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A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt 3

Discussions of conventional and alternative energy production technologies.

Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby Newfie » Tue 20 Jul 2021, 08:19:56

I agree there is much to despair about.

I am not so sure about your prediction of how fast things will collapse. It is possible, but unlikely.

I do have the sense we are at some sort of peak and are getting glimpses of the downside.
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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby Newfie » Thu 12 Aug 2021, 08:59:06

From a practical view point we live on about 1.5kw/day from soar and wind. This is living on our sailboat in an ideal climate using very few modern conveniences and cooking with kerosene. This is occasionally supplemented with a generator running gas when there are extended rainy days and low wind.

Average American electricity use is about 30kw and that does not include gas/oil heat.
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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby theluckycountry » Fri 13 Aug 2021, 01:40:57

peripato wrote:Fossil fuels are the subsidy. The modern world, including high-tech renewables, and 6 billion+ people wouldn't be around today without it.


Bullseye alright. So few people get that. They think we have cars and smart phones because we all suddenly got Smart after after thousands of years grubbing in the dirt.
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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby theluckycountry » Fri 13 Aug 2021, 01:48:14

Outcast_Searcher wrote: If your 'renewable' system does not create enough energy surplus to do so the whole system starts decaying and falling apart pretty quickly.


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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby diemos » Fri 13 Aug 2021, 12:43:55

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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Wed 18 Aug 2021, 13:29:23

Somewhat good news in the Houston area: a new high school (Katy area) can now run 100% solar on sunny days. Obvious little demand at night when there are no classes. And still has power grid for back up. Did not report cost or payout time. Just worked the cost into the construction budget. But a fairly wealthy area: built an $80 million football stadium several years ago so obvious solar cost was no problem: looked like it covers about 1 acre at most.
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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby AdamB » Wed 18 Aug 2021, 16:37:34

Newfie wrote:I agree there is much to despair about.


Always has been. Probably always will be. Smoke'im while you got'im.

Newfie wrote:I do have the sense we are at some sort of peak and are getting glimpses of the downside.


Yup. I remember folks saying the same thing way back during the peak oil days. The more things change, the more they stay the same. Sort of like groundhog day in peakerville?
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A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt 3

Unread postby Tanada » Thu 28 Oct 2021, 11:58:05

The Limits to Renewable Energy - Urban Insight

What would a world with a 100 per cent renewable energy mix look like? And which are the limits to integrate renewable energy? In order to slow the pace of global warming and achieve a sustainable society it is clear that we need to increase the share of renewable energy globally. But today the integration of renewables is still progressing very slowly in many countries. The report “The Limits to Renewable Energy” explores the use of renewables today and the obstacles for further expansion.

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has confirmed that the effects of a 1 degree increase in global average temperature are already being felt globally but also, that the most severe effects of global warming can be avoided if action is taken now.

Common examples of climate mitigation include reducing energy demand and shifting energy production from fossil fuels to renewable energy. But what are the limits to integrating renewable energy? And what does a world with a 100 per cent renewable energy mix look like?

DIFFERENT RENEWABLES IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES?

While some countries have a very high share of renewable energy, others still rely heavily on coal, oil and gas. But there are also great differences when it comes to the mix of different renewables. For example, Norway has a very high share of hydropower while its Nordic neighbour Denmark has much more wind power.

A number of factors can explain a country’s preference for one type of technology over another. Academic research indicates that growth in renewable energy in any specific country is less motivated by climate change concerns or fossil fuel costs, and more by the presence of strong lobby groups looking to support national industry.

National industry is in turn more likely to have grown where there are natural resources to support the early development of an industry. For example, the biomass boiler industry in Austria and the wind turbine industries in Germany and Denmark. Public interest and acceptance for particular types of renewable energy are driven by multiple factors, including support of local jobs and industry, visual impacts and public awareness of climate change.

CHALLENGES IN INCREASING RENEWABLES PENETRATION

There are a number of challenges associated with building a renewable energy system. For example when it comes to transmission of electricity, heating and transport. But there are also social, economic and political aspects that need to be taken into account. In order to increase the penetration of renewables worldwide innovative solutions to these problems are required.

ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION

Maximum renewable energy penetration will bring with it a massive transformation of electricity networks and the way electrical power is transmitted, generated and sold. The electricity system of the future needs to be highly flexible to rapidly adjust to the variable power output of renewable energy sources.

In addition to effects on generation and transmission, characteristics of renewable energy converters disrupt the way conventional electricity markets function. Market structures need to evolve to integrate renewable power properly.

HEAT AND TRANSPORT

Energy consumption for heat and transport is a significant proportion of overall energy use in Europe. However, these are both sectors that have traditionally been heavily reliant on fossil fuels – for transport, through the use of petrol and diesel-fuelled cars; and for heating, through the use of oil and natural gas boilers in buildings.

To decarbonise transport, we either need to incorporate biofuels, such as biodiesel, or switch to hybrid, electric or hydrogen cars. For heating, particularly in urban areas, the main approaches are through district heating or electrification of heat, or a combination of the two.

SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS

On a local level, societies may benefit from municipal and community-owned renewable energy schemes. In such schemes, the centralised nature of power is decentralised, giving end-users more control over the whole system.

On a national level, renewable energy may create new jobs in the industry and support moves towards a long-term sustainable development plan with lower risks associated with fuel import volatility, carbon prices and political tensions. This is particularly true where countries are highly dependent on fuel imports.

The trade in electricity between countries is less prone to political tension than trade involving oil and gas. Naturally, some countries have more energy resources than others, but differences in electricity resources are smaller than those relating to fossil fuel reserves.

Climate change is likely to affect future migration patterns. The latest IPCC report described the African continent as the one that will be most affected by climate change. As a consequence, Europe is likely to see increasing amounts of climate refugees. At the moment, Finland and Sweden are the only countries in the world with an official policy concerning environmental migrants in their official immigration and asylum policies. This may be subject to change as weather trends become increasingly less predictable and more severe and the number of “climate change refugees” increases.

The cost of renewable power has been decreasing for decades and dropping faster than anticipated. Now, renewable power uptake is increasing the electricity prices and requires government support. However, in the long term, as technology matures, the costs of running an entire energy system on renewable energy will be lower and subsidies on fossil fuels are likely to fall away.

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

We already have the technologies, the proven business cases and the infrastructure to support wider integration of renewables into energy systems. What is holding us back? Who is holding us back?

For some, there is a fear that the scale of available renewables is insufficient to meet all of our energy demands. What happens if we go down the route towards 100 per cent renewables? The goal is not to cover and crowd the landscape and let the horizon to disappear under tens of thousands of solar panels or large wind turbines, but instead use renewable sources in smart ways. To meet future demands we need to create more interactions between sectors and systems.

One of the biggest challenges in the energy sector is matching the timings between generation and consumption of energy. On a “good” energy day, the sun blazes and the wind howls and fills our electricity grid with cheap, renewable energy. On a “bad” energy day, the skies are grey and the wind is still and we rely on backup from hydro or conventional generation. On good days we should also be furiously energetic and use as much energy as we can – and on bad days we should turn to quieter pursuits.

Digitalisation, energy storage and demand response are the keys to helping future energy systems maintain balance as we move from separate energy consumption. The generation of energy for heat, electricity and transport is interconnected through storage, monitored through smart meters, and changed through voluntary shifting of demand.

Time is running out to make unprecedented changes to the way we work and live if we want to continue to work and live in a world that resembles the one we have today.

All over the world initiatives are being taken to minimise carbon emissions and the impacts of climate change. The increase of renewable energy is key to achieving a climate neutral, sustainable future and it’s a solution that is already being implemented in many different countries. The limits to renewables are not technical, or financial, or regulatory – they are the ones we set for ourselves and for each other.


the-limits-to-renewable-energy/
Alfred Tennyson wrote:We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Mon 08 Nov 2021, 11:44:32

From the post above:
On a local level, societies may benefit from municipal and community-owned renewable energy schemes. In such schemes, the centralised nature of power is decentralised, giving end-users more control over the whole system.

That sentence is a contradiction within itself.
Government owning or managing anything is a sure way to increase costs and removes control and options from the end users hands.
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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Mon 08 Nov 2021, 15:04:41

vt - But we no doubt will hear how successful such efforts prove to be. Consider the Post Office. After announcing it was going to increase first class mail delivery by several days it wasn't 2 weeks before it proudly claimed it was hitting delivery schedules 91% of the time. All it had to do was change the expected timing to meet what it had been doing and SHAZAM!!!...success. LMFAO.
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Re: A Critical Discussion the Limits to Renewable Energy Pt

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Mon 08 Nov 2021, 21:54:11

ROCKMAN wrote:vt - But we no doubt will hear how successful such efforts prove to be. Consider the Post Office. After announcing it was going to increase first class mail delivery by several days it wasn't 2 weeks before it proudly claimed it was hitting delivery schedules 91% of the time. All it had to do was change the expected timing to meet what it had been doing and SHAZAM!!!...success. LMFAO.

Aah Yup they will move the goalposts as much as needed to make their fumble become a score.
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