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THE Solar Cell Thread Pt. 4 (merged)

Discussions of conventional and alternative energy production technologies.

Re: THE Solar Cell Thread Pt. 4 (merged)

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Sat 20 Aug 2022, 12:55:32

evilgenius wrote:I don't know. As a solar investor, I think it is good news that Africa is likely to invest more rather than less money in solar over the next period of time. It is more evidence that solar is going to explode, at some point. It has ceased to merely become something people talk about, but, instead, something that they put into their actual plans. As another for instance, I have notice the small town I live in starting to mention making sure they spend so much money out of the budget in that direction, and they don't just mean powering a battery operated motion sensor now and again.

If Africa does that, I wonder if it will wind up giving them huge solar fields, or if it will incentivize them to develop a grid that includes local inputs, like your house, from the start? I wonder about the difference? Some solar companies have already made a sort of decision not to try and capitalize on panel manufacture. They will capitalize on installation and making systems easier. They won't make too many things. Other companies are still making things. What strategy they choose has a lot to do with how they see the grid developing. You see people with battery systems on YouTube, but that may not be how everyone would go solar. For the most efficient grid, people might mostly sell to the grid from their roofs. But, then, would we enter into one of those "freedom" arguments, over wanting to be independent from the grid and living solely over what one can generate one's self?

For rural areas in Africa and India for that matter, I can see going to solar panels and battery system as being good investments and cheaper then upgrading the electric grid to reach them. Add in a cell phone tower and they can access the twenty first century.
On the other hand for urban areas I don't think they have the roof or ground space available to meet the demand. Of course people closer to the problem will do their own calculations to see which way to go with their money.
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Re: THE Solar Cell Thread Pt. 4 (merged)

Unread postby Newfie » Sun 21 Aug 2022, 08:39:36

High number is 15 watts/square foot.

But that depends upon where you are.


https://www.solar-electric.com/learning ... maps.html/

We have 630 watts of panel, in the tropics, and 4 GC-2 batteries. That powers our fridge, our cell phones and computers, and LED lights with some left over.

And we also have a decent wind generator and live in a very windy zone.

We could do better with lithium batteries but they are VERY expensive, complicated and insurance companies don’t like them. And our power requirements are low, very low, so we get by.

The exact same configuration in Delaware is very marginal. I would keep a 2A trickle charger running. Didn’t need it all the time but I am lazy.

IMHO the real answer is to reduce your energy requirements as much as possible. Use alternatives to do the bulk of the work, and have the grid as a backup.

That is a good personal strategy but a suck grid strategy.
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Re: THE Solar Cell Thread Pt. 4 (merged)

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Sun 21 Aug 2022, 09:01:53

Newfie wrote:High number is 15 watts/square foot.

But that depends upon where you are.


https://www.solar-electric.com/learning ... maps.html/

We have 630 watts of panel, in the tropics, and 4 GC-2 batteries. That powers our fridge, our cell phones and computers, and LED lights with some left over.

And we also have a decent wind generator and live in a very windy zone.

We could do better with lithium batteries but they are VERY expensive, complicated and insurance companies don’t like them. And our power requirements are low, very low, so we get by.

The exact same configuration in Delaware is very marginal. I would keep a 2A trickle charger running. Didn’t need it all the time but I am lazy.

IMHO the real answer is to reduce your energy requirements as much as possible. Use alternatives to do the bulk of the work, and have the grid as a backup.

That is a good personal strategy but a suck grid strategy.

I note that the charts are in KWH/m^2/day not square feet. So Vermont in December is down to about 2.5/m^2/day so if I wanted to drive a Tesla with a 75KWH battery 30 miles a day or 10% of the battery it would take 3M^2 of panels to do that and 30M^2 to get a full charge in a day. And it would take another 15M^2 to run the house with what few electrical appliances I now have. If I get forced into electric hot water and cooking that could easily double.
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