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Antarctica 2021

Antarctica 2021

Unread postby Tanada » Mon 04 Jan 2021, 17:07:59

India to launch scientific expedition to Antarctica
According to the Ministry of Earth Science, the chartered ice-class vessel MV Vasiliy Golovnin will make this journey and will reach Antarctica in 30 days. After leaving behind a team of 40 members, it would return to India in April 2021. On return, it will also bring back the winter team of the preceding trip.

The scientific and logistic activities of the 40th Indian Antarctic expedition are limited due to the existing challenges associated with COVID-19 pandemic, it added.

The focus is to support the ongoing scientific projects on climate change, geology, ocean observations, electric and magnetic flux measurements, environmental monitoring; resupplying of food, fuel, provisions and spare and accomplishing the return of the winter crew.

The Indian Antarctic expeditions began in 1981. The first trip comprised of a team of 21 scientists and support staff led by Dr SZ Qasim. After a humble beginning, the Indian Antarctic programme has now credited to have built three permanent research base stations in Antarctica--named Dakshin Gangotri, Maitri, and Bharati.

As of today, India has two operational research stations in Antarctica named Maitri and Bharati. The National Centre for Polar and Ocean Research(NCPOR), Goa, manages the entire Indian Antarctic program.

The preceding 39th Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica was launched in November 2019. After completing its mission mandate, it returned to India in May of 2020.

"India is committed to maintaining the continent of Antarctica free of COVID-19. The expedition will duly follow all protocols for the deployment of men and material as per the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs(COMNAP). Extra precautions of sanitizing the cargo, mandatory fourteen days of quarantine (pre- and post-expedition), and RT-PCR testing before boarding the ice-class vessel is also being conducted," the Ministry said.


Mumbai Mirror
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Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby Tanada » Mon 04 Jan 2021, 17:15:10

Lots of pictures at link below quote.
Is Sustainable Travel to Antarctica Actually Possible?
Or is last-chance tourism causing more harm to the continent?

Antarctica: a traveler’s final frontier. Once the other six continents get marked off a checklist, this destination sings out like a siren, tempting those curious enough to heed the call. Will the journey be long? Yes, expect at least four days through the nausea-inducing Drake Passage. Will it put a dent in your wallet? Absolutely, with the most basic of expeditions costing thousands of dollars. But, if you save up, have the time off of work, and can handle seasickness, you can experience the largely uninhabited southernmost continent.

But should you?

Every year, more intrepid travelers make their way to Antarctica. According to the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators (IAATO), over 55,000 people traveled to the continent for the 2018-2019 season. This marks a 53% increase from the 2014-2015 season.

Of course, 2020 has been a bit different. With strict stay-at-home orders, domestic travel restrictions, and global flight bans, travelers hoping to cross this experience off of their bucket list have had to wait a while longer. Could that be for the best though? After all, concerns of over-tourism plagued the travel industry pre-pandemic, with certain destinations appearing on the 2020 Fodor’s No List. Maybe nature could use the break.

Even when travel resumes, though, a growing interest in tourism won’t immediately turn the Antarctic peninsula into the likes of overcrowded Barcelona or Big Sur—after all, people save and plan for years for this kind of trip. Still, it’s impossible to ignore the headlines of rapidly melting glaciers and abnormally warm waters and not feel a bit of concern for the planet. For some, it creates an even bigger push to go there, a trend dubbed “last-chance tourism.” For others, there is concern regarding if any form of travel to the continent, both past and in the future, is sustainable at all.

Antarctica has long been a place dedicated to research. The Antarctic Treaty, signed in 1959, established the continent as a scientific preserve, a safe place for scientists of different nationalities to conduct their work in peace at their respective research stations. Then, in 1966, Lars-Eric Lindblad (founder of Lindblad Expeditions) brought the first passenger ship to Antarctica, and regular sightseeing flights began in 1977.

But the Antarctic Treaty wasn’t put into place for tourism—that’s where IAATO comes in. The member organization, established in 1991, advocates for responsible tourism in Antarctica. Today, IAATO includes over 100 companies from around the world, all of whom follow strict guidelines. For example, people must carefully clean all of their clothing and equipment (from gloves to tripods) before setting foot on Antarctica, and only 100 visitors maximum can go ashore at a dedicated landing site. And while membership to IAATO is voluntary, currently all tours on passenger ships to Antarctica are operated by members.

But even by following these rules—walking only in the designated areas, leaving no trace, and keeping a healthy distance from wildlife—do tourists still leave an impact?

“Yes, we have an impact,” admitted Karin Strand, VP Expedition of Hurtigruten and Godmother of the MS Roald Amundsen, a vessel that made history in November 2019 as the first hybrid electric-powered passenger ship to sail to Antarctica. Karin began traveling to Antarctica in 2002 and has since been there over 140 times.

“But what I’ve been pondering over the last 18 years is, what is that impact?” she continued. “If we walk on the snow, that impact is temporary because when the snow melts our footprints will be gone. If we were walking on moss or lichen our impact would be more permanent, but we’re not. That’s part of the rules and regulations—we avoid all kinds of areas where we will make a lasting impact in a negative way.”

Karin gave the example of a landing site called Aitcho. Over time, the path used there grew in width from people going up and down it, and as a result that particular area closed to visitors. It remains closed, but after only a few years it has recovered.

“The mantra here is we leave minor to transitory impact,” Karin added. “When I see how little the landing sites have changed over the last 18 years, I have great faith in the way we are managing the sites.”

Tourism can also have a positive impact by getting travelers involved in research. Allison Cusick is a graduate student pursuing her Ph.D. at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego in the lab of Dr. Maria Vernet, and she created a citizen science project with Ph.D. student Martina Mascioni. Their project, Fjord Phyto, examines phytoplankton communities in the fjords of Antarctica with the help of travelers. Allison leads small groups on Zodiac boats to use some of the same tools oceanographers use, measuring things like the water’s salinity or transparency. This can highlight shifts throughout the seasons and how that might relate to the amount of freshwater present from melting glaciers.

“I had a gentleman tell me one year that when he did the science boat, he felt, for the first time in a long time, that childlike spark of curiosity,” Allison recalled. “I was like, ‘Oh my god, that’s what I’m looking for.’ That’s the whole point. People get a glimpse into the scientific process because they actually do it themselves.”
Global warming is the bigger issue—and perhaps by experiencing Antarctica firsthand, it will make people stronger advocates for the environment when they return home.

Baba Dioum, a forestry engineer, famously said, “In the end, we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; and we will understand only what we are taught.” While it’s a sad truth that the glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula are retreating (a whopping 87% of them), going ashore to snap photos of adorable penguins isn’t the real problem here. Global warming is the bigger issue—and perhaps by experiencing Antarctica firsthand, it will make people stronger advocates for the environment when they return home.

“We all come down to Antarctica because we love how wild it still is,” added Allison. “So how do you keep it that way?”

While you patiently await the chance to safely travel again, you can take the time now to reflect on preserving the wildness of any place you visit. What more economical options do you have for transportation? In what ways can you be more ethical with your animal interactions while traveling? How can you embrace nanotourism, a type of travel that eschews over-tourism and instead focuses on meaningful interactions? These kinds of questions can guide travelers to make any trip more sustainable.

Specifically, in regards to Antarctica, Karin added one last bit of good news: profit isn’t the driving force for tourism there. “The people who run this business, more or less, are people with the right academia who are not driven by money.” With scientists making the guidelines and submitting recommendations to the treaty and the polar institutes of the world, the tour companies—and, in turn, tourists—must follow these if they want to experience the continent for themselves. “That’s what makes me so hopeful.”


Antarctic Travel
Alfred Tennyson wrote:We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
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Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby Tanada » Tue 05 Jan 2021, 13:15:07

Something that has been almost ignored by the MSM in favor of political BS talking points.
After decades of slow growth of the Antarctic Sea Ice which was touted by climate deniers as proof that global warming was not real in the winter of 2017-18 Antarctica had a HUGE decline bringing its levels in line with e decades of Arctic sea ice decline we had been witnessing.

Image

2017 is the Antarctic sea ice low record now, but 2018 and 2019 were pretty darn close. This mirrors the behavior of the Arctic where 2005, then 2007 set records followed for a few years of near look alike's in 2008, 2011 before 2012 set a new record low. Antarctic sea ice normally bottoms around the first of March.
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Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby jawagord » Sun 03 Oct 2021, 18:34:52

Waiting for the believers to tout this as proof that a warming earth leads to colder temperatures!

…….Antarctica was mired in a deep, deep freeze. That’s typically the case during the southernmost continent’s winter months, but 2021 was different. The chill was exceptional, even for the coldest location on the planet.The average temperature at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station between April and September, a frigid minus-78 degrees (minus-61 Celsius), was the coldest on record, dating back to 1957. This was 4.5 degrees lower than the most recent 30-year average. The extreme cold over Antarctica helped push sea ice levels surrounding the continent to their 5th highest level on record in August, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

Extraordinarily cold weather continues to grip the Antarctic Plateau. Maximiliano Herrera, a climatologist who monitors world weather extremes, tweeted that temperature at Russia’s Vostok Station sunk to minus-110.9 degrees (minus-79.4 Celsius) on Thursday (Sept. 30), which was just one degree (0.6 Celsius) from the world’s lowest temperature on record during October.

https://www.adn.com/nation-world/2021/1 ... ing-world/
Don't deny the peak!
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby Tanada » Sun 03 Oct 2021, 20:42:36

This almost sounds like what would be expected if the Ozone Hole came back at its largest extent. The variability of weather is a fascinating phenomenon.


jawagord wrote:Waiting for the believers to tout this as proof that a warming earth leads to colder temperatures!

…….Antarctica was mired in a deep, deep freeze. That’s typically the case during the southernmost continent’s winter months, but 2021 was different. The chill was exceptional, even for the coldest location on the planet.The average temperature at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station between April and September, a frigid minus-78 degrees (minus-61 Celsius), was the coldest on record, dating back to 1957. This was 4.5 degrees lower than the most recent 30-year average. The extreme cold over Antarctica helped push sea ice levels surrounding the continent to their 5th highest level on record in August, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

Extraordinarily cold weather continues to grip the Antarctic Plateau. Maximiliano Herrera, a climatologist who monitors world weather extremes, tweeted that temperature at Russia’s Vostok Station sunk to minus-110.9 degrees (minus-79.4 Celsius) on Thursday (Sept. 30), which was just one degree (0.6 Celsius) from the world’s lowest temperature on record during October.

https://www.adn.com/nation-world/2021/1 ... ing-world/
Alfred Tennyson wrote:We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Mon 04 Oct 2021, 17:41:08

jawagord wrote:Waiting for the believers to tout this as proof that a warming earth leads to colder temperatures!

…….Antarctica was mired in a deep, deep freeze. That’s typically the case during the southernmost continent’s winter months, but 2021 was different. The chill was exceptional, even for the coldest location on the planet.The average temperature at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station between April and September, a frigid minus-78 degrees (minus-61 Celsius), was the coldest on record, dating back to 1957. This was 4.5 degrees lower than the most recent 30-year average. The extreme cold over Antarctica helped push sea ice levels surrounding the continent to their 5th highest level on record in August, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

Extraordinarily cold weather continues to grip the Antarctic Plateau. Maximiliano Herrera, a climatologist who monitors world weather extremes, tweeted that temperature at Russia’s Vostok Station sunk to minus-110.9 degrees (minus-79.4 Celsius) on Thursday (Sept. 30), which was just one degree (0.6 Celsius) from the world’s lowest temperature on record during October.

https://www.adn.com/nation-world/2021/1 ... ing-world/

When a huge proportion of the earth over time isn't warming, according to CREDIBLE sources, be sure and get back to us.

Meanwhile, in the real world of facts and data trends, warming continues (vs. denier cherry picking):

https://climate.nasa.gov/vital-signs/gl ... mperature/

https://www.climate.gov/news-features/u ... emperature

https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/202107

But I know. You have empty rhetoric (sans credible citations). Who could POSSIBLY compete with THAT, with "credible" leaders like Trump on your side? :roll: :idea:
Given the track record of the perma-doomer blogs, I wouldn't bet a fast crash doomer's money on their predictions.
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby dissident » Fri 08 Oct 2021, 13:27:01

The usual weather=climate inanity from the clowns living in denial.

They should be certified as autistics since no amount of teaching about the facts makes them learn.
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby mousepad » Fri 08 Oct 2021, 16:27:47



The page shows data going back to 1880 and the increase in temperature about 1degC.

Does anybody know how this is measured? Every once-in-a-while I have to measure some temperature on the job and I learned that it is extremely difficult to get good absolute accuracy. And most temperature sensors that are accurate to maybe +/-0.1 degC require prior calibration with a more accurate 2nd instrument.
How accurate are those surface temperature measurements? Especially those measurements back in 1880? How did they do that? Can those measurements be trusted?
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby FamousDrScanlon » Fri 08 Oct 2021, 19:39:25

dissident wrote:The usual weather=climate inanity from the clowns living in denial.

They should be certified as autistics since no amount of teaching about the facts makes them learn.


Deniers are manageable as long as they don't miss Judge Wapner.

https://youtu.be/Bp9AClR8qCY
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Re: Antarctica 2021

Unread postby Tanada » Fri 08 Oct 2021, 22:09:12

mousepad wrote:


The page shows data going back to 1880 and the increase in temperature about 1degC.

Does anybody know how this is measured? Every once-in-a-while I have to measure some temperature on the job and I learned that it is extremely difficult to get good absolute accuracy. And most temperature sensors that are accurate to maybe +/-0.1 degC require prior calibration with a more accurate 2nd instrument.
How accurate are those surface temperature measurements? Especially those measurements back in 1880? How did they do that? Can those measurements be trusted?


First this chart is about the global average not the remotest part of Africa/Antarctica/Australia temperatures.

Second when they mark the chart Land/Sea Temperatures they pretty much mean it as the soil temperature below the frost line wherever they are measuring on land and the temperature of a bucket of water pulled straight out of the ocean in a general location. For a very long time scientific expeditions have been recording those sorts of numbers as they travel around measuring things. The temperatures recorded are at a specific time and date, not a constant stream of data from a fixed location where readings are taken every hour or even every 15 minutes. The British government in particular had meteorological recording stations scattered all over their empire in the 1880's where air and soil temperatures, precipitation amounts, wind direction and speed and pan evaporation rates were recorded with great regularity. All the basic equipment can fit in a small fenced off location just about anywhere and what was learned has been of huge benefit to climate and weather modeling.
Image
Alfred Tennyson wrote:We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
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