Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

Sea Level Rise Pt. 3

Re: Sea Level Rise Pt. 3

Unread postby dohboi » Fri 19 Jun 2020, 06:21:55

Good catch, Keith.

It highlights how many unknowns there are with sea level rise, and how fast some of the changes might happen. New research over the last ten years that I've seen on the issue all point the same direction as this piece--glacier collapse can happen at a stunningly rapid (non-glacial!) rate.
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 19318
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: Sea Level Rise Pt. 3

Unread postby rockdoc123 » Fri 19 Jun 2020, 14:16:28

The article in question points to the conditions of sediment and rock material at the base of particular glaciers. This impacts basal friction and there are many other factors that affect basal friction including the presence of melt, rock and ice asperities, elevation changes etc. When the forces of gravitational spreading (a consequence of increased snowfall and accumulation), coupled with basal melt exceed the coefficient of sliding friction at the glacier base it will surge. That surge is very short term and the system returns to its previous state relatively quickly, so quickly that researchers have been hard-pressed to document glacial surges in the field. This has absolutely zero to due with climate. Glaciers in Antarctica and everywhere else have always had periods of surge followed by periods of much slower flow. This has been documented in a number of papers regarding both the peninsula and West Antarctica. The measured rates of flow and resultant net mass balance of Antarctica have been documented in numerous papers over the past decade. Those rates are averages over the period of measurement so by default they take into account numerous surge events as well as periods where ice flow has slowed below average rate. There is nothing demonstrated in this paper that would suggest either more frequent surges or continuing surges.
User avatar
rockdoc123
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 7663
Joined: Mon 16 May 2005, 02:00:00

Previous

Return to Environment, Weather & Climate

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests