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Out of Africa........

Unread postPosted: Sun 03 Sep 2017, 13:06:07
by Whitefang
On a personal note, we had a bit of water rationing on the Rif, Chefchaouen that is. Morning water closure of 2 hours between 10 and 12.
Harvest of around 1800 kg, all by hand except the milling, done by dieselmachine at a local station where I had my mom's car fixed, blew two tires for driving dirt/4wd and hit the underbelly of her Ford C to the max.
I took two bags back to Holland, enough to bake our own bread for a while.
A full week to travel for having financial challenges, filling up does require handy euro's. Fortunately I had my family tent and survival gear ready.
Borderpolice at Tanger Med. asked me for having any weapons in my fully loaded car, happy that they did no search.......

Summer harvest were ok on the rif, even with that extra heat, maybe they are using heat adapted grains?

Why water will become the world’s most important asset

Unread postPosted: Thu 21 Dec 2017, 13:39:15
by AdamB

“Water will eventually become the single most important physical commodity-based asset class, dwarfing oil, copper, agricultural commodities and precious metals”. That was economist and ex-Bank of England MPC member Willem Buiter more than six years ago. You could say he was a bit early in his forecast. While water is vital for life, it hasn’t so far become the planet’s most-wanted asset. But as I examine today, this could be only a matter of time… Tewkesbury’s taps turn off Let’s start at home. The UK receives less rainfall per person than our northern European neighbours. The South East of England is the most water-stressed part of the country, with London actually drier than Istanbul (believe it or not!) Meanwhile, our national demand for water is high and rising. Every Brit uses about 150 litres of water a day, up 1% each year since 1930, according


Why water will become the world’s most important asset

Re: Why water will become the world’s most important asset

Unread postPosted: Thu 21 Dec 2017, 13:40:40
by AdamB
Ironic this article comes from someone writing it on an island. And without any idea on how easy it is to convert contaminated water (say...salt water... :lol: ) and converting it to something else...say...fresh water.

Re: Why water will become the world’s most important asset

Unread postPosted: Thu 21 Dec 2017, 14:16:35
by pstarr
You understand that desalinization requires energy, and you also know that energy is not free per se. And that money is energy as is all transfer of value and wealth. So desalinization must be created . . . at a cost in energy.

Re: Why water will become the world’s most important asset

Unread postPosted: Thu 21 Dec 2017, 22:58:16
by Subjectivist
I live on a river feeding into the fifth largest natural body of fresh water in North America for a reason.

Re: Why water will become the world’s most important asset

Unread postPosted: Fri 22 Dec 2017, 07:08:08
by dolanbaker
AdamB wrote:Ironic this article comes from someone writing it on an island. And without any idea on how easy it is to convert contaminated water (say...salt water... :lol: ) and converting it to something else...say...fresh water.

It is a rather large island, the central parts are at most 110km from the nearest coast, It's a long way to transport the desalinated sea water. Anyway, in the UK, the biggest issue with water is leakage, in some regions, less than half the water that leaves the water treatment plants reaches the end user's tap.

Re: Why water will become the world’s most important asset

Unread postPosted: Fri 22 Dec 2017, 19:08:12
by Shaved Monkey
Ive got 4 large rainwater tanks(over flowing at the moment) directly plumbed to my house, with the option of town water just a turn of the tap away.
That is fed by a natural aquifer, topped up by rain water and a de sal plant running 24/7 down the road.

Turn to the left for tank turn to right for town.
Its on tank 99% of the time including watering all my fruit trees and veggie garden
1 more medium sized tank it goes to 100%

Re: Why water will become the world’s most important asset

Unread postPosted: Fri 22 Dec 2017, 19:18:00
by Shaved Monkey
It takes a lot of power to move water on a state level if your lucky enough to have it to move.

South Australian government is going to make its water system 100% renewable by 2020
One of South Australia's biggest electricity users has set itself an ambitious goal to eliminate its $55 million annual energy bill by 2020.

SA Water will boost its generation of renewable energy and add storage capacity to help achieve its goal of achieving "zero net electricity costs" within the next three years.

An initial $10 million investment will go on up to 6 megawatts of solar photovoltaic panels to be installed across some of SA Water's large metropolitan sites, with the first to be set up in the first half of 2018.
It is also installing a $500,000 pilot project, involving a 100 kilowatt solar PV and a 50 kW battery storage system,

Other pilot projects involve floating solar PV arrays on reservoirs, silicon thermal storage to complement biogas generation, and mechanical battery storage systems using flywheels.

The thermal storage project involves Adelaide-based 1414 Degrees and will involve storing latent heat in molten silicon to form a 1.5 megawatt-hour battery which can release about 250 kW of power for six hours.
SA Water had already been trimming its electricity costs by more than $3 million a year since 2013.
http://www.afr.com/business/energy/elec ... 222-h0950j

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 04:31:18
by Tuike
Cape Town could become first major city in world to run out of water after 90-day warning -independent
Cape Town may become the first large city in the world to run out of water, as officials warn there are fewer than 90 days left before the supply runs dry. The city’s mayor Patricia De Lille said residents had until 22 April until “day zero”, when authorities have estimated the water supply will be finished if residents do not scale back their usage.

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 07:38:35
by onlooker
Tuike wrote:Cape Town could become first major city in world to run out of water after 90-day warning -independent
Cape Town may become the first large city in the world to run out of water, as officials warn there are fewer than 90 days left before the supply runs dry. The city’s mayor Patricia De Lille said residents had until 22 April until “day zero”, when authorities have estimated the water supply will be finished if residents do not scale back their usage.

Maybe somebody should get up and running a Peak Water site. We can live without oil but not water

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 09:05:12
by Newfie
That’s true Onlooker. But if you look around you will see we are facing many “peaks”, on different time scales, but each significant and worriesome.

Although the site is labeled “Peak OIL” I personally see it as a place to discuss “Resource Depletion@ in general, with PO being the entry point.

It may bear some consideration to add some topics to our forum index or even just one labeled “Other Resource Depletion Discussions”.

I see this as an incomplete list:
Fossil Fuel
Water
Pollution Sinks
Arable Soul
Fish

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 09:17:43
by GHung
Newfie wrote:That’s true Onlooker. But if you look around you will see we are facing many “peaks”, on different time scales, but each significant and worriesome.

Although the site is labeled “Peak OIL” I personally see it as a place to discuss “Resource Depletion@ in general, with PO being the entry point.

It may bear some consideration to add some topics to our forum index or even just one labeled “Other Resource Depletion Discussions”.

I see this as an incomplete list:
Fossil Fuel
Water
Pollution Sinks
Arable Soul
Fish


I've always been a peak everything guy. I'll stick with the LTG graph, generally. I see just about every resource will peak within a 20-30 year period; peak industry, peak agriculture, and peak civilization will coincide. Peak population will follow.

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 11:27:01
by onlooker
true guys. That is why you will find my posts on the Oil threads sometimes alluding to the full extent of our overshoot dilemna. As the LTG expertly tried to model. All the constraints are quite interconnected. The entire forest and all that

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 11:36:18
by GHung
onlooker wrote:true guys. That is why you will find my posts on the Oil sites sometimes alluding to the full extent of our overshoot dilemna. As the LTG expertly tried to model. All the constraints are quite interconnected. The entire forest and all that



For those interested in reading the original LTG:
http://www.donellameadows.org/wp-conten ... ersion.pdf

30 year update:
https://www.slideshare.net/VRyzhonkov/l ... ars-update

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 11:50:43
by Plantagenet
GHung wrote:For those interested in reading the original LTG:
http://www.donellameadows.org/wp-conten ... ersion.pdf

30 year update:
https://www.slideshare.net/VRyzhonkov/l ... ars-update


A 40 year update and review of the original WORLD3 computer model used in LTG is discussed here

Cheers!

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 18:14:22
by GHung
Save the Snowpack, Save the Water Supply

Between droughts and floods, the last decade has offered water managers in the southwest a preview of how climate change could impact a supply largely dependent on winter snow. This year’s disappointing snowpack has them worried again.

"Water and climate change are joined at the hip,” said Brad Udall, a researcher at Colorado State University who published a paper earlier this year showing how climate change has reduced flows in the Colorado River. “One of the primary impacts of a warming atmosphere are changes to our water cycle."

Snowpack is 50 percent lower than the average at this point in the winter at dozens of basins in the region. It’s a major concern in a region with a growing population where water supplies are often pushed to their limits, even in good years. In addition to fueling the West's winter tourism industry, the snow provides a steady supply of water for the Colorado River, which serves 40 million people spread from Denver to Los Angeles. ......

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... ter-supply


I'm pretty sure that Brad Udall is the late Randy Udall's younger brother. Randy was an ASPO co-founder and used to post over at TOD occasionally; died hiking in Wyoming a few years ago.

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Fri 19 Jan 2018, 20:13:46
by Newfie
Looks like Cape Town May be in trouble

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/wor ... 047237001/

Water, water everywhere – but for how much longer?

Unread postPosted: Mon 19 Mar 2018, 21:30:19
by AdamB

Demand for water is expected to increase by nearly one-third by 2050 as the planet's population expands, according to the 2018 World Water Development Report from the United Nations. To provide enough water for drinking, growing crops, generating power and other uses, governments and businesses should work more closely with nature, which controls the water cycle, the report said. Incorporating more green space into cities, conserving wetlands, and farming in ways that keep the soil healthy are examples of the "nature-based solutions" backed by the report. These can also help protect people from floods, drought and other water-linked threats, it said. Here are some facts on water use, and the risks of too much or too little water. * Global water use has increased by a factor of six over the past 100 years, and is growing steadily at a rate of about 1 per


Water, water everywhere – but for how much longer?

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Mon 11 Jun 2018, 05:41:33
by M_B_S
http://www.thejournal.ie/indian-water-c ... 2-Jun2018/

'There are fights and even injuries': Indian water crisis causes daily desperation
There are tense scenes on a daily basis as temperatures soar and India experiences water shortages.
Sun 3:31 AM (06102018)

WHEN THE WATER truck finally arrived into the Delhi slum, there was a stampede.

It is a scene repeated daily across India as temperatures rise and the vital resource gets ever scarcer.
************************
THIS IS GW MAD MAX

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d605rM0U3x0


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Mad Max: Fury Road - Let There Be Water :!: :idea:

Re: Peak Water Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Sun 17 Jun 2018, 21:27:38
by vox_mundi
India Faces 'Worst-Ever' Water Crisis: Report

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About 600 million Indians are facing high to extreme stress over water, according to the Composite Water Resources Management report by the government's policy think-tank Niti Aayog this week.

The comprehensive study on the state of India's water warned of conflict and other related threats, including food security risks, unless actions are taken to restore water bodies.

Many parched cities and villages in India are pushing back their "Day Zero" (when water taps run dry), but barely, warned the new report.

About 40 percent of the population will have no access to clean drinking water by 2030.

More than 20 cities, including New Delhi, Bengaluru and Chennai, will run out of groundwater by 2020, affecting 100 million people, according to the report.

Agricultural baskets, states that are home to 50 percent of the population, are the low performers in the government policy body's Water Index, that could pose a "significant food security risk" for India.
"What this report says was true 15 years ago, now the situation has worsened. Ninety cities in India do not have enough clean drinking water now to sustain its populace,"

Depleting groundwater reserves, paired with climatic changes such as rising temperatures, could further exacerbate water scarcity, experts have warned.

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