Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Discussions of conventional and alternative energy production technologies.

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby StarvingLion » Tue 13 May 2014, 03:10:38

What difference does it make what energy tech suits your fancy. Geographic areas that have focused on a distinctive energy technology are failing:

France: nuclear
Germany: mainstream renewables (pv and wind)

Fail. No leverage provided by either.
Physicist: "We'll all fucking die from our own fucking dumbness"
StarvingLion
Heavy Crude
Heavy Crude
 
Posts: 1441
Joined: Sat 03 Aug 2013, 17:59:17

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Thu 29 May 2014, 18:13:45

New Report Highlights Economic Value of Solar and Wind Energy

Large-scale deployment of renewable energy can create jobs, increase incomes, improve trade balances, and contribute to industrial development—if the right policies and frameworks are in place. That's according to a new report released by the Clean Energy Ministerial's Multilateral Solar and Wind Working Group. The report, econValue - The Socio-economic Benefits of Solar and Wind Energy, analyses the circumstances under which renewable energy can boost economies and benefit communities by studying the effects of solar and wind energy on the environment, economy, and society. Produced by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), the report provides a framework to help policy makers analyse the various economic opportunities that may be offered by solar and wind sector development and the potential of various policy instruments to best realise those opportunities.

"As many economies are still recovering from the global financial crisis, renewable energy offers an opportunity to grow economies, improve energy security, enhance energy access, and mitigate climate change," said IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. "Policy makers around the world are exploring ways to stimulate social and economic growth through the renewable energy sector, and this report is an important step to support them on this path."

The report focuses on key macroeconomic variables for assessing economic impact—including value added, gross domestic product, welfare, and employment—and looks at opportunities at each stage of the renewable energy life cycle, from project planning and manufacturing to maintenance and decommissioning.

The report also analyses policies that stimulate the deployment of renewables, as well as those policies that help build a domestic industry by encouraging investment and technology transfer; strengthening firm-level capabilities; and promoting education, training, research, and innovation. Case studies are used to support key recommendations for policy options to maximise value creation. Finally, the report provides guidance on the selection of tools that can be used to assess socio-economic impacts of renewable energy deployment.


prnewswire
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Tue 03 Jun 2014, 17:44:47

Report Charts Renewable Energy’s Rapid Advance Into the Mainstream Mix

Renewable energy sources supplied nearly one-fifth (19 percent) of final energy consumption worldwide in 2012 and continued growing in 2013, according to the Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century’s (REN21) “Renewables 2014 Global Status Report,” one of the most thorough and comprehensive reports on conditions and trends in global use of renewable energy.

Technological advances, cost reductions, and the spread of supportive government policies and institutional frameworks have progressed much faster and further than had been anticipated, REN21 highlights in its latest report, to the point where the cost of wind, solar, biomass, waste-to-energy and geothermal energy is on par, or even below, that of conventional fossil fuels across a widening range of countries, regions and uses. Commenting on renewables’ rapid advance into the mainstream energy mix, REN21 states:

“[M]ost mainstream projections did not predict the extraordinary expansion of renewables that was to unfold in the coming decade. Numerous scenarios projected levels of renewable energy for 2020 that were already surpassed by 2010. Today, renewable energy technologies are seen not only as a tool for improving energy security, but also as a way to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and to provide direct and indirect social benefits.”
Renewables in 2013: The growing role of developing countries

Geographical expansion and diversification of renewable energy technology and markets across the developing world was a key driver of growing renewable energy use in 2012 and 2013, according to REN21′s latest annual report, its sixth. Renewable energy is growing across key large, developing countries – such as Brazil, China, India and South Africa — as well as regionally across the Asia-Pacific; Europe; the Middle East and Africa; and the Americas.


triplepundit
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Thu 05 Jun 2014, 18:29:00

8 amazing and incredible renewable energy projects that we totally love

On the day that David Cameron has taken another step to clear the path for fracking in the UK, we're taking a look at a few ideas he could be throwing his weight behind instead. Here are 8 renewable energy projects that we totally love. We'd like to hear about others you like too, so leave us a message in the comments below and let us know what we’ve missed.

1. Germany has invested big in solar and wind. And in the first six months of 2012, the amount of electricity produced using renewables jumped from 20% to 25%


greenpeace
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Mon 09 Jun 2014, 17:37:19

Doubling Renewable Energy Worldwide Could Save $740 Billion per Year

hen combining all of the world’s countries, 18 percent of the world’s electricity consumption comes from renewable sources. A global agency estimates that amount could be doubled in a little more than 15 years while saving a combined $740 billion per year in the process.

The latest study, REmap 2030, from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) estimates that amping up renewables to constitute 36 percent of the international energy mix would more than offset the costs associated with fossil fuel pollution. It would also reduce the global demand for oil and gas by about 15 percent, and for coal by 26 percent.

Some of the graphics within REmap include annual investment needs and percentage breakdowns in doubling renewables’ share of the world’s TFEC—total final energy consumption—by 2030.


earthtechling
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Thu 12 Jun 2014, 17:13:07

Having shared positive news about food, this article clearly illustrates the challenge remaining for renewable energy development.

Climate Catastrophe If Solar Deployment Doesn’t Increase 12 Times Over By 2030, According To IRENA

If solar energy deployment doesn’t increase 12 times over by the year 2030, the world is headed towards a “climate catastrophe,” according to a recent report from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).

Not exactly a new warning, but certainly worth heeding and being aware of. That said, the report — REmap 2013 — isn’t “doomsy.” It lays out a clear path to the goal of a 36% share of renewables in the energy mix by 2030.

The purpose of the achievement of the 36% share is to limit the atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide to less than 450ppm (it’s debatable whether the achievement of that goal would limit emissions to that degree, and whether or not that would be enough to avoid world-shaking catastrophe), and thus limit warming to less than 2 degrees Celsius (again, quite debatable).

That said, whether or not those goals are adequate isn’t really the issue — it may be that the goals need to be more ambitious, but the achievement of even these, possibly inadequate, goals will require substantial political action and change, something that isn’t at all certain. That is most definitely the most important takeaway of the report — significant increases are necessary to avoid very high levels of warming, and they are possible, but require more commitment than has been shown up until now.

Via the pathway provided by the IRENA model, wind energy will need to increase even more than solar — by a factor of 15 by the year 2030. Geothermal, hydro, and biomass will all need to increase significantly as well — by a factor of 9, 2, and 1.5, respectively. The IRENA model doesn’t factor in potentially significant growth in tidal energy generation.

While this may all sound like it would be very expensive, it’s worth remembering that the savings are significant as well — especially the savings on health and environmental costs.


cleantechnica
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Sat 28 Jun 2014, 22:39:02

World Gets 22% of Electricity From Renewable Energy

The Renewables 2014 Global Status Report released earlier this month has good news for the environment, namely that an estimated 22.1% of the world’s electricity was generated from renewable sources in 2013. That percentage is expected to rise as countries across the globe pour money and resources into alternative, clean energy.


wsj
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Mon 30 Jun 2014, 19:46:02

4 New Energy Maps Show A Lot About Renewables

When the U.S. Energy Information Administration launched its new U.S. Energy Mapping System last fall and upgraded it for use on mobile devices in early June, it powered a system allowing anyone to visualize some of the reams of data the EIA compiles on all things energy-related in the country.

That mapping system has a lot to show about renewables — critical to reducing climate change-driving greenhouse gas emissions — and the spread of renewables development across the continent. Here are four cool things the new Energy Mapping System can show you about where renewable energy is being produced and where it has the potential to be generated in the future:


cleantechnica
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Wed 02 Jul 2014, 17:28:38

World Energy Exec Sees International Win-Win, Fast Track For Renewables

Adnan Z. Amin, Director-General of the International Renewable Energy Agency* and initiator of a series of world conferences on off-grid and minigrid electrification, sees our world on the cusp of unprecedented energy transformation. Not only will the use of renewables for reliable, clean electricity contribute to universal access to power, it may also help keep the lid on climate change. All the while, cooperative efforts will propel entrepreneurs, technology innovators, multinational industry, development organizations, rulemaking bodies, and government representatives toward success in achieving common renewable goals for world energy.

Mr. Amin should know. He spent many years in New York at the UN digesting international priorities, policies, and financing and regulatory tools and has extensive knowledge of both business models and renewable technology.

In an interview at the recent International Off-Grid Renewable Energy Conference in Manila, I asked the Director-General to summarize his primary message to key stakeholders in the process. His response could be taken as a direction for all who participate in the business of implementing renewable energy.

As a society, we need to get away from the idea that renewable power (and concomitant storage and transmission) belong only to an “alternative” niche in the overall energy picture, Amin says. The technology is now demonstrated. It has proven to be modern and reliable. It has also achieved cost-competitiveness, even lower prices, in many of its forms and is rapidly moving toward economic parity in others. Amin states:


cleantechnica
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Thu 24 Jul 2014, 17:35:51

First-Of-Its-Kind Report Ranks U.S. Electric Utility Companies’ Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Performance

A first-of-its-kind report, Benchmarking Utility Clean Energy ranks the 32 largest electric utility holding companies, which collectively account for about 68 percent of 2012 U.S. retail electricity sales, on three clean energy indicators. The report also provides data on 87 subsidiary companies – the distribution utilities to which electricity consumers pay their monthly bills. Subsidiaries’ rankings generally tracked with the rankings of their larger parent holding companies – though some outperformed or underperformed their owners and peers.

“Renewable energy and energy efficiency, two of EPA's Clean Power Plan building blocks, are increasingly cost-effective options for electric utilities seeking to lower their carbon emissions,” said Mindy Lubber, President of Ceres, a nonprofit sustainability advocacy organization, which authored the report in partnership with Clean Edge. “Our analysis shows that some utilities are beginning to deliver substantial amounts of clean energy and energy efficiency, while others are lagging.”

Among the 32 holding companies, NV Energy, Xcel, PG&E, Sempra, and Edison International were found to rank the highest for renewable energy sales, with renewable resources accounting for nearly 17 to 21 percent of their retail electricity sales in 2012. Southern Company, SCANA, Dominion, AES, and Entergy ranked at the bottom, with renewable energy sales accounting for less than two percent of each company’s total power sales. Five of the 32 companies included in this report accounted for nearly 54 percent of renewable energy sales.


ceres

Renewables now ‘mainstream’ business for US utilities, says report
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Thu 31 Jul 2014, 18:45:39

6 HUGE SOLAR AND WIND PROJECTS THAT ARE DRIVING THE WORLD'S CLEAN REVOLUTION

Global wind power capacity increased 12% last year, while solar has already achieved grid parity in France, Germany and Italy’s commercial sectors. As clean, sustainable and affordable power sources, these renewable energies are providing a viable alternative to fossil fuels and driving the global clean revolution.

Below we take a look at some of the world’s largest solar and wind projects, which are leading this transition to a low carbon economy.

AGUA CALIENTE SOLAR PROJECT

With a generating capacity of 290 megawatts, Agua Caliante is the world’s largest solar PV facility. Supported by a US Department of Energy loan worth US$967 million, construction on the plant began in Yuma County, California in 2011, creating 400 jobs in the process. The electricity generated from the 4.9 million solar panels will provide power for 100,000 American households.


theclimategroup
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Sat 16 Aug 2014, 18:19:24

New Solar & Wind Energy Resource Pages

Since they are “pages” and not “posts,” a couple of new CleanTechnica pages I just published aren’t going to feed into our home page, email newsletters, or RSS feeds, so I’m just dropping a note here to let you know that I just published these two pages:

Solar Energy Resources

Wind Energy Resources

They should be updated regularly, and as needed, I will add subheadings/sections. Rather than general “About Solar Energy” and “About Wind Energy” pages, the point of these is simply to allow me (and others) to bookmark key solar and wind energy stories that should be useful for a long time and we might want to reference or share with others repeatedly.

We also have “Solar Energy Facts” and “Wind Energy Facts” pages, but those are supposed to just share key facts rather than broader stories or information. Hopefully this isn’t getting too complicated….


cleantechnica
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Alternative Energy (general) Thread pt 3(merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Tue 14 Oct 2014, 17:13:44

Cleantech Top 100 Companies Report Released

There are many lists published today, but this one about sustainable innovation stands out. The Global Cleantech 100 acknowledges promising innovation leaders in categories like wastewater, carbon conversion, and energy. Nearly 6,000 companies were nominated to be reviewed for the top 100 by 84 external panelists. The final 100 are from 17 countries and sub-sectors. This list included the first appearance of an African company — M-KOPA from Kenya. About two-thirds of the companies are from North America. Almost 30% are from Europe.

An accompanying report with the list mentioned that the point is not to claim that the top 100 are the absolute best companies, but rather to give recognition to admirable companies that are innovators. “We therefore do not definitively state any year’s 100 to be the best or top companies in the world, as that would need a common measure or metric. They do, however, stand for where ‘consensus sentiment’ lies both in terms of which companies active in sustainable innovation are in favor and are more commonly admired, and perhaps even more importantly for what kind of sub-sectoral areas and themes are in vogue.”

Sometimes publishing lists of top organizations or individuals has an unintended consequence of offending those who were not included, so it was effective etiquette to mention that no harm was meant by focusing only on a select group.

Within the top 100, three companies stood out due to receiving the most peer validations by experts.


cleantechnica
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby DesuMaiden » Sun 26 Oct 2014, 23:19:30

I think we should start investing heavily in solar energy. I think solar energy is the only way we can generate electricity in the future. Currently most of the electricity in the USA is generated by nonrenewable energy sources (coal, natural gas and nuclear energy)...see the chart below.

http://f03.classes.colgate.edu/fsem037- ... ources.jpg

This is not good because coal, natural gas and uranium supplies are finite, and we will eventually run out of those energy sources sometime in the near future. And when we do, we can no longer generate anymore electricity.

We need to get more of our electricity from renewable energy sources like solar and wind energy. I say solar energy is better than wind because solar energy has a higher energy density.

The Earth receives 20,000 times more energy from the sun than we use in fossil fuels. But it will take solar panels covering an area of 100,000 square miles to met our energy demands from solar energy alone when we try to substitute fossil fuels as our energy source. Right now, all of the solar panels in the world only cover an area of about 10 square kilometers. So we need to build A LOT more solar panels in order to generate all of our energy from solar energy. A lot more.

But my question is do we have enough rare Earth minerals to create all of those solar panels? Currently 97% of all of all the rare earth minerals (RAM) are mined in China, and they are restricting their exports of RAM in order to use their RAM to build their own economy. I'm not sure we even have enough RAM to build enough solar panels to generate enough electricity from solar energy.

Also we need to reduce our electricity and energy consumption. We need to shrink our economy because we simply can't generate enough electricity and energy anymore. We need to use less energy in the future, thereby shrink our economy. As much as we wouldn't want to shrink our economy, we have no other choice because we simply can't generate enough energy for further economic growth. Future economic growth is impossible because we have reached peak oil, and more then likely, we will also reached peak coal, peak natural gas, and peak uranium in the near future.

The future will all be about reducing our energy consumption, and switching over to renewable sources of energy like solar, wind and biofuels energy.

So what do you say? Do you say this is a good goal to strive towards?
History repeats itself. Just everytime with different characters and players.
DesuMaiden
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 851
Joined: Mon 06 Oct 2014, 15:00:31

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby MonteQuest » Sun 26 Oct 2014, 23:35:48

DesuMaiden wrote:The future will all be about reducing our energy consumption, and switching over to renewable sources of energy like solar, wind and biofuels energy.


What energy source do you suggest we use to manufacture, ship and maintain the components of the above mentioned?
A Saudi saying, "My father rode a camel. I drive a car. My son flies a jet-plane. His son will ride a camel."
User avatar
MonteQuest
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 16299
Joined: Mon 06 Sep 2004, 02:00:00
Location: Westboro, MO

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby MonteQuest » Sun 26 Oct 2014, 23:39:39

DesuMaiden wrote:We need to shrink our economy because we simply can't generate enough electricity and energy anymore.


How will you service the debt in a contracting economy? What about credit?
A Saudi saying, "My father rode a camel. I drive a car. My son flies a jet-plane. His son will ride a camel."
User avatar
MonteQuest
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 16299
Joined: Mon 06 Sep 2004, 02:00:00
Location: Westboro, MO

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby DesuMaiden » Mon 27 Oct 2014, 01:20:31

MonteQuest wrote:
DesuMaiden wrote:The future will all be about reducing our energy consumption, and switching over to renewable sources of energy like solar, wind and biofuels energy.


What energy source do you suggest we use to manufacture, ship and maintain the components of the above mentioned?

All renewable energy needs oil for manufacture of the equipment. You need oil to manufacture and ship the components of solar panels.
History repeats itself. Just everytime with different characters and players.
DesuMaiden
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 851
Joined: Mon 06 Oct 2014, 15:00:31

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby Ulenspiegel » Mon 27 Oct 2014, 04:27:51

Desu,

the electricity that is produced by PV panels can be used to replace oil in uncritical fields like heating of buildings or short and long range transport with trucks, the solutions are heat pumps, EV and railway. Therefore, the effect is less severe.

To make a good argument you have to provide data on how much of the transport can NOT be changed to EV, keep in mind that 80% energy demand of an ICE is uded to produve waste heat. In many fields 3 units electricity replace 10 units chemical energy.

Most economies need relatively cheap energy, but this is an avarage value. To claim that the essential, i.e. not easy to replacable, part of our todays oil consumption has to be cheap is nonsense.

Again, even 400 USD/barrel makes an windturbine only <5% more expensive. You can produce most heavy parts (base, tower) locally in order to reduce transport etc.
Ulenspiegel
Lignite
Lignite
 
Posts: 260
Joined: Thu 04 Jul 2013, 02:15:29

Re: Is solar energy the solution?

Unread postby sunweb » Mon 27 Oct 2014, 06:37:11

Solar energy is simply a lateral, step down in BAU. The devices used to capture either sun of the wind are extensions of the fossil fuel supply system and a massive industrial infrastructure. The ERoEI of solar devices is very low if the whole systems input is taken into account. And once you have manufactured these devices what energy and accompanying resources will you use to replace parts (controllers, inverters, etc) and ultimately the devices themselves? And once you have the electricity (needs lots of copper - think big machines and environmental degradation) where will you get the energy and materials to build the gizmos you want the electricity to run?
There are those on this list that wave the flag for so-called renewables; the devices are not renewable, green or sustainable. They never answer these questions.
User avatar
sunweb
Peat
Peat
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Thu 04 May 2006, 02:00:00
Location: Minnesota

PreviousNext

Return to Energy Technology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests