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THE Nuclear Waste Thread (merged)

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Re: THE Nuclear Waste Thread (merged)

Unread postby kublikhan » Mon 04 Mar 2019, 15:38:51

Tanada wrote:Video

For those who are confused.
This video is full of "republicans good, democrats bad" without acknowledging that The Yucca Mountain Repository is opposed for far simpler reasons: NIMBY. Nevada Democrats and Republicans seem to have united on this issue to do everything they can to block the Yucca Mountain Repository. Even if the country as a whole would benefit from a centralized nuclear storage facility, it is not something that locals are going to be happy about having in their back yard.

Supporters of the controversial Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada face a familiar fate despite bipartisan momentum to restart progress on the site: Once again, their hopes appear dashed by a Silver State senator. For years the Senate spoiler was the chamber’s top Democrat, Harry Reid, who departed in 2017. This year Republican Dean Heller played the role, a vocal opponent of the project who faces an uphill re-election bid in a state that went for Hillary Clinton and Democratic Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto in 2016. The outcome: Funding backed by the House to restart the Yucca process was dropped in the conference agreement on the three-bill spending package that includes the fiscal 2019 Energy-Water title, unveiled Monday. It also means bipartisan House legislation to restart the project will likely linger untouched by the Senate this Congress.

Nevada says ‘no’
Nevada has long opposed hosting the nation’s nuclear waste, especially since it does not have nuclear power plants within its borders. Opponents say the site and the movement of waste there represent significant public health and safety risks that could expose Nevadans and others to deadly radioactivity in the event of accidents or groundwater leakage. Heller wasn’t the only Nevada lawmaker to oppose restarting the Yucca project. His challenger, Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen, was equally eager to show Nevada voters she had what it takes to stop the project. Cortez Masto also mounted opposition on the Hill. “Once again, the U.S. House of Representatives has failed in its relentless pursuit to turn Nevada into our nation’s nuclear waste dump,” Heller said in a statement Monday. “As long as I’m in the U.S. Senate, you can count on me to never let up on my fight to keep nuclear waste out of the state of Nevada.”
Yucca Mountain Halted Again as GOP Aims to Retain Senate

Nevada officials have put every ounce of their political muscle into stopping the dump, worried that a radioactive spill or even the possibility of one could destroy their tourist economy. There are also fears that, in the distant future, the dump might leak radioactivity into groundwater supplies — that has happened at several Energy Department plants. The state is quickly gearing up for a new fight, readying new legal strategies and pushing a resolution through the state Legislature. Cortez Masto said the state is united against the dump across party lines, including Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval, another former attorney general. "Yucca Mountain is just a hole in the ground," she said in an interview. "It is time for members of Congress to recognize that Yucca Mountain won't work." Sandoval said he had "reaffirmed my unwavering opposition to any potential progress toward developing the site as a potential destination for high-level nuclear waste."

In 1987 Congress directed the Energy Department to put a single dump in Nevada, ending what was supposed to be a process of scientific evaluation. The state quickly branded the legislation "The Screw Nevada Act." The state shocked the Energy Department with its political and legal tenacity. It successfully fought the federal standard that said the site must be capable of keeping any waste isolated for 10,000 years. A federal court ruled the waste had to be kept safe for many hundreds of thousands of years — as long or longer than humans have roamed the Earth. The state engineer shut off water to the site. Las Vegas officials threatened to arrest anybody who tried to transport waste through the city. Nevada has filed some 300 legal "contentions" against the Energy Department's license, each of which must be examined by a special board. The state is swinging into action to file even more contentions if the license action is resumed, said Robert Halstead, chief of the state's nuclear office.
Decades-old war over Yucca Mountain nuclear dump resumes under Trump budget plan

Nevada voters oppose renewed efforts to reopen the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste storage site and don’t favor the recently approved hikes in hotel room taxes to help finance a possible NFL stadium in Las Vegas. Both policies are opposed by large majorities of Nevada voters. Nevada political leaders largely oppose efforts to revisit Yucca — Republican Sen. Dean Heller and Democratic Rep. Dina Titus have introduced identical legislation designed to make it more difficult for the site to open without explicit approval from the state.
The Independent Poll: Yucca, stadium taxes unpopular with voters
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Re: THE Nuclear Waste Thread (merged)

Unread postby dissident » Tue 05 Mar 2019, 00:14:22

Poor Democrats. They think that they are misrepresented.

It remains a fact that Democrat presidents have undermined US nuclear waste treatment development. Carter was a total loon. How can anyone sane promote indefinite storage when there is a choice to further burn the "waste" and leave actinide waste that decays in less than 300 years. Obama's actions are transcendentally retarded as well:

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/sto ... =101689489

Total schizophrenia. We don't want nuclear waste, but we will undermine any effort to actually get rid of it.
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Re: THE Nuclear Waste Thread (merged)

Unread postby kublikhan » Tue 05 Mar 2019, 00:59:47

Dissident, there is currently bipartisan support for the Yucca Mountain repository. Except in Nevada where there is bipartisan opposition.

Bipartisan Support for Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Bill — Except in Nevada
The House will take up legislation this week that would help restart the stalled process for making Nevada’s Yucca Mountain a central repository for commercial nuclear waste. After years of false starts and misses, the bill is moving with bipartisan support. In Nevada, however, there is bipartisan opposition to the Yucca project, and the state’s congressional delegation prepared a series of amendments meant to ensure that the House would consider key safety provisions for the project, which is located about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas and adjacent to the land where the government tested nuclear weapons.

Nevada opposition
Local opposition to the Yucca site has always been strong, but this year two members of the Nevada delegation, Republican Sen. Dean Heller and Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen, are heading toward a close Senate race against each other in November. Both oppose the project. The state’s resistance extends back to when Congress first officially designated Yucca Mountain as the nation’s commercial waste repository in 1987 as an update to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Dubbed the “screw Nevada bill” by Democrat Harry Reid — a freshman senator at the time — the law moved forward without the support of Nevada lawmakers. Critics complained that the site and shipment of nuclear waste through the state could expose citizens to radioactivity via leaks into the water tables or a potential shipping derailment.

But with the Trump administration renewing interest in moving Yucca Mountain forward, Nevada lawmakers are seeing the potential for a second “screw Nevada” congressional moment. “This legislation is Screw Nevada 2.0,” Titus said in a statement. “Nevada is not a wasteland, and I’ll continue to fight any attempt to turn it into the nation’s nuclear waste dumping ground.”
Bipartisan Support for Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Bill — Except in Nevada
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Re: THE Nuclear Waste Thread (merged)

Unread postby Tanada » Tue 05 Mar 2019, 14:37:42

Funny thing, the State of Nevada opposes Yucca mountain repository, but the people who actually live there are eager for the jobs and taxes it will result in for their poor section of the state and are majority in favor.
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Re: THE Nuclear Waste Thread (merged)

Unread postby kublikhan » Tue 05 Mar 2019, 16:48:55

Tanada wrote:Funny thing, the State of Nevada opposes Yucca mountain repository, but the people who actually live there are eager for the jobs and taxes it will result in for their poor section of the state and are majority in favor.
The people of Nevada oppose the Yucca mountain Repository as well. Some support it for the money it would bring in. But overall Nevadans oppose it. It's been that way for a long time now. Nevada's opposition to nuclear goes back longer than Yucca Mountain. Back in 1951, The Atomic Energy Commission started testing nuclear bombs in Nevada and continued to do so for decades. They told Nevadans this was perfectly safe. Nevada even started inviting tourists to come watch the "mushroom clouds". It was only later when Nevadans learned that atomic fallout is actually dangerous that they got angry at being lied to. The nation's first nuclear waste repository was opened in Nevada in 1962 in Beatty, Nevada. However it started leaking. In 2015 there was an explosion there. Nevadans' opposition to nuclear waste is understandable in the context of these events.

2003 - A majority of Nevadans are still opposed to the Energy Department's plan to store nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain. A poll conducted for Nevada released Thursday found that 75 percent oppose locating the high-level waste storage site at Yucca Mountain about 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Only slightly more than 20 percent support the project.
75 percent of Nevadans oppose Yucca dumpsite

2004 - Results of an annual statewide survey show that nearly 73 percent of all Nevadans believe the state should continue fighting, rather than seek some sort of deal with the federal government, in Nevada’s battle against the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. If given the chance to vote on the project, the survey found that nearly 77 percent of all Nevadans would vote against it, with only 19 percent saying they would vote for it.
Annual statewide survey shows Nevadans are increasingly opposed to a nuclear waste dump at Yucca Mountain Nearly 77 percent oppose it, with 73 percent saying don’t make any deals.

2007 - Nevada voters remain overwhelmingly opposed to federal plans to store the nation’s nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, according to a statewide poll published Tuesday. 76 percent oppose the project. The survey also found that opposition to the project crosses party lines.
Poll finds Nevada voters strongly oppose Yucca

2017 - The roots of statewide resentment
Two-thirds of Nevadans oppose this plan, according to a 2017 poll. The state’s experience with federal actions, including nuclear weapons and waste, may help explain the proposed repository’s long-standing unpopularity.

In 1951, seeking a cheaper domestic location for nuclear tests and research, the Atomic Energy Commission chose part of Nellis. Until 1963, the Nevada Test Site was the scene of about 100 aboveground atomic tests, with more than 800 additional underground tests to follow until nuclear testing ceased in 1992. When aboveground testing began, Nevada cashed in. The governor welcomed the chance to see the desert “blooming with atoms.” Las Vegas marketed the mushroom cloud as a tourist attraction, as well as an atomic hairdo and cocktail. Atomic Energy Commission pamphlets and videos declared the tests to be harmless to those living nearby.

After learning more about the health dangers associated with nuclear fallout, Nevadans began to trust the government less. Repeated leaks and safety issues at the nation’s first low-level nuclear waste dump, opened in 1962 in Beatty, Nevada, eventually led to its closure in 1992.
Separately, some rural Nevadans came to resent federal regulations overall, especially after the federal government increased the Bureau of Land Management’s regulatory powers in the mid-1970s. Their Sagebrush Rebellion sought state control over almost all federal lands within Nevada’s borders and spread throughout the rural West.
The federal government has long treated Nevada as a dumping ground, and it’s not just Yucca Mountain

2018 - But there is one spot in that record that may haunt Heller: an opinion penned by Kavanaugh compelling the federal government to move forward with a nuclear waste storage project deeply unpopular in his home state of Nevada.
The Energy 202: Kavanaugh's court decision on Yucca Mountain could be campaign issue in Nevada Senate race
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Re: THE Nuclear Waste Thread (merged)

Unread postby Zarquon » Fri 08 Mar 2019, 15:51:44

https://www.counterpunch.org/2011/12/15 ... -watchdog/

"...
Obama himself has had a long and unpleasing record of engagement with the nuclear industry, notably the Exelon Corporation, which has been making generous provision to Obama’s campaign chest ever since his days in the Illinois Senate, where he performed various useful services on the corporation’s behalf. It should therefore have come as no surprise that when a vacancy arose on the NRC board early in his administration, Obama nominated Magwood.

The nomination was opposed by over a hundred organizations which vainly cited Magwood’s shameful record as a tout for the industry he was now supposed to regulate. Once installed early in 2010, he showed every sign of a zealous commitment to advancing the priorities of the nuclear power industry.
...
Opposing the infamous bill was freshman Senator Harry Reid. Outraged and humiliated by the way that legislators from Washington state and Texas, the two other nominees for a waste site, had effectively consigned Nevada to be the radioactive trash dump, Reid, a former amateur boxer, remarked that “sometimes you have to go round the back of the bar” to finish a fight.

In ensuing years, as the construction crews tunneled away into the depths of the mountain, Reid took several initiatives to ensure that Yucca Mountain never opened for business. First, he advanced through the Democratic leadership to become Majority Leader in 2006. Second, he maneuvered successfully to move Nevada’s Democratic caucuses to January, thus rendering them potentially crucial in the nomination race. This had the natural consequence of generating fervent pledges from Barack Obama and Hilary Clinton in 2008 that, so long as there was breath in their bodies, Yucca Mountain would never hold nuclear waste. Thirdly, Reid recruited as his appropriations director and science policy adviser Gregory Jaczko, a former aide to veteran anti-nuke congressman Ed Markey. Fourth, he induced George W. Bush in 2005, to nominate Jaczko as a Commissioner to the NRC in exchange for dropping Democratic opposition to a number of federal judgeships. Following Obama’s presidential victory, Reid demanded and secured Jaczko’s appointment as Chairman of the NRC.
..."
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