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Deluge Thread 2018

Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby dohboi » Mon 09 Jul 2018, 20:48:57

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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby dohboi » Tue 31 Jul 2018, 21:40:00

Another one to add to the long file labeled: "faster (more intense...) than expected consequences of AGW":

Australia facing extremely intense rain storms.
Landmark study shows how heavy, short rain storms are intensifying more rapidly than would be expected with global warming. Jul 30, 2018. Newcastle University
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 120245.htm

The team of international scientists, led by Dr Selma Guerreiro at the School of Engineering, Newcastle University, UK, has for the first time found increases in short, intense rain storms over Australia over the past 50 years.
The storms are substantially larger than would be expected under climate change.
Published today in Nature Climate Change, the study shows that in Australia:
1, Extreme daily rainfall events are increasing as would be expected from the levels of regional or global warming that we are experiencing
2. the amount of water falling in hourly rain storms (for example thunderstorms) is increasing at a rate 2 to 3 times higher than expected, with the most extreme events showing the largest increases.
3. large increase has implications for the frequency and severity of flash floods, particularly if the rate stays the same into the future.

Professor Seth Westra, co-author from the University of Adelaide, Australia, said:
“These changes are well above what engineers currently take into account when determining Australia’s flood planning levels or designing stormwater management and flood defence infrastructure.
“If we keep seeing this rate of change, we risk committing future generations to levels of flood risk that are unacceptable by today’s standards.”
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby jedrider » Thu 23 Aug 2018, 11:07:13

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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 05 Sep 2018, 23:40:38

https://watchers.news/2018/09/05/151-de ... d-drought/

North Korea hit by devastating floods after unprecedented drought
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby Keith_McClary » Fri 07 Sep 2018, 23:55:12

Fifty-six million years ago, the Pyrenees were being formed, and their foothills were traversed by small isolated channels in a floodplain where they deposited highly fertile alluvium, promoting the development of vegetation whose roots would anchor the soil. Leaving the Pyrenean piedmont, these small rivers then headed west into the Atlantic, which was then only about 30 kilometres away.

"With global warming, the landscape changed completely. The channel-forming floods, which occur on average every two to three years and whose flow we have been able to measure, went up to 14 times greater than before when the climate was cooler," explains Sébastien Castelltort. During the PETM, rivers constantly changed course, they no longer adapted to increased discharge by incising their bed, but instead, they widened, sometimes dramatically, from 15 to 160 meters wide in the most extreme case. Instead of being trapped in the floodplains, the alluvium was transferred directly toward the ocean, and the vegetation seemed to disappear. The landscape turned into arid extensive gravel plains, crossed by ephemeral and torrential rivers.

and
Co-author Professor Rich Pancost from Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, explained how these findings agree with a range of geological and chemical features of the Palaeocene-Eocene global warming.

He said: "This warming event is associated with major changes in how soil and sediment were eroded and moved around the landscape.

"In many places, river systems that had been transporting silt or sand became associated with fist-sized rocks or even boulders; and more sediment was transported to and buried in coastal margins. In some locations, the rate of sediment accumulation increased by a factor of ten. But at the same time, there is also evidence that these systems became more arid.

"Our climate simulations reconcile this for many locations, showing an increase in aridity with fewer but more intense rainfall events. Those events were likely responsible for increased energy in these systems, moving around more material and larger objects. Ultimately it flushed more sediment to the ocean, causing eutrophication, blooms of algae and in some cases hypoxia."
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby dohboi » Thu 20 Sep 2018, 01:45:12

Millions More Americans Face Flood Risks Than Previously Thought

https://eos.org/opinions/millions-more- ... ly-thought

A New Approach to Calculating the 100-Year Floodplain

Over the past 5 years, researchers across the globe have started to develop a set of these alternative top-down approaches to flood inundation modeling over vast areas, taking advantage of increasingly available large data sets and high-performance computing resources. These methods take available digital elevation models (DEMs), river hydrography, and gauging station data and use them to automatically create flood inundation models of whole regions, countries, or even the world.
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 10 Oct 2018, 06:27:53

At least eight people including two Britons were killed as heavy rain and flash floods hit the Spanish island of Mallorca late on Tuesday, authorities said.


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-spai ... SKCN1MK0JQ
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby dohboi » Tue 16 Oct 2018, 19:38:28

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpic ... 34740.html

At least 12 people have been killed in violent storms which lashed southwest France in some of the deadliest flooding in years.

Local authorities revised the official death toll downwards from the previous total of 13, which had earlier been issued by the interior ministry.

Two more people are still missing, with eight seriously injured.

President Emmanuel Macron offered "the sympathy and solidarity of the entire nation for the victims of the Aude flooding and their families".

The flooding swept away cars, gutted streets and battered buildings and bridges.

With so many roads being impassable, helicopters were deployed to rescue those who were still stranded.
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby dohboi » Mon 29 Oct 2018, 21:32:01

Venice Hit With Worst Flooding In A Decade As Tourists Wade Through Landmarks

The floodwaters have climbed to some 156 centimeters, or a little more than 5 feet, above normal, according to city statistics ― the highest recorded water level since December 2008. The tide is expected to be several feet above normal for much of this week, Venice officials said.

Italy is dealing with a spate of foul weather, and at least six people have been killed nationwide as flooding and heavy winds buffet the region, downing trees and causing widespread mayhem. Schools and popular tourist sites were also closed in Rome, including the Colosseum and the Roman Forum.


https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ve ... e6eecd163a
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby Plantagenet » Thu 01 Nov 2018, 03:57:14

I’m in Venice right now.

I arrived just at the start of the Alta aqua event a couple of days ago. The trains were boogered up in NE Italy, with delays and cancellations, but I eventually made connections and rolled into Santa Lucia train station about 6 pm on an almost empty train. Outside the train station was a phalanxe of immigrants selling very flimsy little plastic bags to put over your feet. I got past them only to find the sidewalks were under about a foot of water. But wait! Venice puts up raised wooden walkways about two feet above the sidewalk during these events so I got on the wood walkway and made it to the first bridge over the Grand Canal. My hotel was on the other side so I started over.

Then the skies opened up and wind and rain hit. In a second I was sopped through, still dragging my bag up the bridge steps. Eventually I made it over but on the other side there were no walkways....just flooded sidewalks every where.

I was so cold and wet I ducked into a trattoria, and had something to eat and drink while I checked the map to see where my hotel was. But when I went back out the door the water had risen another foot, and was coming up quickly. I went back into the trattoria and changed into my shorts and teva sandals and started wading through the water, carrying my bag to keep it out of the water. After a bit I came to a church and climbed up the stairs out the water.

The shoppes all had little metal barriers about two feet high they put in their doors. You could step over but water also seeped in along the sides.

I pushed on into the water again, and eventually reached my hotel. The water by now was so high they had raised their barrier and put in a little metal staircase up and over the barrier and into the hotel lobby. About 3” of water in the lobby. All the tables and chairs were stacked up, the elevator was out of order, and the piano had been lifted up onto milk crates.

I went up to my room to warm up again, and then came down to photograph everything. I got some great shots of miserable people carrying their bags and complacent locals out for a stroll.

In the hotel people started playing the piano and singing show tunes. I got a beer and found a milk crate and took a seat by the window and sand every song from The Sound of Music with 10 other travelers. One person knew Dave Brubec jazz so he played that for a while.

All in all it was mostly exciting and grand. I had a wonderful time in the flood. It all felt a little bit like the Titantic with the water rising and people ignoring it to sing silly songs. Apparently it was the fourth highest flood event here ever. I’m still in Venice and another big aqua Alta event is predicted this evening.

Of course it wasn’t all fun. They shut down the water bus system, and people were stranded everywhere. Many people couldn’t get to their hotels and slept in the train station. Now I just hope it clears before tomorrow, when my train leaves. I do NOT want to carry my bags on my head again wading through the water with torrential rain beating down.

Cheers!
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby Newfie » Thu 01 Nov 2018, 06:02:04

PlAnt, do you know if they operated the flood gates at the Lido? I understand they would do no good for rain, but I thought the main bit of flooding was because of storm surge.

Ah, never mind, I looked it up. It seems the project has been built but not “completed” whatever that means. It sounds like they have tested the system but did whatever reason it has not been put into operation. In fact it was designed for just such events as this one. They are now saying 2020. With no definition of what needs to be done. Perhaps statue of limitations to run out?
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby Plantagenet » Fri 02 Nov 2018, 11:48:19

Newfie wrote:PlAnt, do you know if they operated the flood gates at the Lido? I understand they would do no good for rain, but I thought the main bit of flooding was because of storm surge.

Ah, never mind, I looked it up. It seems the project has been built but not “completed” whatever that means. It sounds like they have tested the system but did whatever reason it has not been put into operation. In fact it was designed for just such events as this one. They are now saying 2020. With no definition of what needs to be done. Perhaps statue of limitations to run out?


Yup. I also heard the barrier flood control project isn’t finished and may never be finished.

Last time I was in Venice the little wooden walkways to raise people above the flooded streets were elevated by about ten inches. Now they’ve got bigger walkways that elevate you about two feet above the sidewalk—-and those walkways were under water at the height of aqua Alta event.

The Venetians themselves were out walking around and doing the passegiata in their rubber hip boots during the flood, and when the waters went down they quickly mopped out the shoppes and wiped off the merchandise and re-opened for business. Pretty much everything was back to normal within 24 hours of the big flood.

Cheers!
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Fri 02 Nov 2018, 12:10:38

The residents of many towns and cities in Florida and other Gulf States seem to be developing similar attitudes about rising waters. Build with flood resistent materials, develope a plan for cleanup, and try to be the first one open after the flood.

I talked with many residents of Nantucket who are not so sanguine. Parts of the town date from the 1600s and are almost 400 years old. But last Winter the pounding surf in the harbor entered the storm sewers, which unfortunately are very old cast iron and corrugated steel, and are now seeing salt water corrosion. I saw videos of salt water spraying out of street drains on the cobblestoned streets with each driven wave. It seems unlikely that the lower elevation parts of Nantucket Town will ever reach 500 years of age.
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby Tanada » Fri 02 Nov 2018, 19:51:03

In the last four days in NW Ohio my rain gauge measured 3+5/8" rainfall. aka 92 mm of rainfall.
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Re: Deluge Thread 2018

Unread postby dohboi » Fri 02 Nov 2018, 21:42:05

Thanks for the info, Plant. Wow!

Stay safe!
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