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Natural gas flaring

Discussions of conventional and alternative energy production technologies.

Natural gas flaring

Unread postby zoidberg » Tue 18 Mar 2008, 19:19:19

Is there any relationship between the amount of natural gas flared and the rate of production from an oil field? Or is it a characteristic unique to each oil field?
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Re: Natural gas flaring

Unread postby joeltrout » Tue 18 Mar 2008, 20:24:28

It is totally unique to the field.

Some oil fields don't flare any natural gas while others flare a lot of natural gas.

Not all gas is flared. If there is a market for the gas then it is captured and sold. Gas is usually only flared when there is not a market for it and it is more expensive to pump it back into the ground.

It is also very regulated. Some areas cannot flare due to environmental reasons.

This is a good book for an intro to the oil and gas industry if you would like to learn more about it.

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Flare Mining – Turning Waste Natural Gas into an Alternative

Unread postby AdamB » Wed 14 Feb 2018, 11:19:27


Flare Mining’s innovative, flare gas capture and processing systems turn raw associated gas and from a waste into digital currency income. Gas flaring is the combustion of associated gas produced with crude oil or from gas fields. The impact of gas flaring is of local and global concern. Gas flaring is one of the most challenging energy and environmental problems facing the world today whether regionally or globally. It is a multi-billion dollar waste, a local environmental catastrophe and a global energy and environmental problem which has persisted for decades. The option to release gas to the atmosphere by flaring and venting is an essential practice in oil and gas production, primarily for safety reasons. Flaring is the controlled burning of natural gas produced in association with oil in the course of routine oil and gas production operations. Venting is the controlled


Flare Mining – Turning Waste Natural Gas into an Alternative Store of Value
Peak oil in 2020: And here is why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Re: Natural gas flaring

Unread postby coffeeguyzz » Wed 14 Feb 2018, 18:37:16

Several innovative, smaller outfits have come up with hardware to capture and liquify onsite gas from unconventional wells.

I have yet to hear of any who have been widely adopted by the industry.
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Re: Natural gas flaring

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Thu 15 Feb 2018, 14:22:43

coffeeguyzz wrote:Several innovative, smaller outfits have come up with hardware to capture and liquify onsite gas from unconventional wells.

I have yet to hear of any who have been widely adopted by the industry.

This is an example, of IMO, where regulators need to do their jobs and FORCE oil extractors not to flare the gas -- or pay HUGE fines. And if it adds a small amount to the cost of fossil fuels, SO BE IT. (Not that the vast majority of people who complain about "dirty oil", etc. seem willing to actually PAY the costs associated with cleaning things up.
Which is why lawmakers don't push harder to do so.)
Given the track record of the perma-doomer blogs, I wouldn't bet a fast crash doomer's money on their predictions.
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Re: Natural gas flaring

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Thu 15 Feb 2018, 17:37:26

Outcast - It's typically not a cost factor but a lack of pipelines available to put the NG in. And the lack of a pipeline is a matter of it not being economic for a NG gathering company to build one. Thus the oil would not be produced. Same true if you put a "huge fine" on the producer which makes developing those reserves uneconomic. Thus the political hurdle: the company loses the possibility of making money but the lease owns and taxing authorities would lose revenue.
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Re: Natural gas flaring

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Mon 19 Feb 2018, 15:43:00

ROCKMAN wrote:Outcast - It's typically not a cost factor but a lack of pipelines available to put the NG in. And the lack of a pipeline is a matter of it not being economic for a NG gathering company to build one. Thus the oil would not be produced. Same true if you put a "huge fine" on the producer which makes developing those reserves uneconomic. Thus the political hurdle: the company loses the possibility of making money but the lease owns and taxing authorities would lose revenue.

Thanks for that.

And I get that. But isn't this semantics? (To me, the requirement to put in a pipeline (or some other viable solution) instead of flaring the gas is PRECISELY: a "cost factor", which would increase the total recovery cost for the oil source.)

The point I was (perhaps incorrectly in some way) trying to make is that regulations forcing such gas not to be flared would force such oil sources NOT to be used until/unless the price were high enough to make it economic AND responsibly handle the NG produced as a side effect of gathering the oil.

And if things like that routinely/consistently had to be done everywhere (globally), then the price of oil would no doubt be higher.

But we don't do that, just like we don't impose the social costs of burning fossil fuels -- because the voters don't want to pay the costs. (They want to talk about "being green", but IF the costs become at all meaningful, the polls move 180 degrees on the willingness to address AGW, pollution, etc).

Whatever the political hurdle or the current political focal point -- the key thing is we do the wrong thing, because it costs powerful entity X (be it producer or consumer or lease holder) too much.
Given the track record of the perma-doomer blogs, I wouldn't bet a fast crash doomer's money on their predictions.
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