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THE Mexico Thread Pt. 2 (merged)

A forum for discussion of regional topics including oil depletion but also government, society, and the future.

Mexico orders release of jailed US marine

Unread postby dolanbaker » Fri 31 Oct 2014, 20:59:09

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-29858652
A US marine imprisoned in Mexico for driving a vehicle loaded with firearms across the border has been released.

The family of retired Marine Sgt Andrew Tahmooressi expressed their "overwhelming and humbling feeling of relief" in a statement.

A judge in Tijuana ordered his immediate release on Friday, eight months after he was jailed.

The 26-year-old from Florida had said he got lost on a California motorway and accidentally crossed the border.


How the Fúck did he "accidentally cross the border!
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Re: Mexico orders release of jailed US marine

Unread postby Tanada » Fri 31 Oct 2014, 21:19:36

dolanbaker wrote:
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-29858652
A US marine imprisoned in Mexico for driving a vehicle loaded with firearms across the border has been released.

The family of retired Marine Sgt Andrew Tahmooressi expressed their "overwhelming and humbling feeling of relief" in a statement.

A judge in Tijuana ordered his immediate release on Friday, eight months after he was jailed.

The 26-year-old from Florida had said he got lost on a California motorway and accidentally crossed the border.


How the Fúck did he "accidentally cross the border!
Image



Most of the Mexican/American border is open desert. The fenced sections are mostly in high traffic area's with cities on each side of the border.
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Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby vox_mundi » Wed 26 Nov 2014, 10:18:45

The end of Mexican democracy
http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2 ... cracy.html
... Before taking office Dec. 1, 2012, Peña Nieto penned an op-ed for The Washington Post in which he tried to assuage concerns about his intimate connections with the most corrupt and backward old guard of the authoritarian Institutional Revolutionary Party, which ruled the country from 1929 until 2000. He encouraged observers to forget about the party’s past and instead look at its “plan to open Mexico’s energy sector to national and foreign private investment.”

Writing on the eve of his first meeting with President Barack Obama in Washington, Peña Nieto claimed that such reforms would “contribute to guaranteeing North American energy independence,” since “Mexico holds the fifth-largest shale gas reserve in the world, in addition to large deep-water oil reserves and a tremendous potential in renewable energy.”

Obama, the U.S. military and Congress eagerly accepted Peña Nieto’s Faustian bargain. They would blindly support his presidency in exchange for quick action on energy reform.

Over the last two years, both sides have loyally held up their ends of the deal. In December 2013, Peña Nieto pushed through historic reforms to Article 27 of the constitution that broke up the state monopoly over the oil industry and opened the floodgates to speculation and vast private investment by international oil giants. The majority of Mexicans adamantly rejected these reforms, but they were steamrolled through the National Congress and passed by a majority of the state legislatures in only 10 days without debate and in flagrant violation of the democratic process.

Such quick legal action authorizing the transfer of public oil rents to private hands fulfilled the wildest dreams of Washington. The U.S. has pushed for years without avail to achieve similar reforms in occupied Iraq without success. But in Mexico a loyal and corrupt president proved to be much more effective than direct military occupation.

Unsurprisingly, most of the international press vigorously applauded the oil reform. “As Venezuela’s economy implodes and Brazil’s growth stalls, Mexico is becoming the Latin oil producer to watch — and a model of how democracy can serve a developing country,” wrote the editorial board of The Washington Post. The Financial Times excitedly proclaimed that “Mexico’s historic vote to open its oil and gas sector to private investment after 75 years yoked to the state is a political coup for Enrique Peña Nieto.” And Forbes magazine argued that although previous President Felipe Calderón “may have pushed for real oil reforms, it’s Peña Nieto who will get the spot in the history books.”

Since Peña Nieto took power, the U.S. government has not issued a single condemnation of corruption or human rights violations in Mexico. This in a context in which leading international organizations such as Human Rights Watch, Article 19 and dozens of local NGOs have documented a scandalous increase in the repression of protest and violence against the press during the present administration.

The muted response by the U.S. government to the Sept. 26 student massacre is part of a broader trend of looking the other away.

But the U.S. government has not just stood by the sidelines. It has also ramped up its direct involvement with the drug war in Mexico. Congress has appropriated billions of dollars to fund the Mexican government security apparatuses in recent years. Mexican and U.S. authorities have set up elite fusion centers throughout the country for sharing intelligence information. And The Wall Street Journal just revealed that U.S. agents dress up in the uniforms of Mexican military personnel to participate directly in special missions, such as the recent arrest of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, the powerful leader of the Sinaloa cartel.
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby Subjectivist » Wed 26 Nov 2014, 10:36:03

Mexico has been an independent country from the 1860's on, but has yet to have a stable democratic government that accomplishes real reforms.
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Wed 26 Nov 2014, 11:37:25

“Such quick legal action…fulfilled the wildest dreams of Washington.” I wonder if they’ll turn into wet dreams should the Chinese become the primary beneficiary of the changes in Mexico. The Mexican govt has already begun a very small pilot program exporting oil to China. In addition China has held talks with the govt over building out the Mexican refining capacity: currently Mexico spend 25% of its oil export revenue buying imported refined products…mostly from the US. Similar to the refinery JV with the Saudis I suspect any such investments in Mexico will guarantee access to their oil by the Chinese. And lastly, going on the nasty supposition that corruption in the Mexican govt isn’t going to disappear: US law prohibits American companies from bribing foreign govt officials. China, OTOH, actually funds such efforts.
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby rockdoc123 » Wed 26 Nov 2014, 12:08:58

And lastly, going on the nasty supposition that corruption in the Mexican govt isn’t going to disappear: US law prohibits American companies from bribing foreign govt officials.


the new changes to oil and gas regulations will help avoid this. Now any of the upcoming bid rounds whether they be offshore exploration or onshore mature fields will be tendered through a consistent process. The terms haven't been announced as yet but the government consulted with a number of other countries in order to arrive as something that is fair and tamper proof. The end result would be public bids that aren't questionable...i.e. the bidding criteria is made public and the criteria to win or lose is not complex so the results are hard to fix.

This has worked elsewhere ( Colombia as an example) and eliminates much of the behind scenes deal making that makes corruption easy.

MX is now organized much like Colombia. They have the Ministry (SENER) and below that the body that regulates the oil and gas industry (CNH). Pemex is now a semi-private corporation in essence, they no longer can make the final decision on who they partner with, CNH having some say in that.
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby Quinny » Wed 26 Nov 2014, 15:34:16

Reads like a new chapter of "Confessions of an Economic Hit-Man". US imperialism is alive and kicking!
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Wed 26 Nov 2014, 20:39:21

Well, I'm very happy for the Mexican people to hear that political corruption is no longer a significant issue in their country.
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby SILENTTODD » Wed 26 Nov 2014, 22:41:11

Mexico is a Democracy?

And here all these years I thought it was a simple Kleptocracy.
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby GoghGoner » Thu 27 Nov 2014, 12:09:22

Mexico oil exports are now at 1981 levels and still regressing. Not too much easy stuff left there and a lot of money for IOCs to lose in the current environment.
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby rockdoc123 » Thu 27 Nov 2014, 23:26:00

In terms of "easy stuff" you have to think in terms of Mexico as being a country who has been operating at a technological level a few decades behind the rest of North America. People will say....well Schlumberger and Halliburton were in there recently but the point most folks don't get is service companies like Big Blue and Big Red don't give two hoots about improving production in Mexico, they are only interested in getting service fees.....something which was painfully apparent to the Mexican gov't after the last couple of service agreement bid rounds.
The fields in Mexico are largely underdeveloped simply because Pemex did not interest itself in that aspect of the business, they were interested in exploring and initial development and it is hard to argue they were not exceptional at that. However, they have always done a poorer job at reservoir management and field optimization. That is where the low hanging fruit will be. Unfortunately I suspect the gov't will make the terms so egregious with respect to field redevelopment that no one reputable will take it on.
My view is there is a lot of unswept oil onshore.
This of course ignores the fact the EagleFord trend from TX wanders across the border into northern MX. No reason to assume that if you can chase Eagleford in TX at the current price that it's counterpart across the border shouldn't be much different.
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Mexican govt: "no wall, north america is integrated"

Unread postby Sixstrings » Thu 03 Mar 2016, 10:34:32

In a televised interview late on Wednesday, Finance Minister Luis Videgaray categorically rejected the proposal.

"Under no circumstance will Mexico pay for the wall that Mr. Trump is proposing," he said. "Building a wall between Mexico and the United States is a terrible idea. It is an idea based on ignorance and has no foundation in the reality of North American integration."
https://ca.news.yahoo.com/mexico-says-wont-pay-trumps-terrible-border-wall-145016621.html


Trump should clarify this wall stuff and specify that it's a tariff that would pay for the wall, not literally Mexico writing a check.

But having said that, I don't really like the talk about "north america is integrated," what the heck is that about.

We're two separate countries. Mexico saying that "North America is integrated" makes it sound like "North America" is a country.

Am I missing something here? When did we vote on a european union with Mexico?

I guess that's obviously the truth of what these trade agreements are. It's just startling to hear it framed that way, that's how Mexico sees it, like we're all in a european union together.
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Re: Mexican govt: "no wall, north america is integrated"

Unread postby Tanada » Thu 03 Mar 2016, 10:45:55

It was called NAFTA, created by the globalist Clinton Administration.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
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Re: Mexican govt: "no wall, north america is integrated"

Unread postby yellowcanoe » Thu 03 Mar 2016, 11:34:50

It would be impossible to build a wall over the entire distance of the US Mexican border that would keep everyone out. Even the much smaller Berlin wall that included guards who would shoot anyone seen trying to escape from East Berlin was not completely successful in stopping the flow of people from East Germany into Berlin. The effort needs to go into returning illegal aliens and stopping companies from employing them. I'm baffled though at how many Americans think it is good to have millions of illegal aliens residing in the US.

Us Canadians are lucky to not share a border with Mexico. We did have a problem with large numbers of Mexican's flying to Canada and asking for asylum. That problem was mostly fixed after we required Mexicans to have a visa before coming to Canada. However, our new Federal government has indicated it wants to remove the visa requirement.
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Mexico's Pemex faces losses

Unread postby batistasatoshi » Tue 05 Apr 2016, 19:55:10

Has any of you heard about Mexico's main oil company, Pemex, facing declining international oil prices, company losses and high debt?
What do you think should Pemex do? Should they close it down and sell the company and its assets to a foreign company or do you think it can recover from its debt?
If you want to read a little more about this, you can go here: http://www.forbes.com/sites/doliaestevez/2016/02/09/new-ceo-of-mexicos-pemex-to-reorganize-oil-company-amidst-falling-prices-rising-losses/#80b18ae723b6
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby Subjectivist » Sun 30 Oct 2016, 20:45:29

As I recall Mexico was suppossed to be a net importer right around now, but I can't find current figures to tell if they are still exporting or net importers.
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Re: Mexico's Oil - At What Price?

Unread postby Tanada » Mon 31 Oct 2016, 11:17:20

pstarr wrote:hows this?
Image


So it kind of looks like Mexico net exports have fallen under 1 MM/bbl/d, but while I appreciate the graph it is hard to be certain the interpretation is correct. Where did you find that one, when I searched earlier the only one I could find were 2014 and 2012.

After the question got posted I searched around and saw a lot of contradictory information. Some writers include Propane in Mexico oil imports, some throw in Natural Gas imports in BOE, which to me is not proper. I can see the point of counting Propane in that for a lot of machines like Fork Lifts and LPG delivery trucks it is used as the fuel supply. Mexico does not have as much need for Propane space heating as the USA but it does use some for the purpose.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
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Re: THE Mexico Thread Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Subjectivist » Sat 03 Dec 2016, 18:54:18

Pemex’s chance to enter the modern oil era hangs in the balance of the country’s Dec. 5 auction.

Mexico will hold its first-ever deep-water auction on Monday -- part of an effort to attract investment from international oil giants such as Exxon Mobil Corp., Chevron Corp. and BP Plc to help develop the country’s offshore oil properties.

The auction of 10 deep-water blocks is the most significant step yet in Mexico’s effort to reclaim its spot as a global crude-producing powerhouse. Pemex has suffered from repeated setbacks in recent years as its production declined and financial woes multiplied. Monday could mark the start of a turnaround in the state-owned company’s fortunes.

"I’m nervous, but I have high expectations," Jose Antonio Gonzalez Anaya, Pemex’s chief executive officer, said Thursday on Bloomberg Television. "It would be the first time in history that Pemex has a joint venture in the upstream with risk involved."

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... wly-erodes
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