Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

The Greenland Thread

Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby Newfie » Tue 12 Mar 2019, 18:55:45

And I just point out it may have been a local condition not overall climate change.

Let’s just drop it, I’m totally confused at what you were driving at.
User avatar
Newfie
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 12024
Joined: Thu 15 Nov 2007, 03:00:00
Location: Between Canada and Carribean

Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby jawagord » Tue 12 Mar 2019, 19:12:10

Interesting study linking D-O events to Norwegian Sea ice. Basically the abrupt warming event is due to reduction in Norwegian Sea ice cover, not Arctic sea ice or Antarctica.

Greenland ice core records reveal that the last glacial period was marked by abrupt climate changes, leading to alternating cold Greenland stadials (GS) and warmer Greenland interstadials (GI), known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles (1, 2). These D-O climate fluctuations involved dramatic changes in northern high-latitude air temperature, hydroclimate, and atmospheric circulation transitioning in a matter of decades (2–4), and also affected Eurasian (5) and tropical climates (6).

We conclude that the glacial sea ice variability in the Norwegian Sea acted as an important factor that contributed to abrupt glacial changes in ocean circulation and climate in the North Atlantic and over Greenland. We suggest that sea ice reduction and resumption of deep-water formation in the Nordic Seas may have played a persistent role in triggering the abrupt GS-GI climate transitions, terminating both “normal” stadials and “most extreme” stadials that were characterized by severe iceberg surges and collapse of deep-water formation in the North Atlantic and extreme AMOC breakdowns, as, for example, associated with Heinrich Event 4 during GS9 (8, 10). This corroborates previous hypotheses that relate the D-O warming events observed in Greenland ice cores to changes in Nordic Seas sea ice cover.

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/3/eaau6174

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/ ... .large.jpg
Don't deny the peak!
jawagord
Peat
Peat
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Mon 29 May 2017, 09:49:17

GIS

Unread postby Whitefang » Thu 21 Mar 2019, 06:53:39

https://paulbeckwith.net/

Paul on GIS collapse and SLR, Earth spasms from profoundly abrupt CC.

Interesting coupling as the GIS collapses, WAIS follows. Southwest Greenland first as we already see the breaking up of cubic mile large blocks of ice forming there. Will produce very large tsunamis alike the one that will follow from one of the canary islands sliding into the Atlantic ocean.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=ca ... &FORM=VIRE

I thought the GIS does not have a lot of large glaciers terminating at sea like the WAIS and I read a study, at least the presentation of the WAIS collapsing before the GIS, a million years ago. 2008 study...
Paul thinks tsunamis from calving ice sheets moved 600 ton boulders up the beach, Hanson, James thinks those storms of our grandchildren did it.....we'll see soon enough.

https://www.slideserve.com/tender/wais- ... s-collapse

I think if we see the death of the arctic sea ice next decade, we will see the GIS starting to collapse soon after, that immense chunk of ice is fragile and will response to a sudden large uptick in sea surface temperature.
No, the arctic will not instantly boil over but a 10 degree increase in average temp. will change about everything.
Imagine the huge extremes that will follow, no more moderation of sea ice, stable jet and so on.
User avatar
Whitefang
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 546
Joined: Fri 12 May 2006, 02:00:00

Re: GIS

Unread postby Newfie » Thu 21 Mar 2019, 07:16:55

Whitefang wrote:https://paulbeckwith.net/

Paul on GIS collapse and SLR, Earth spasms from profoundly abrupt CC.

Interesting coupling as the GIS collapses, WAIS follows. Southwest Greenland first as we already see the breaking up of cubic mile large blocks of ice forming there. Will produce very large tsunamis alike the one that will follow from one of the canary islands sliding into the Atlantic ocean.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=ca ... &FORM=VIRE

I thought the GIS does not have a lot of large glaciers terminating at sea like the WAIS and I read a study, at least the presentation of the WAIS collapsing before the GIS, a million years ago. 2008 study...
Paul thinks tsunamis from calving ice sheets moved 600 ton boulders up the beach, Hanson, James thinks those storms of our grandchildren did it.....we'll see soon enough.

https://www.slideserve.com/tender/wais- ... s-collapse

I think if we see the death of the arctic sea ice next decade, we will see the GIS starting to collapse soon after, that immense chunk of ice is fragile and will response to a sudden large uptick in sea surface temperature.
No, the arctic will not instantly boil over but a 10 degree increase in average temp. will change about everything.
Imagine the huge extremes that will follow, no more moderation of sea ice, stable jet and so on.


White,

Something wrong there. No cubic mile ice sheets to break up on SW Greenland.

I have seen large (LARGE) flat ice sheet bergs from Greenland, not sure exactly how the propagated. Some years ago (2010?) there was a big hunk of ice shelf break up off NW Greenland. This may be a remnant I photoed in 2012.

DEABBB98-880B-46A9-B830-F075A9F11C02.jpeg
DEABBB98-880B-46A9-B830-F075A9F11C02.jpeg (820.97 KiB) Viewed 145 times
User avatar
Newfie
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 12024
Joined: Thu 15 Nov 2007, 03:00:00
Location: Between Canada and Carribean

Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Thu 21 Mar 2019, 09:18:39

People need to remember that Greenland is ringed by mountains that rise to above 10,000 ft elevation with only a few gaps for ice and water to flow from the interior out to the sea and only the Jakobshavn glacier on the south west side of the island being south of the arctic circle. The ice pack in the middle rises to 10,500 ft above sea level and is held there like an egg cradled in the palm of your hand with your fingers being the mountains. While there is plenty of ice on the ocean facing sides of the mountains that could melt as fast as temperatures (both air and sea water) rise the vast bulk in the center is going to sit there for a long time reguardless.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_m ... _Greenland
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6990
From the second link"
Morlighem's team used the maps to refine their estimate of Greenland's total volume of ice and its potential to add to global sea level rise, if the ice were to melt completely -- which is not expected to occur within the next few hundred years. The new estimate is higher by 2.76 inches (7 centimeters) for a total of 24.34 feet (7.42 meters).
User avatar
vtsnowedin
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 9646
Joined: Fri 11 Jul 2008, 02:00:00

Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby jawagord » Thu 21 Mar 2019, 11:51:45

vtsnowedin wrote:People need to remember that Greenland is ringed by mountains that rise to above 10,000 ft elevation with only a few gaps for ice and water to flow from the interior out to the sea and only the Jakobshavn glacier on the south west side of the island being south of the arctic circle. The ice pack in the middle rises to 10,500 ft above sea level and is held there like an egg cradled in the palm of your hand with your fingers being the mountains. While there is plenty of ice on the ocean facing sides of the mountains that could melt as fast as temperatures (both air and sea water) rise the vast bulk in the center is going to sit there for a long time reguardless.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_m ... _Greenland
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6990
From the second link"
Morlighem's team used the maps to refine their estimate of Greenland's total volume of ice and its potential to add to global sea level rise, if the ice were to melt completely -- which is not expected to occur within the next few hundred years. The new estimate is higher by 2.76 inches (7 centimeters) for a total of 24.34 feet (7.42 meters).


Many people here don’t understand Greenland accumulates more ice mass from snow each winter than melts each summer. It’s only gravity pushing the massive heights of ice toward the ocean that yields a small “net” loss each year and a tiny unmeasurable increase in sea level. While it’s imposible for all this ice to flow to the ocean per mountainous terrain, if we assumed it could it would take 15,000 years to lose all this ice at the average loss rate used by DMI.

Based on this data, it can be seen that during the period 2003-2011 the Greenland Ice Sheet has lost 234 km3 of water per year, corresponding to an annual contribution to the mean increase in sea level of 0.65 mm (Barletta et al. (2013).

http://polarportal.dk/fileadmin/polarpo ... 190320.png
Don't deny the peak!
jawagord
Peat
Peat
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Mon 29 May 2017, 09:49:17

Previous

Return to Environment, Weather & Climate

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests