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Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Sat 02 Jun 2018, 10:18:25
by Tuike
dohboi wrote:Yikes! Are people worried? Is that a usual thing there this time of year?


Maybe farmers are worried, but others go to beach. This is highly unusual. Normally there are three days in May, where temperature is above +25C. This years May, there were 14 days where temps were above +25C.
Source in Finnish

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Sat 02 Jun 2018, 11:19:55
by dohboi
Here in Minnesota, we just had a string of days above 90 degree F (~32C)...that never happened before here in May.

Cool again now, though, with lots of nice rain for the garden! :)

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 04 Jun 2018, 04:55:49
by vox_mundi
Bottled Water Is Selling for Nearly 50 Bucks a Case After a Panic in Oregon’s Capital City

Gov. Kate Brown called on the Oregon National Guard to tow in large, portable water holding tanks to ease the bottled water shortage in Salem.

For the past two days, Oregon's state capital has been without safe drinking water, forcing people to drive to neighboring cities to fill water canisters and purchase bottles for as much as $47 a case at gas station convenience stores.

An outside lab confirmed on Saturday that an algae bloom had added cyanotoxins—which can cause vomiting, stomach upset, diarrhea, and liver and kidney damage—to Detroit Reservoir, the city's water supply, the Statesman Journal first reported. An alert did not go out to Salem residents until Tuesday afternoon.

A confusing default notification was sent in error on Tuesday evening to a large number of Oregon cell phones.
"Civil Emergency in this area until 11:28 pm," the push notification read. "Prepare for Action."

That sparked widespread confusion—then panic. Some people began planning retreats to nuclear war bunkers, while others joked about an impending apocalypse.

Image
... There were a solid 9 minutes where I was predicting our impending “civil emergency” demise. Was the purge starting? Were aliens visiting Corvallis? Was the big earthquake coming? Was Trump planning a trip here? Oh... nope, just some nasty dirty water in Salem.



Climate Change Projected To Significantly Increase Harmful Algal Blooms In US Freshwaters

... "Some of the biggest CyanoHAB impacts will occur in more rural regions, such as those in the Southeast and Midwest - areas that don't often come up in conversation about unavoidable effects of climate change," said Steven C. Chapra, Ph.D., lead author and Louis Berger Chair of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the School of Engineering at Tufts. "The impact of climate change goes way beyond warmer air temperatures, rising sea levels and melting glaciers."

"Our study shows that higher water temperature, changes in rainfall, and increased nutrient inputs will combine to cause more frequent occurrence of harmful algal blooms in the future," he added.

It has been estimated that lakes and reservoirs serving as drinking water sources for 30 million to 48 million Americans may be contaminated periodically by algal toxins. Researchers cited an example in 2014, when nearly 500,000 residents of Toledo, Ohio, lost access to drinking water after water drawn from Lake Erie revealed the presence of cyanotoxins.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 12 Jun 2018, 08:34:17
by dohboi
Image

(Double click and pick 'view image' if you can't see the whole thing)

The SW is looking pretty dry! Is anyone from, or visiting, the four corners region to confirm how dry it is and how people are reacting to those conditions?

Of course, I always wonder in those basically desert regions, how much you even notice the difference between the usual aridity and anomalous extreme drought...

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 20 Jun 2018, 11:48:51
by Tuike
Forest fire warning has been removed for most of the country. I guess drought is over.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 26 Jun 2018, 14:17:55
by Tuike
Rain came too late. Half of crops is lost in some parts.
Link in Finnish

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 26 Jun 2018, 15:15:03
by Newfie
Interesting stuff. Google translate not good but i get the meaning.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 03 Jul 2018, 02:55:22
by M_B_S
http://www.sfweekly.com/topstories/whil ... came-back/

While Nobody Was Looking, the Drought Came Back
We can be forgiven, considering what a couple of weeks it's been — but wildfire season started early.

Peter Lawrence KaneMon Jul 2nd, 2018 10:25pm

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My name is Nobody .... :twisted:

PEAK OIL!

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 03 Jul 2018, 12:31:25
by M_B_S
WATER WARS

Snow Job: Iran Accuses Its Enemies Of 'Stealing Clouds' To Create Drought

Image

A senior Iranian official has accused Iran’s foreign enemies, including Israel, of modifying the weather in the country in order to create drought.

“Foreigners are suspected of intervening in the country’s climate," Gholamreza Jalali, the head of Iran’s Passive Defense Organization, a subdivision of the armed forces, said on July 2 in the Iranian capital, Tehran.
8O

https://www.rferl.org/a/snow-job-iran-a ... 33351.html
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Jaja we told you so :

Image

PEAK OIL!

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 04 Jul 2018, 19:01:23
by M_B_S

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Thu 05 Jul 2018, 06:09:38
by Newfie
So what do you do with it once you get it there?

https://qz.com/1321034/cape-town-day-ze ... ctica/amp/

But it won’t be cheap as towing the iceberg alone could cost up to $100 million—a steep price for an operation with several questions remaining over its viability. However, Sloane says his team will undertake all the risk if the move is approved by Cape Town. “We’ve got private investors standing by on the wings to fund it,” he tells Quartz. Under that arrangement, Sloane and his partners will only charge a delivery fee if the operation is successful. it won’t be cheap as towing the iceberg alone could cost up to $100 million—a steep price for an operation with several questions remaining over its viability. However, Sloane says his team will undertake all the risk if the move is approved by Cape Town. “We’ve got private investors standing by on the wings to fund it,” he tells Quartz. Under that arrangement, Sloane and his partners will only charge a delivery fee if the operation is successful. his team will undertake all the risk if the move is approved by Cape Town. “We’ve got private investors standing by on the wings to fund it,” he tells Quartz. Under that arrangement, Sloane and his partners will only charge a delivery fee if the operation is successful.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Thu 05 Jul 2018, 14:29:39
by onlooker
Iraq is Threatened by Catastrophic Drought


https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/07/04 ... c-drought/

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 09 Jul 2018, 20:28:51
by dohboi
More of a general water shortage than specifically just drought, but that seems to be the theme in many of these countries:

A disaster in the making, India's water crisis will be historic.

https://uk.reuters.com/article/india-wa ... KL8N1TM2XR

From the northern Himalayas to the sandy, palm-fringed beaches in the south, 600 million people - nearly half India’s population - face acute water shortage, with close to 200,000 dying each year from polluted water...

Water pollution is a major challenge, the report said, with nearly 70 percent of India’s water contaminated, impacting three in four Indians and contributing to 20 percent of the country’s disease burden.

Yet only one-third of its wastewater is currently treated, meaning raw sewage flows into rivers, lakes and ponds - and eventually gets into the groundwater.

The head of WaterAid India VK Madhavan said the country’s groundwater was now heavily contaminated.

“We are grappling with issues, with areas that have arsenic contamination, fluoride contamination, with salinity, with nitrates,” he said, listing chemicals that have been linked to cancer.

The level of chemicals in the water was so high, he said, that bacterial contamination – the source of water-borne diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera and typhoid - “is in the second order of problems”.

Crippling water problems could shave 6 percent off India’s gross domestic product, according to the report by the government think-tank, Niti Aayog.

“This 6 percent of GDP is very much dependent on water. Our industry, our food security, everything will be at stake,” said Mishra.

“It is a finite resource. It is not infinite. One day it can (become) extinct,” he said, warning that by 2030 India’s water supply will be half of the demand."

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Fri 13 Jul 2018, 14:24:37
by dohboi
Drought in Ireland reveals old “henge” monument

Ireland's heatwave reveals amazing Newgrange discovery

| IrishCentral.com

https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/hist ... -discovery

656-foot wide circle

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 16 Jul 2018, 11:30:31
by Tuike
Lantmannen forecasts the lowest harvest in twenty-five years in Sweden
Lantmännen forecasts a total of 4.2 million tonnes for the Swedish harvest in 2018, the lowest figure since 1992. Harvest per hectare is over 30 percent below the five-year average. The poor harvest is due to fewer hectares of winter wheat being sown last year and reduced yields following the extreme heat and drought in May and June.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 16 Jul 2018, 16:06:57
by Newfie
Interesting, thanks.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 18 Jul 2018, 08:38:07
by jawagord
Newfie wrote:So what do you do with it once you get it there?

https://qz.com/1321034/cape-town-day-ze ... ctica/amp/

But it won’t be cheap as towing the iceberg alone could cost up to $100 million—a steep price for an operation with several questions remaining over its viability. However, Sloane says his team will undertake all the risk if the move is approved by Cape Town. “We’ve got private investors standing by on the wings to fund it,” he tells Quartz. Under that arrangement, Sloane and his partners will only charge a delivery fee if the operation is successful. it won’t be cheap as towing the iceberg alone could cost up to $100 million—a steep price for an operation with several questions remaining over its viability. However, Sloane says his team will undertake all the risk if the move is approved by Cape Town. “We’ve got private investors standing by on the wings to fund it,” he tells Quartz. Under that arrangement, Sloane and his partners will only charge a delivery fee if the operation is successful. his team will undertake all the risk if the move is approved by Cape Town. “We’ve got private investors standing by on the wings to fund it,” he tells Quartz. Under that arrangement, Sloane and his partners will only charge a delivery fee if the operation is successful.


OR the city can cut back on it's water use and wait for the rainy season to refill the reservoirs, crisis averted!

http://www.capetown.gov.za/Family%20and ... dam-levels

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 18 Jul 2018, 09:30:24
by dohboi
The Flash Drought Brought Misery, but Did It Change Minds on Climate Change?

Ranchers in Divide County, North Dakota, rely on the rain. Last year the rains failed, and the temperature shot up. ‘The crops just didn’t come out of the ground.’


Drought is an especially wily adversary. As an officer of the North Dakota Department of Emergency Services told me recently, "You can't put up a sandbag wall to stop a drought."

In Divide County, agricultural producers are especially vulnerable to the effects of drought, since they depend on dryland methods. Dryland farmers use no irrigation. Instead, they rely wholly on rain: to initiate the lush growth of little bluestem and other pastureland grasses that will sustain their herds through the summer, and to secure the hay harvest that will get the herd through the winter. Not to mention the rain they need for their wheat, barley and pea cash crops.

In 2017, ranchers were optimistic when they put their cattle out to graze in late spring. There'd been record snowfall over the winter, and regional forecasts weren't calling for any drought conditions in their northwest region of the Great Plains. By May, though, concerns were rising. Rain failed to come, and the good winter moisture evaporated into a cloudless sky. By July, two-thirds of the pastureland in the Dakotas was in poor condition, and across the High Plains, from Kansas up to Canada, temperatures were above normal while precipitation was low—perfect conditions for what's known as a "flash drought," sudden and severe.

By the first of August, the USDA reported that nearly three-quarters of North Dakota's topsoil was desperately bereft of moisture. Part of Divide County was at the most severe drought level, and 60 percent of the state was facing some level of drought. It was the state's fourth-driest summer since record-keeping started in 1895. Ranchers hauled water to their herds and vied for hay donations that flowed in from other regions after the state opened a hay lottery. Anything to supplement the feed of the hungry cattle.

What happened? How had it happened so fast? And would it happen again? ...


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/1707 ... ate-change

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Sat 21 Jul 2018, 08:59:04
by dohboi
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... ips-europe

Crop failure and bankruptcy threaten farmers as drought grips Europe


Abnormally hot temperatures continue to wreak devastation across northern and central parts of the continent

Farmers across northern and central Europe are facing crop failure and bankruptcy as one of the most intense regional droughts in recent memory strengthens its grip.

States of emergency have been declared in Latvia and Lithuania, while the sun continues to bake Swedish fields that have received only 12% of their normal rainfall.

The abnormally hot temperatures – which have topped 30C in the Arctic Circle – are in line with climate change trends, according to the World Meteorological Organization. And as about 50 wildfires rage across Sweden, no respite from the heatwave is yet in sight.

Lennart Nilsson, a 55-year-old cattle farmer from Falkenberg near Malmo and co-chair of the Swedish Farmers Association, said it was the worst drought he had experienced.

“This is really serious,” he said. “Most of south-west Sweden hasn’t had rain since the first days of May. A very early harvest has started but yields seem to be the lowest for 25 years – 50% lower, or more in some cases – and it is causing severe losses.”

If no rain comes soon, Nilsson’s association estimates agricultural losses of up to 8bn Swedish kronor (£700m) this year and widespread bankruptcies. The drought would personally cost him around 500,000 kronor (£43,000), Nilsson said, adding that, like most farmers, he is now operating at a loss.

The picture is little different in the Netherlands, where Iris Bouwers, a 25-year-old farmer, said the parched summer had been a “catastrophe” for her farm.

“Older families around me are comparing this to 1976,” she said. “My dad can’t remember any drought like this.” The Bouwerses expect to lose €100,000 this year after a 30% drop in their potato crop. After investing in a pig stable over the winter, the family have no savings to cover the loss.

Asked what she would do, Bouwers just laughed. “Hope and pray,” she said. “There is not much more I can do. I wouldn’t talk about bankruptcy yet, but our deficit will be substantial. It probably means we need to have a very good talk with the bank.”

If anything, the situation is even worse in Poland, Belarus and the Czech Republic, where vegetation stress has taken hold. In parts of Germany, some farmers are reportedly destroying arid crops.

After June was declared the second warmest on record, the European commission pledged to help farmers with a raft of measures, including the temporary suspension of “greening” obligations partly intended to prevent climate change.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Sun 22 Jul 2018, 11:29:51
by M_B_S
http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/programs/ ... ht/9959434

The natural disaster nobody's talking about
MONDAY 9 JULY 2018 5:02PM

In New South Wales, 99 per cent of the state is currently affected by drought, and there's no clear end to it in sight....
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Yeah still on the whatch for MAD MAX GW

PEAK OIL!