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Re: Heat Waves 2019

Unread postPosted: Fri 26 Jul 2019, 14:54:19
by Azothius
from that article that MBS links above^

As Paris experienced its hottest day ever, reaching 42,6 degrees, a new heat record was set in a village in the south of the country, Verargues, where the mercury hit 46 degrees, smashing the previous record of 44,1 degrees.


42.6c = 108.68?

46c = 114.8???

Re: Heat Waves 2019

Unread postPosted: Sat 27 Jul 2019, 18:50:56
by Plantagenet
British women have come up with an interesting and inexpensive way to the fight the heat and stay cool during the recent heat wave.

british-doctors-forced-tell-women-not-put-ice-lollies-their-vaginas-cool-down]

However, doctors say it isn't medically recommended.

Cheers!

Re: Heat Waves 2019

Unread postPosted: Tue 30 Jul 2019, 07:04:53
by dohboi
The world’s climate emergency is getting harder to ignore


We’re still coming to grips with how hot the recent heat wave that scorched through Europe actually was.

What happened? An intense area of high pressure, known as a “heat dome,” settled over Western Europe. As The Washington Post’s deputy weather editor Andrew Freedman explained, the stunning margins by which many of the previous record highs were eclipsed over the last week point to an inescapable reality: man-made climate change.

“The weather system responsible for the heat wave is now parked on top of Greenland, where it is expected to significantly speed up the pace and extent of ice melt for the next week. It could also help to drive Arctic sea ice to a record low by September, beating a record set in 2012.”

Conditions are all the more terrifying elsewhere.

• Epic heat waves racked South Asia and the Middle East earlier this summer;

•glaciers in the Himalayas are now melting at double the rate since the turn of the century.

•Last month, the World Meteorological Organization projected that the period between the beginning of 2015 and the end of this year will mark the Earth’s five warmest years on record.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/20 ... rld&wpmm=1

Re: Heat Waves 2019

Unread postPosted: Fri 02 Aug 2019, 09:23:03
by Azothius
At least 11 people have died across Japan in an unexpected heat wave


https://www.yahoo.com/news/least-11-peo ... 06401.html

Temperatures in Japan unexpectedly rose after the end of a rainy season this summer, with highs of about 37 degrees Celsius (98.6 degrees Fahrenheit) expected this week.

Re: Heat Waves 2019

Unread postPosted: Sun 11 Aug 2019, 04:46:48
by dohboi
A large area of OK just surpassed 90 F wet bulb temp:

Dangerous heat ...
https://twitter.com/spiltz/status/1160282608435105795

Vanilla ice ice baby

Unread postPosted: Sun 11 Aug 2019, 08:11:28
by Whitefang
Plantagenet wrote:British women have come up with an interesting and inexpensive way to the fight the heat and stay cool during the recent heat wave.

british-doctors-forced-tell-women-not-put-ice-lollies-their-vaginas-cool-down]

However, doctors say it isn't medically recommended.

Cheers!


It does take a certain kind of person to immediately take notice of these vaginal affairs :roll:
Alike Plant I am surely one of them :-D
Amazing developments indeed.

Re: Heat Waves 2019

Unread postPosted: Mon 12 Aug 2019, 19:01:53
by dohboi
Dangerous Heat Grips Wide Stretch of the South and Midwest

https://phys.org/news/2019-08-dangerous ... dwest.html

Forecasters are warning of scorching heat across a wide stretch of the U.S. South and Midwest, where the heat index will feel as high as 117 degrees (47 Celsius) in some spots.

Parts of 13 states on Monday will be under heat advisories, from Texas, Louisiana and Florida in the South to Missouri and Illinois in the Midwest, the National Weather Service reported.

Some of the most oppressive conditions Monday were being felt in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi and Oklahoma, forecasters said.

It was expected to feel like 116 degrees (46.7 Celsius) in parts of eastern Oklahoma, near Tulsa, on Monday, forecasters said. And parts of Arkansas just west of Memphis, Tennessee, could see heat indexes Monday of around 117 degrees (47.2 Celsius).

... "It feels like hell is what it feels like," said Junae Brooks, who runs Junae's Grocery in Holly Bluff, Mississippi.

In the Mississippi Delta region, farmers did not have a choice but to work in the fields Monday since they're scrambling to make repairs and get caught up after floodwaters inundated the region in recent months. The flooding—which involved an area larger than New York City and Los Angeles combined—has recently receded and the farmers are just now able to reach their land and begin cleaning up the mess left behind.

"The mosquitoes the gnats, the spiders, the snakes—all of them—have been way worse this year," Brooks said of the land known locally as the Yazoo backwater area.

The region hardest-hit by this week's heat wave could experience many more days each year when the heat index soars as the effects of climate change increase, scientists say.