Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby Newfie » Fri 25 May 2018, 05:53:48

Yes, it is quite interesting if not alarming.

A very, very different view of the living world.

We are such a tiny spec in the whole chain of life.

It redefines biodiversity for me.
User avatar
Newfie
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 11090
Joined: Thu 15 Nov 2007, 03:00:00
Location: US East Coast

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Mon 11 Jun 2018, 14:26:31

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... se-britain

Chris Packham warns of 'ecological apocalypse' in Britain

Springwatch presenter says Britain is increasingly ‘a green and unpleasant land’



Birdwatchers have noticed the skies are particularly lacking swifts this year, a summer migrant that is declining at an increasing rate – 51% over 20 years but 25% in the five years to 2015.

Swifts are usually seen in 38% of the bird sightings logged with the British Trust for Ornithology in early June. This year they account for just 31%.
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 17 Jun 2018, 11:22:32

Britain's insects in catastrophic decline

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... on-decline
Our creepy crawlies may have unsettling looks but they lie at the foot of a wildlife food chain that makes them vitally important to the makeup and nature of the countryside. They are “the little things that run the world” according to the distinguished Harvard biologist Edward O Wilson, who once observed:

“If all humankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the rich state of equilibrium that existed 10,000 years ago. If insects were to vanish, the environment would collapse into chaos.”
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby onlooker » Wed 01 Aug 2018, 13:53:05

Time is running out in the tropics: Researchers warn of global biodiversity collapse


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 085918.htm
Last edited by Tanada on Thu 02 Aug 2018, 16:38:47, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: fixed broken quote
"We are mortal beings doomed to die
User avatar
onlooker
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 9650
Joined: Sun 10 Nov 2013, 12:49:04
Location: NY, USA

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Thu 02 Aug 2018, 03:49:09

Thanks for that, ol.

I was wondering if folks could chime in on what they are seeing in their backyards and regions wrt biodiversity, especially for insects. I feel like I've seen a few more monarchs this year than in previous recent years, but maybe I've just gotten used to seeing so few. But bee populations definitely continue to be lower than they were ten years ago.

How about where you live?
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby Ibon » Thu 02 Aug 2018, 06:39:48

dohboi wrote:
How about where you live?


One of our happy german entomologists.

Image
Last edited by Ibon on Thu 02 Aug 2018, 06:48:26, edited 1 time in total.
Our resiliency resembles an invasive weed. We are the Kudzu Ape
blog: http://blog.mounttotumas.com/
website: http://www.mounttotumas.com
User avatar
Ibon
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 6537
Joined: Fri 03 Dec 2004, 03:00:00
Location: Volcan, Panama

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby Ibon » Thu 02 Aug 2018, 06:47:23

Major reasons for collapse of insect biodiversity in Europe

1) intensive agriculture reducing remnant native habitat
2) agricultural petro chemicals
3) Electric lights at night disrupting reproductive biology of lepidoptera (light pollution)

Basically in Europe we have so efficiently converted native ecosystems over to artificial monoculture landscapes of human ecosystems what else would you expect to happen?

We need to debilitate the human juggernaut.

Imagine all those weeds colonizing one day all that vast mono culture agricultural land. All those larvae feeding once again on a diverse medley of plants. All those beetle grubs once again feeding on fallen deadwood and roots.

In the grand scheme of things Kudzu Ape is a blip on the map. Wont last much longer.

Maybe climate change will be a wedge to get the ball rolling?
Our resiliency resembles an invasive weed. We are the Kudzu Ape
blog: http://blog.mounttotumas.com/
website: http://www.mounttotumas.com
User avatar
Ibon
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 6537
Joined: Fri 03 Dec 2004, 03:00:00
Location: Volcan, Panama

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Thu 02 Aug 2018, 09:42:41

"We need to debilitate the human juggernaut."

Nicely put!
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby onlooker » Mon 13 Aug 2018, 20:02:05

Humanity Has Killed 83% of All Wild Mammals and Half of All Plants: Study


https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/conten ... aign=share
"We are mortal beings doomed to die
User avatar
onlooker
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 9650
Joined: Sun 10 Nov 2013, 12:49:04
Location: NY, USA

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 15 Aug 2018, 23:38:37

Thanks for that link, ol.

The destruction is all around us, but mostly most of us don't see it, or choose not to.

https://www.kqed.org/science/1929188/bi ... ate-change

Bird Species Collapse in the Mojave, Driven by Climate Change
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Thu 16 Aug 2018, 03:03:56

Animals are going extinct 1,000 to 10,000 faster than you’d expect if no humans lived on Earth.

Sixty percent of primate species, our closest relatives on the tree of life, are threatened with extinction.


https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/ ... imals-pnas
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 26 Sep 2018, 03:24:00

Just another example showing that we are f'ing the living planet in many ways beyond even the catastrophe of AGW:

N. American amphibian decline not primarily driven by climate change, but more directly by land use changes going back a century or more.

" these declines are a continuation of losses of amphibian populations that have been occurring since the 19th century when human land-use began destroying their habitats."

"The researchers determined that, while climate change likely has been and will be a factor in the decline of some local populations such as in the Rocky Mountain West—where the effect of a warming climate seems to be more severe for amphibians—it is not responsible for the current declines that are occurring."

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-climate-m ... cline.html

The paper is open access. The patterns it describes are quite complex:

"While we demonstrate that amphibian communities are sensitive to changes in climate, our results suggest that changing climate is not the proximate cause for ongoing assemblage-wide declines that have been observed in North American amphibians. Instead, we find that recent change in climate is a strong predictor of why local species richness is declining more quickly in some regions and that positive effects of climate may be buffering declines in other regions. For 37% of studied locations, we predicted that local species richness would have increased if climate was the primary factor determining changes in amphibian communities. We cannot eliminate factors we have not tested here. However, it would be surprising to find so many climate “winners” in our analysis if climate was a primary driver of the severe declines being observed in North American amphibian populations."

doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-06157-6

One of many reasons that I think it is possible that the living earth may never recover from the Great Mass Extinction Event we have perpetrated on her--it is really multiple mass extinction events rolled into one. The earth has never experienced anything like that since complex life evolved. So we can have no way to know if or when it will ever recover.
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Fri 28 Sep 2018, 06:35:50

Again, who needs climate change to kill the living planet when we have all these other means?

Orca 'apocalypse': half of killer whales doomed to die from pollution

Banned PCB chemicals are still severely harming the animals – but Arctic could be a refuge

At least half of the world’s killer whale populations are doomed to extinction due to toxic and persistent pollution of the oceans, according to a major new study.

Although the poisonous chemicals, PCBs, have been banned for decades, they are still leaking into the seas. They become concentrated up the food chain; as a result, killer whales, the top predators, are the most contaminated animals on the planet. Worse, their fat-rich milk passes on very high doses to their newborn calves.

PCB concentrations found in killer whales can be 100 times safe levels and severely damage reproductive organs, cause cancer and damage the immune system. The new research analysed the prospects for killer whale populations over the next century and found those offshore from industrialised nations could vanish as soon as 30-50 years.

Among those most at risk are the UK’s last pod, where a recent death revealed one of the highest PCB levels ever recorded. Others off Gibraltar, Japan and Brazil and in the north-east Pacific are also in great danger. Killer whales are one of the most widespread mammals on earth but have already been lost in the North Sea, around Spain and many other places.

The new research, published in the journal Science, examined PCB contamination in 351 killer whales, the largest analysis yet. The scientists then took existing data on how PCBs affect calf survival and immune systems in whales and used this to model how populations will fare in the future.

“Populations of Japan, Brazil, Northeast Pacific, Strait of Gibraltar, and the United Kingdom are all tending toward complete collapse,” they concluded.



http://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6409/1373


PCB—still a problem

Until they were recognized as highly toxic and carcinogenic, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were once used widely. Their production was banned in the United States in 1978, though they are still produced globally and persist in the environment. Persistent organic compounds, like PCBs, magnify across trophic levels, and thus apex predators are particularly susceptible to their ill effects. Desforges et al. looked at the continuing impact of PCBs on one of the largest marine predators, the killer whale. Using globally available data, the authors found high concentrations of PCBs within killer whale tissues. These are likely to precipitate declines across killer whale populations, particularly those that feed at high trophic levels and are the closest to industrialized areas.


Science, this issue p. 1373
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 17 Oct 2018, 21:47:22

It Will Take Millions of Years for Mammals to Recover From Us

In less than 130,000 years, humans have sawed off the most evolutionarily distinct branches from our family tree.


https://www.theatlantic.com/science/arc ... COJXUrNolU
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 17652
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Biodiversity thread Pt. 2(merged)

Unread postby M_B_S » Fri 19 Oct 2018, 01:51:06

>11 homo sapiens per km^2 on earth

Boooom!
User avatar
M_B_S
Intermediate Crude
Intermediate Crude
 
Posts: 3699
Joined: Sat 20 Aug 2005, 02:00:00

Previous

Return to Environment, Weather & Climate

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests