enough electricity to power all of Apple’s California stores, offices, headquarters and a data center, Cook said Tuesday at the Goldman Sachs technology conference in San Francisco.

It’s the biggest-ever solar procurement deal for a company that isn't a utility, and it nearly triples Apple’s stake in solar, according to an analysis by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF). “The investment amount is enormous,” said Michel Di Capua, head of North American research at BNEF. “This is a really big deal.”
User avatar
dinopello
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 6089
Joined: Fri 13 May 2005, 02:00:00
Location: The Urban Village

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby Ulenspiegel » Thu 12 Feb 2015, 09:47:45

MonteQuest

the spinning reserve argument is nonsense. Batteries can do the job for a much lower price.
Ulenspiegel
Lignite
Lignite
 
Posts: 260
Joined: Thu 04 Jul 2013, 02:15:29

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby Ulenspiegel » Thu 12 Feb 2015, 10:06:25

@ h2,

h2 wrote: "Given the overall absolute rates of german fossil fuel consumption, that's an absurd statement, totally absurd. That's why I post charts instead of playing with words.; You're talking about roughly 75% fossil fuel total energy today if that chart is roughly accurate. Remind me again how much natural gas germany produces? "

If you ask what the German economy could survive then the 150 USD/barrel are indeed doable, you only have to check trade balances and costs of energy imports, here absolute hard numbers are illuminating. With high fuel taxes the increase of prices at German fuel stations is not that dramatic. However, the real issue is that the export markets Germany depends on (e.g. USA) would collapse long before.

"I find or rather, found, the german efforts to see how much renewable energy they can add to the mix interesting, but really, you have to add in outsourced production, BMW is in mississippee if I remember right, BASF I believe is heading towards Brazil to avoid high energy costs last I checked, don't follow it closely enough to really know. "

BASF is buying NG, actually they generate their electricity 100% on-site, therefore the argument that high electricity rates are a problem is nonsense. They are not leaving. BTW aluminium production increases in Germany. What does this tell you? And other industrial production increases in Germany, too. HINT: avarage prices do not tell you the interesting story.
Ulenspiegel
Lignite
Lignite
 
Posts: 260
Joined: Thu 04 Jul 2013, 02:15:29

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby joyfulbozo » Thu 19 Feb 2015, 01:37:12

The ongoing volatility in the oil markets has led many major companies to dramatically slash their capex budgets and workforces in a bid to survive. The knock on effect of this can be seen in a burgeoning solar industry that is seizing the opportunity to finally make a significant breakthrough into the market, regardless of subsidies.
joyfulbozo
Wood
Wood
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Fri 10 Oct 2014, 05:33:12

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby JimBof » Thu 19 Feb 2015, 07:18:53

Has anybody worked out how to capture this solar energy?
Australian Weather
http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/?ref=ftr
Two simultaneous cyclones
Northern Territory Lam Cat 4 Wind Speed 220 KPH
Queensland Marcia Cat 5 Wind Speed 295KPH
JimBof
Peat
Peat
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri 20 Jun 2014, 06:34:56

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby dashster » Fri 20 Feb 2015, 08:50:17

h2 wrote:
Peak oil has stopped to be a threat for Germany. Maybe some interruption in the supply chain, maybe higher costs. So what? we will survive 150US$/barrel easily if it comes to that again. Electric cars and plug in hybrids just start to become an alernative.


Given the overall absolute rates of german fossil fuel consumption, that's an absurd statement, totally absurd. That's why I post charts instead of playing with words.; You're talking about roughly 75% fossil fuel total energy today if that chart is roughly accurate. Remind me again how much natural gas germany produces?


The person said Peak Oil and you responded by talking about fossil fuels and singled out natural gas. Peak Oil is not equivalent to Peak Oil + Peak Coal + Peak Gas.
dashster
Lignite
Lignite
 
Posts: 384
Joined: Fri 28 Dec 2012, 07:39:24
Location: California

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby dashster » Fri 20 Feb 2015, 08:53:45

joyfulbozo wrote:The ongoing volatility in the oil markets has led many major companies to dramatically slash their capex budgets and workforces in a bid to survive. The knock on effect of this can be seen in a burgeoning solar industry that is seizing the opportunity to finally make a significant breakthrough into the market, regardless of subsidies.


Can you elaborate more. What is the industry or industries where capex is being slashed due to fluctuating oil prices? If you are talking about the oil industry, I don't follow how reducing oil exploration leaves things open for solar.
dashster
Lignite
Lignite
 
Posts: 384
Joined: Fri 28 Dec 2012, 07:39:24
Location: California

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby DesuMaiden » Fri 27 Feb 2015, 20:29:14

If you live in the USA (where most of the electricity comes from fossil fuels or nuclear energy), solar energy might be the only way you can still have electricity in the future as fossil fuels and uranium go into decline. So you better start investing in solar energy before it is too late. However, solar energy is never going to be able to power industrial civilization the way we are accustomed to (due to the limitations of solar energy), and it is unrealistic to expect solar energy will save us from the collapse of industrial civilization.
History repeats itself. Just everytime with different characters and players.
DesuMaiden
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 851
Joined: Mon 06 Oct 2014, 15:00:31

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby onlooker » Thu 02 Apr 2015, 18:40:49

all the replacement for fossil fuels should have been implemented quite a number of years back. We should have already built a huge infrastructure of renewable energy, wind and solar. Not that this was ever going to fully replace fossil fuels but just like the population we should have reigned in our economy. Alas, we did none of that we continued using fossil fuels instead of transitioning to renewable. Now is is too late as you said Desu, it is not unrealistic that any energy is going to allow industrial civilization to continue. The best we can hope for is to try and transition to a much less complex and energy consuming economy. Now in terms of the food supply and transportation that is where we will have to try and somehow compensate for less available energy. How? I have no idea but we better come up with some ideas very fast.
"We are mortal beings doomed to die
User avatar
onlooker
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 10510
Joined: Sun 10 Nov 2013, 12:49:04
Location: NY, USA

Reality Check: 2014 Renewable Energy Recap

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Mon 11 May 2015, 16:48:12

2014 Renewable Energy Recap: Stepping Backward, Crawling Forward
By Dave Levitan, IEEE Spectrum

If we want to stay positive, 2014 was the year when solar power started making the sort of noise in global energy markets that experts have long predicted. If we allow some cynicism to creep in, 2014 was a year when big ideas stalled out, when falling oil prices left renewable energy’s immediate future in limbo, and when international climate deals seem both hopeful and far too timid.

Half full, half empty—take your pick!

Let’s start with the empty side. As has become tradition in these year-end posts, a quick look at the U.S. offshore wind industry: nope, still nothing. The miniature test turbine up in Maine (1) remains the lone offshore turbine; the big projects gunning for the real first-in-water prize, meanwhile, do seem to be getting close. Star-crossed Cape Wind is finally through its legal and permitting hurdles, has made financing progress including $150 million from the Department of Energy (2), and plans to start construction in 2015 (3); Deepwater Wind’s Block Island Wind Farm is also on track, with permitting completed and steps like naming its turbine foundation fabricator (4). Progress, perhaps, until we look at Europe and it’s 7000-plus megawatts of installed offshore capacity (5).

Another branch of marine-based renewable energy had a particularly disappointing year: wave power, long hyped as a great untapped source, seems to be taking steps backward all the time. Ocean Power Technologies, among the theoretical leaders in developing viable wave power tech, has scaled back or cancelled several plans this year (6), and the world still has no grid-connected wave power at all. In fact, we don’t even really know what wave energy should look like; designs abound, and research continues, but even a few megawatts of wave energy by decade’s end would be impressive (7).

Moving to the full part of the glass, solar power is really starting to explode. In the U.S., a big third quarter brought the country up to 16.1 gigawatts of installed photovoltaic capacity, with another 1.4 GW of concentrating solar power. According to the Solar Energy Industries Association, the growth through three quarters represented 36 percent of all new electricity capacity (8); in 2012, solar represented only 9.6 percent of new growth.

Around the world as well, solar made headlines this year. Germany produced half of its electricity from solar power on one particularly sunny day in June, and even the gloomy weather of the United Kingdom set records (9).

But wait, don’t get too excited: oil prices are dropping with remarkable speed. Though opinions differ about the consequence. Some—like Richard Branson—say this drop in dirty energy prices will have a severely limiting effect on solar power (10). Others argue that the markets are different, with oil prices affecting transportation fuels far more than the electricity generation markets where solar has been growing (11). Exactly how $50-per-barrel or lower oil will affect clean energy uptake will be a big story in 2015.

The other major driver of renewables moving forward is national and international climate policy. This year saw an historic deal between China and the United States, far and away the world’s two biggest emitters. It would cut U.S. emissions 26-28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025, and China commited to a peak emissions date of 2030. There are varying opinions on just how great this deal really is, but it undoubtedly changed the international, um, climate, surrounding emissions cuts (12). The Lima COP20 talks did produce something, though it is little more than a guideline for what might happen next year in Paris (13). A truly strong, binding, international climate deal, of the type we had all hoped for back in 2009 in Copenhagen and that some do hold out hope for in Paris in 2015, would have an immediate effect on renewable energy development.

Crawl forward, step back, leap forward, fall down flat. Renewable energy progress has never been particularly linear, and this year was no exception. Let’s check back in 12 months to see if these bumpy lines can all start pointing in the right direction.

(1) http://bangordailynews.com/video/umaine-powers-up-volturnus-delivers-first-ever-electricity-to-americas-from-offshore-wind/
(2) http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-offers-conditional-commitment-cape-wind-offshore-wind-generation-projec-0
(3) http://www.capewind.org/when
(4) http://dwwind.com/news/deepwater-wind-names-block-island-wind-farm-foundation-fabricator-work-slated-for-early-2015
(5) http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/files/library/publications/statistics/European_offshore_statistics_1st-half_2014.pdf
(6) http://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/renewables/wave-powers-uncertain-future
(7) http://e360.yale.edu/feature/why_wave_power_has_lagged_far_behind_as_energy_source/2760/
(8) http://www.seia.org/news/united-states-installs-1354-mw-solar-q3-2014
(9) http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/23/uk-and-germany-break-solar-power-records
(10) http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/dec/16/cheaper-oil-could-damage-renewable-energies-says-richard-branson
(11) http://www.cnbc.com/id/102254283#.
(12) http://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/environment/obama-xi-breathe-new-chi-into-the-global-climate-change-talks
(13) http://www.vox.com/2014/12/15/7396387/lima-climate-deal-voluntary
KaiserJeep 2.0, Neural Subnode 0010 0000 0001 0110 - 1001 0011 0011, Tertiary Adjunct to Unimatrix 0000 0000 0001

Resistance is Futile, YOU will be Assimilated.

Warning: Messages timestamped before April 1, 2016, 06:00 PST were posted by the unmodified human KaiserJeep 1.0
KaiserJeep
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 6094
Joined: Tue 06 Aug 2013, 16:16:32
Location: Wisconsin's Dreamland

Re: Reality Check: 2014 Renewable Energy Recap

Unread postby kiwichick » Tue 12 May 2015, 02:58:50

@ kj

the section about the wave power is not correct

Carnegie has grid connected wave power supplying a Australian navel base off the coast of Western Australia

they are also in the process of supplying desalinated water
User avatar
kiwichick
Intermediate Crude
Intermediate Crude
 
Posts: 2267
Joined: Sat 02 Aug 2008, 02:00:00
Location: Southland New Zealand

PreviousNext

Return to Energy Technology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Cog and 9 guests