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US oil production watch thread Pt. 2

A forum for discussion of regional topics including oil depletion but also government, society, and the future.

Re: Saudi Aramco IPO

Unread postby kublikhan » Thu 18 Oct 2018, 15:53:26

shortonoil wrote:Of course it can, as long as it keeps importing 8 million barrels a day like it is now doing. Come on pstarr, get with the program here. Just because we import 43% of our oil doesn't mean we need it?
Actually it doesn't. Because we rexport most of that as gasoline and other refined fuels. Our net oil imports are the lowest they've been in 50 years. We are currently importing 2.3 million net barrels per day.

U.S. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)

BTW, pay off your lost bets welcher.
The oil barrel is half-full.
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Re: Saudi Aramco IPO

Unread postby rockdoc123 » Thu 18 Oct 2018, 16:29:06

The US has lots of oil!! It's called NGLs, road tar, horse piss, and camel pee. And, it is all specially formulated, and ready to be shipped to China. We are so rich in energy that Congress is going to enlist another Energizer Bunny!


What a twit. It’s bad enough that you show back up here after pontificating for several years about the ETP model which would have oil at about $40 now and how nobody can afford oil anymore without so much as a “oops…guess I’m an idiot” apology. Now you want to add to the “dumb things shortonoil has said” list? It is a very long list.

Proven Crude Reserves and Production in the US are as high as they have ever been.

Image

US crude oil and products exports are now at 7554 bbls/d or 8 times what they were in 2006. The US still imports oil because it needs certain characteristics to blend with it's own oil to meet refinery specs. It exports light oil to countries that have distillate refineries that can process that crude directly.
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Re: US oil production watch thread Pt. 2

Unread postby Tanada » Tue 11 Dec 2018, 15:09:24

The interactive chart at the link lets you look behind the curtain by isolating factors to your hearts content. You can look at a single basin, a single state, even a single company or county. You can display the data by years, months, or other factors as well.
PAGE

This interactive presentation contains the latest oil & gas production data from 96,273 horizontal wells in 10 US states, through August. Cumulative oil and gas production from these wells reached 9.5 Gbo and 104 Tcf. Ohio and West Virginia are deselected in most dashboards, as they have a greater reporting lag.

Oil production from horizontal wells in these states grew by almost 2 million bo/d in the 2 years through August. This growth rate was similar as in the boom years of 2013-14. The Permian was responsible for most of this gain, which you’ll see if you show the production data by ‘Basin’ (using the ‘Show production by’ selection).

Natural gas production has been setting new records as well during those 2 years and was above 47 Bcf/d in the basins we cover.

The steady increases in well productivity are shown in the ‘Well status’ tab, where all the oily basins are preselected. The horizontal wells that started in 2018 are so far closely tracking the performance of the ones from 2017.

In the final tab you will find the production histories and location of the largest shale operators. We’ve made a change in this dashboard; now the operators are ranked by their total production in the past 12 months (and not by their total historical production). This makes especially a big difference in the Permian, where several operators have recently increased production at a rapid rate.
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Re: US oil production watch thread Pt. 2

Unread postby Pops » Fri 14 Dec 2018, 10:56:26

Very cool, but info overload fer sure!
The legitimate object of government, is to do for a community of people, whatever they need to have done, but can not do, at all, or can not, so well do, for themselves -- in their separate, and individual capacities.
-- Abraham Lincoln, Fragment on Government (July 1, 1854)
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Re: US oil production watch thread Pt. 2

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Sat 15 Dec 2018, 12:36:17

k - "Just because we import 43% of our oil doesn't mean we need it?"..."Actually it doesn't." Actually whether "we" need it or not depends upon which "we" you're representing. If that "we" represents 100's of thousands of highly paid refinery workers they certainly need it. I live in Baytown, Texas, one of the country's refining mega-centers. Many $billions have been spent expanding our refinery capacity. The shareholders of those refineries certainly need to oil imports in order to maintain stock value. The potential new refinery employees need that oil: thousands are currently in local training centers preparing for a major boost in their living standards. Local home builders are doing great also along with current homeowners (like the Rockman) are very pleased to see real estate prices booming. Many US cities are seeing those trends moving in the opposite direction. The govt bean counters are certainly happy to see at least one US industry with expanding exports that are helping to reduce our trade deficit.

There are a lot of "we's" that are very dependent upon those imports. And that includes every US consumer of gasoline et al: if our refineries were not the world's leading exporter of the products that market would be much tighter and US consumers would be spending 10's of $BILLIONS more every year. Folks really need to take a breath, step back and look at the BIG PICTURE and not just small snapshots.
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Re: US oil production watch thread Pt. 2

Unread postby copious.abundance » Thu 07 Mar 2019, 22:59:45

Presented without further comment.

Image
linky
Stuff for doomers to contemplate:
http://peakoil.com/forums/post1190117.html#p1190117
http://peakoil.com/forums/post1193930.html#p1193930
http://peakoil.com/forums/post1206767.html#p1206767
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Re: US oil production watch thread Pt. 2

Unread postby Revi » Thu 04 Apr 2019, 10:20:07

We are producing a lot. Let's hope it saves us!
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Re: US oil production watch thread Pt. 2

Unread postby GoghGoner » Fri 19 Apr 2019, 08:24:39

In this week's rig count, we are dead even yoy: +5 for oil-directed and -5 for gas-directed. This is a great indicator that the exponential look of that graph is going to radically change over the next few months.

WTI over $60 and a falling rig count -> has a new day dawned and investment dried up? Time will tell.
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Re: US oil production watch thread Pt. 2

Unread postby dissident » Fri 19 Apr 2019, 15:51:18

GoghGoner wrote:In this week's rig count, we are dead even yoy: +5 for oil-directed and -5 for gas-directed. This is a great indicator that the exponential look of that graph is going to radically change over the next few months.

WTI over $60 and a falling rig count -> has a new day dawned and investment dried up? Time will tell.


Tight oil was never going to approach the conventional reserves in size. The time axis on these graphs needs to be expanded to the last 70 years. The current spike is a short lived transient.

Of course, thanks to MSM incompetence or shilling we have the "shale oil" and "shale-like conventional oil" (e.g. Bakken) and "shale kerogens" (e.g. Green River) all mixed up in the minds of politicians and average media consumers. So there is the absurd expectation that kerogen deposit estimates somehow represent tight oil reserves.
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