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Page added on December 16, 2018

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Will peak oil save Earth’s climate?

Enviroment

This year, international delegates gathered in Katowice, Poland for the thirty-second international climate meeting in 40 years. As they dithered over whether they should “welcome” or “note” the 1.5°C pathways report they had commissioned, our world was on pace to set another all-time record of 10.88 billion tonnes of annual carbon emissions. Carbon-dioxide in our atmosphere has reached over 412 parts per million, 47% higher than pre-industrial levels, and higher than any time in the last four million years.

In spite of record increases in solar and wind energy development, human carbon emissions continue to rise because, over the last decade, fossil fuel use has grown ten-times faster than renewable energy use. In spite of good intentions, nothing we have achieved has actually reduced oil, gas, and coal use. Given the slow pace of climate action, some ecologists have wondered if peak oil production might arrive in time to forestall runaway global heating.

Oil industry disinformation has unnecessarily confused the biophysical fact of peak oil. Non-renewable or very-slowly-renewable resources — such as oil and coal — typically exhibit a bell-shaped production curve, with a rise, peak, and decline. Conventional oil from drilled wells appears to have reached its peak. As conventional oil production begins to decline, that process could help reduce carbon emissions. However, of course, there’s a catch.

How peak oil is disguised

Oil companies and oil producing nations will claim that peak oil is not a real phenomenon or will not occur for many decades. To support this opinion, they use deception, re-defining what we once meant by “oil.” In late 2004, conventional oil production — typically from drilled wells — stopped growing and has since been on a long plateau, indicating the natural production peak.

Meanwhile, the alleged “increase” in oil production has been achieved with dirty, marginal, low-net energy grunge petroleum, financed with massive debt, stock scams, and outright Ponzi schemes. The swindle has had a disastrous effect on ecosystems, on our atmosphere, on the world economy.

The following graphic, prepared from US Energy Information Administration data by Art Berman of Labyrinth Consulting, reveals the plateau of conventional oil production since late 2004, and the growth of so-called “unconventional” oil:

Chart by Art Berman, Labyrinth Consulting.

Conventional oil plateau, the top of the bell curve. © Chart by Art Berman, Labyrinth Consulting.

Since 2000, as world traditional oil production stagnated, the amount of “unconventional” oil has tripled, from five to 15 million barrels per day. Ecologists who care about global heating, would rather see all oil production declining, but we should pay special attention to the carbon-intensive unconventional petroleum now being dredged from the Earth with what the industry calls “enhanced oil recovery.”

Destructive methods such as fracking and surface mining, produce low-quality, high-carbon sludge erroneously defined as “oil.” These expensive, energy-intensive processes require so much heat that the net energy delivered to society plummets, while ecological costs sky-rocket.

Net energy is an important piece of the puzzle. To produce a hundred barrels of oil in the 1940s and 50s, during the hay-day of cheap oil, companies could invest about one barrel of energy, a very profitable 100:1 net energy. Ninety-nine percent of the energy produced, could be delivered to society.

An Open-Pit Mine at the Alberta Tar Sand © Greenpeace / E M

An Open-Pit Mine at the Alberta Tar Sand © Greenpeace / E M

Today, in the tar sands or shale oil fracking fields, a hundred barrels of oil requires 25 to 50 barrels of oil-energy to produce a lower quality, dirtier product. Not only is this not very profitable in dollars, the process destroys ecosystems, increases carbon emissions, costs more to refine, is harder to clean up when spilled, discharges toxic effluents, and delivers far less actual energy to society. Tar sands bitumen can be burned for energy, but it is not “oil,” and adding bitumen onto “oil production” is like tacking the chaff onto the wheat harvest, a deception designed to disguise peak conventional oil and forestall the urgent transition to renewable energy.

The dregs of ancient sea-beds

Having burned through the high-quality oil, producers are now scouring and fracking the Earth for the dregs of fossil fuels, the so-called “unconventional oil,” in several forms.

“Heavy oils,” are dense, gooey, asphaltic, deposits of organic matter locked in rock and sand. The large molecules incorporate sulfur, metals, waxes, and carbon residue that must be removed, adding to expense and carbon emissions. Bitumen, too thick to move through a pipe without dilution by lighter oil, contains known carcinogens. When spilled from pipelines and ships, the insoluble bitumen sinks to the bottom of rivers, lakes, oceans, and aquifers, requiring massive clean-up costs, and causing decades-long ecological damage. the bitumen requires immense temperatures to convert to fuel, thus more energy lost and carbon emitted.

“Synthetic liquids” include gas-to-liquid (GTL), coal-to-liquid (CTL), and Natural gas plant liquids (NGPL). The infamous IB Farben chemical company introduced a CTL process in the 1930s to provide energy-strapped Nazi Germany with fuel for warfare. The conversion requires substantial heat, high water consumption, toxic waste water, releases significant CO2 emissions, and discharges carcinogens into air, land, and water. Most of these synthetic liquids contain only about 60% of the energy content in conventional crude oil, with twice the ecological impact.

© Sean Gardner / Greenpeace

Oil Rig in the Gulf of Mexico © Sean Gardner / Greenpeace

“Deep Water” oil fields drill in up to three kilometers of ocean water. The Gulf of Mexico contains more than 3,400 deep water wells and the precarious technology is now spreading into the Mediterranean, along the coast of East Africa, and into the Arctic. In 2010, British Petroleum’s deepwater oil rig exploded, spilled some 250 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (some analysts believe much more), killed 11 people, some 82,000 birds, 6,000 sea turtles, and 26,000 marine mammals. In 1991, Shell Oil attempted to dump their deepwater Brent Spar, filled with toxic waste oil, into the North Sea, a plan halted by an historic Greenpeace action. In 2012, Shell’s Kulluk deep water drilling rig ran aground off Kodiak Island. There exists no adequate response to oil spills in the Arctic; relief wells are difficult to drill and oil recovery is nearly impossible in the icy conditions and due to a lack of adequate ships.

“Biofuels” can be useful when produced from waste biomass in small, local applications, but they comprise extremely low-net-energy oils. Making corn ethanol in the US burns about 77% of the energy it provides. Biogas, syngas, ethanol, and biodiesel contain only about 2/3 the energy of conventional gasoline. Carbon dioxide is emitted during both the fermentation and combustion of biofuels. Studies in Brazil and Japan show that biofuel emissions increase air pollution deaths. Commercial biofuels require land for crops, which means a loss of both forest cover and food-agriculture land. According to a University of Minnesota study, to replace 12% of US gasoline consumption with ethanol would require 100% of US corn crops.

Fracking Ponzi scheme

Finally, we come to what the oil industry calls “Tight oil and gas,” locked in dense formations of shale, requiring heat, pressure, and chemicals — fracking — to break apart the rock and allow the oil or gas to flow. Petroleum fuels can be produced from fracking, but the ecological and financial costs are monumental.

A fracking well typically requires some 8 million gallons of water, 40,000 gallons of toxic chemicals, and results in increased carbon emissions. A study at the Colorado School of Public Health, found that oil and gas fracking released toxic toluene, ethyl benzene, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and metals. Exposure to these pollutants are known to cause cancer, organ damage, nervous system disorders, lung disease, birth defects, and death.

Fracking requires so much energy, water, and material that production costs soar. Companies involved in the so-called “US shale-oil boom” have borrowed and lost billions of dollars. According to the Wall Street Journal, since 2010, the US shale industry has spent $265 billion more than it has generated. Nevertheless, insiders make money because the industry works as a giant Ponzi scheme, in which schemers profit from stock scams, leaving later investors with bankrupt companies and depleted oil fields.

Since 1980, the US economy and "oil boom" has been fueled by debt. Chart by Pedro Pietro with data from World Bank.

Since 1980, the US economy and “oil boom” has been fueled by debt. Chart by Pedro Pietro with data from World Bank.

According to a review by Canadian petroleum geologist David Hughes, total US shale oil production peaked in 2004 and has been in decline since. Most of the shale oil comes from two fields in the Permian Basin, in Texas, which have declined by about 80% over 3 years, while incurring a $40 billion cash flow deficit. The Texas Eagle Ford fields peaked in 2015, and companies are spending $4 billion/year on new wells for declining production.

To keep up production, Hughes points out, fracking companies claim they will drill some 1.29 million tight gas wells between now and 2050. At $6 million per well, this amounts to $7.7 trillion. “The industry’s long-term forecasts are unrealistic,” says Hughes, “and likely more designed to maintain share price than to provide a sound energy policy.”

We can, of course, imagine how $7.7 trillion might help finance a transition to renewable energy and lower energy consumption. “Climate change and peak oil are two ends of the same snake,” writes energy analyst Mary Logan in “Thinking Like a System about Climate Science.” Climate change, she believes, is “a proxy for our oil addiction problem,” and the root cause is our “flywheel economy,” that cannot slow down. Oil barons, bankers, and stock swindlers appear willing to extract dirty, carbon-intensive, low-quality fossil fuels to cover up the imminent reality of peak conventional oil, while ignoring the climate crisis. These tycoons and willing governments squeeze marginal profits from their dirty oil rather than help lead humanity into a reasonable transition to a lower-energy and renewable energy future.

greenpeace



45 Comments on "Will peak oil save Earth’s climate?"

  1. Mister Green Genes on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 6:05 pm 

    Afraid not…..peak oil will NOT save anything…this rock is TOAST….

  2. Davy on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 6:55 pm 

    Many unknowns currently in regards to PO, renewables, and the economy. In my opinion a negative like PO is not going to be a positive for anything. It will stunt efforts at limiting emissions and disrupt the economy so there is less effort at building out renewables. It appears to me we are in an energy trap needing copious amounts of energy to transition but not having affordable energy to do it. Renewables are not energy dense enough to do it alone. The economy is unstable with a climate destabilizing. Not much to be optimistic about other than things are still more or less OK. No massive crisis just yet like failed harvests or such.

  3. twocats on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 8:29 pm 

    perfectly said davy

  4. twocats on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 8:51 pm 

    turns out we are going to have both. massive climate change problems that are going to make sustainable, transition communities very unpredictable. lack of easily accessible resources are going to make carrying on any semblance of industrial civilization almost impossible. worst of all worlds.

  5. Cloggie on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 10:14 pm 

    As always, the influence of the technology factor is hugely underestimated. What are “dregs” today with low EROI, can be energetically useful combustable material tomorrow.

    If the climate is going to be saved, it will be because of Paris, Katowice and similar gatherings in the future and subsequent peak oil demand.

  6. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 10:19 pm 

    CLogg

    Paris and peak oil demand? LOL

    It Will Take 131 Years To Replace Oil, And We’ve Only Got 2

    https://www.scribd.com/document/394656677/Future-Sustainability-Forecasting-by-Exchange-Markets-Basic-Theory-and-an-Application-Malyshkina-2010

    Warning of shortage of essential minerals for laptops, cell phones, electric cars, solar panels, wiring
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170320110042.htm

    IEA Sees No Peak Oil Demand ‘Any Time Soon’

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/iea-sees-no-peak-oil-demand-any-time-soon-1488816002

  7. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 10:20 pm 

    Peak Oil may keep Climate Change in Check

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/peak-oil-may-keep-catastrophic-climate-change-in-check/

  8. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 10:24 pm 

    The Collapse of Civilization Manifesto

    https://medium.com/@Cliffhanger1983/the-collapse-of-civilization-manifesto-2039c6a5327

  9. Chrome Mags on Sun, 16th Dec 2018 11:13 pm 

    So in the race to the bottom, we ask ourselves which will happen first, peak oil and it’s ramifications on the economy or catastrophic climate change, and if peak oil hits first and soon, can it stave off the worse effects of climate change? Mankind can milk a mother rat, meaning we are great at using resources and making adjustments as needed on the way down to palukaville. If we can get our hands on it, we’ll cook it, crack it, distribute it, sell it and burn it and with the middle east and Russia with a constant stream of oil coming out for decades, I doubt very much if any kind of feedbacks that hurt the bottom feeders, the poor, will have any impact on the continuation of burning fossil fuels on a mass scale for as many years as it takes to take us all the way down, until even the last super wealthiest person is boiling up their last bag of freeze dried food, all the wildlife is dead, most of the people with them, forests have turned to deserts, and some pump jack is squeaking away with no one to service it.

  10. makati1 on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 12:26 am 

    “The Empire’s Sea of Woes. ..Empire is America’s noose, hubris America’s curse….Hubris won’t generate prosperity, pay debts, keep the disaffected off the streets, or challenge the aspirations of competing global powers….

    “The aristocracy wants to offload the pain to the peasantry, but the riots demonstrate that the peasantry has other ideas. Our betters also want to blame their sea of woes on Eurasia’s leaders, but China, Russia, Turkey, and Iran are having none of that. They are, however, delighted to see the West crumbling and will do nothing to stop it….

    Preceding the fall is that heady feeling of invincibility, just as the those you ignored, scorned, or subjugated on the way up are putting in place their plans to take you down…If hubris and stupidity don’t fell the Empire, insolvency will…

    Meanwhile, the Eurasian powers are building a network of trade, telecommunications, infrastructure, and transport links spanning Halford Mackinder’s center of the world….”

    https://www.theburningplatform.com/2018/12/16/the-empires-sea-of-woes/#more-188651

    Slip slidin’…

  11. Cloggie on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 2:05 am 

    Yet another breakfast with British newspapers…

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/dec/16/brexit-pm-to-urge-parliament-not-to-break-faith-with-the-people

    May is the 21st century Chamberlain that wants to see Britain in Europe as much as possible.

    Raab-kike is the 21st century Churchill that wants to see the UK as ZOGs bitch.

    Another referendum means yet another dangerous confirmation of the deep split in UK society and politics about whose bitch the UK should be? EU or US?

    May sensibly tries to work out a compromise between the two extremes and the Barnier-Raab deal, the result of 2 years of hard negotiations, is the only way forward to achieve a non-destructive compromise and at least leave the crucial UK-EU trade relations in place.

    I’m in favor of the deal as well, because of economics, the less likelihood that the UK is going to be used as the US unsinkable aircraft carrier against Europe after Trump and best of all we get rid of the British politically, so they no longer can block us turning to Russia and China, so Eurasia can finally take over from the Anglos and their disastrous multicult.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/dec/17/saudi-arabia-reject-us-senate-interference-khashoggi-yemen

    Special relationship US-KSA under fire.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/dec/17/vladimir-putin-calendar-sells-out-in-japan

    Japanese recognize the status of Putin as the premier statesman of the 21st century (so far).

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2018/dec/17/2018-a-terrible-year-for-facebook-podcast

    ZOG going down. Mark Faceberg and his Suckerbook lost 15 billion in stock value in 2018.lol

    https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/dec/17/baghdad-green-zone-finally-opens-gates-iraq

    Baghdad Green Zone: Americans out, Khomeiny in.lol Local ZOG-bot mobster still trying to brag that the “US has Eyeraq”.

    They don’t.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/15/world/middleeast/iran-iraq-iranian-power.html

  12. Cloggie on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 2:11 am 

    The return of the thirties.

    Dutch-Flemish fascist organisation Voorpost takes over the streets of Brussels in protest against UN-Marakesh sell-out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ex0iE0CvPMU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3NjCQcUEcA

    https://www.voorpost.org/

    The numbers are surprisingly large. White uprising is coming everywhere in Europe. The 1968 US-oriented generation is going down the drain. Like in the thirties the European right is going to win again… and this time prevail because the globalist (“commie”) Anglos no longer can rely on the USSR/Russia to do the dirty work for them.

    And they all love Putin.

    Europe is going to take over from the US.

  13. I AM THE MOB on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 2:30 am 

    Clogg

    Eat a flaming log of shit. I will only fling poo at you..

    You need a safe space is that why you only post articles from the daily mail?

    Its always the people who point their fingers at others..

  14. makati1 on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 2:34 am 

    “41 Reasons why wind power can not replace fossil fuels”

    http://energyskeptic.com/2018/wind/

    “Oil is used from start to finish…”

    Another bubble popped. LOL

  15. Davy on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 3:26 am 

    Davy’s words of wisdom:

    Pray for the dead and the dead will pray for you.

  16. Go Speed Racer on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 3:55 am 

    What about Peak Sofa’s .

    If we someday run out of old Sofa’s,
    we won’t be able to have Saturday night
    sofa-burning parties, out by the pole-barn.

  17. Go Speed Racer on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 4:03 am 

    Hmmmmmmmmm
    ? Flaming log of shit ?

    Could that be an energy source?

    Possibly. If fully dehydrated using
    natural sunlight. and then burn it
    in a specially engineered incinerator.

    We can build it next to Clogster’s house.
    (O;

  18. Antius on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 4:22 am 

    Greenpeace. I recently watched a video of these cretins protesting at an offshore oil rig in the Arctic.

    They arrived at the scene in a diesel powered ship. It was cold outside, so they all donned warm clothing made from synthetic fibres using naphtha produced in China using oil, and transported to a first world country on a diesel powered cargo ship (no fur allowed due to concerns over animal cruelty, you understand).

    Then they climbed into little kayaks, made from fibreglass reinforced polyethylene (also derived from naphtha that came out of an oil refinery). Then they paddled out to the oil rig using little paddles made from aluminium that was produced in an electrolysis cell powered by coal and nuclear energy, and covered in neoprene rubber, which is also produced from oil derived alkenes. Then they held up plastic signs covered in polymer derived inks, also derived from oil, in order to protest the production of oil.

    At no point in the whole process did the irony of what they were doing appear to dawn on any of these ‘protesters’.

  19. Thedigger on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 4:29 am 

    All this talk about 400 parts per million,they just use the 400 to fool people into thinking it is a high figure,knock two noughts off.
    4 parts per 10000,yeah thats is going to sure heat the earth up

  20. Davy on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 5:01 am 

    “At no point in the whole process did the irony of what they were doing appear to dawn on any of these ‘protesters’.”

    This is not just the green movement it is pretty much across the spectrum of humanity. There are just a few who are awakened to the real science. Those awakened are aware of the trap humanity is in. Even many scientist are living in denial that this situation can be fixed if we would just decarbonize. What they don’t admit is what is meant by decarbonization. The fake greens and the general sheeple public think the economy will actually improve with decarbonization. People are fooled into thinking we can maintain or increase affluence. The Trump deplorables think the economy can be improved by Trumps policies. In China the populous is kept tranquil on a steady diet of debt driven growth. We can’t maintain and increase affluence because of energy issues and systematic macro issues of population and consumption. These forces are beyond policy. Climate change cannot be fixed but it may be something we can mitigate but at great cost. People don’t want to pay this cost if their economic lives are deteriorating. They especially don’t want to pay this cost with the rich getting richer. This point is what we are seeing in Europe when a policy to promote decarbonization was pushed. Some of the French protest are about immigration but most of it is anger with the economy and disgust with the wealth transfer occurring with the wealthiest who are not shouldering the sacrifice they demand. Even the immigration issue is significantly economics based not a racist upwelling. Around the world people have been brainwashed into believing in something better and now the economy is stalling. Just imagine what people are going to do when the decline is aggregate and pronounced. Currently we have growth and economic decline bubbling together in a turbulence of economic activity. Years of malinvestment through unsustainable debt driven economics is faltering. The worst is yet to come. These demonstrations may die down but they will return. They are coming to the US and China soon also because these economies are built on the same unsustainability just with a different manifestation.

  21. Davy on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 5:16 am 

    We don’t hear much about curtailing cement do we. Imagine if we were to attack cement production like we see with the effort against coal.

    “Climate change: The massive CO2 emitter you may not know about”
    https://tinyurl.com/y7tlptyh
    (graph) https://tinyurl.com/y7g8kyuf
    (graph) https://tinyurl.com/ydg5lksq

    Growth of cement industry It is these unrivalled attributes of concrete that have helped boost global cement production since the 1950s, with Asia and China accounting for the bulk of growth from the 1990s onwards. Production has increased more than thirtyfold since 1950 and almost fourfold since 1990. China used more cement between 2011 and 2013 than the US did in the entire 20th Century.

    But with Chinese consumption now appearing to level off, most future growth in construction is expected to happen in the emerging markets of South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa – driven by rapid urbanisation and economic development. The floor area of the world’s buildings is projected to double in the next 40 years, say Chatham House researchers, requiring cement production to increase by a quarter by 2030.

  22. Davy on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 5:41 am 

    “Southwestern US states get Jan. 31 deadline for drought deal”
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhqu5zm

    “LAS VEGAS (AP) – The head of the federal agency controlling the Colorado River said Thursday the U.S. government will impose unprecedented restrictions on water supplies to the seven Southwestern U.S. states that depend on the river unless everyone agrees by Jan. 31 on a plan to deal with an expected shortage in 2020. Water users from Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming should have had a pact to sign at an annual water users’ conference this week in Las Vegas, Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman said. They didn’t. However, a flurry of approvals in several states in recent weeks signaled urgency and set a stage for an overall agreement to use less water from a river beset by drought and locked into promises to deliver more water than it takes in. Burman identified California and Arizona as the holdouts.”

  23. I AM THE MOB on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 6:41 am 

    Guardian most trusted newspaper in Britain, says industry report

    https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/dec/17/guardian-most-trusted-newspaper-in-britain-says-industry-report

    Sorry Clogg Daily mail and the Sun didn’t make the cut..Only fringe nutters read those..

  24. I AM THE MOB on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 6:53 am 

    Davy

    I know why you only post from zerohedge..You need a safe space..That is why you wont read anything else..Closed minded and proud!

    Typical trust fund baby!

  25. The Truth Shall Set You Free on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 7:24 am 

    “Greenpeace. I recently watched a video of these cretins protesting at an offshore oil rig in the Arctic (no fur allowed due to concerns over animal cruelty, you understand).”

    Typical comment one would expect from a cruel and selfish Trumptard//RepubliCON- par for the course. No doubt you have never seen how furs are harvested.

  26. Antius on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 7:26 am 

    Peak Diesel is going to send global economic growth into a tailspin. In practical terms, we reached peak oil in 2007. By cracking fuel oil and petroleum cokes into diesel; refineries succeeded in kicking the can down the road for another six years. Now, available fuel oil supplies are tapering towards zero and shale oil is too light to convert into diesel. The US is running out of asphalt needed to continue repairing its roads, as all heavy oils are being diverted into cracking columns.

    In practical terms, the world economy has hit a peak in usable transport fuels. With or without US-China trade issues, there is little hope that global trade volumes and domestic transportation of goods can continue to grow, without a growing supply of diesel.

    https://www.ft.com/content/4c1d142a-4ecf-11e8-9471-a083af05aea7

    Some extracts from the FT article:

    “But the backlash against diesel in the developed world masks a wider trend in oil markets. Diesel, rather than sputtering, has been roaring. Some oil traders and analysts are now even warning that supplies of the fuel could become uncomfortably tight this summer.”

    “One reason why diesel markets have been strong despite the negative headlines is that it remains the fuel most closely associated with global economic growth. Hauling freight by truck, sea or air? Diesel. Construction growth? Diggers and cranes don’t run on air. Mining metal ores or drilling for oil in far-flung corners of the globe? Diesel generators fill in the gaps that the power grid doesn’t reach.”

    “Longer-term consumption of diesel will also be boosted in just over 18 months, when new shipping regulations force vessels to burn lower sulphur diesel rather than polluting bunker fuel. That could add 3m barrels or more to global diesel demand in short order.”

    “While gasoline and other fuels have experienced a commensurate or greater rise in output, diesel production has been largely flat. The mystery to this conundrum, some traders suggest, lies in the US shale revolution that the world now relies on to keep oil markets well supplied.”

    “As US shale is particularly light, having been released through the fracturing of narrow fissures in rocks, some in the industry have been warning that it does not yield as much diesel and other so-called middle distillates, instead producing more ‘top-of-the-barrel’ lighter products such as gasoline and feedstocks for petrochemical plants.”

  27. SOCK PUPPET on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 8:22 am 

    “The Truth Shall Set You Free on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 7:24 am “Greenpeace. I recently watched a video of these cretins protesting at an offshore oil rig in the Arctic (no fur allowed due to concerns over animal cruelty, you understand).” Typical comment one would expect from a cruel and selfish Trumptard//RepubliCON- par for the course. No doubt you have never seen how furs are harvested.”

  28. Davy on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 8:25 am 

    “Now, available fuel oil supplies are tapering towards zero and shale oil is too light to convert into diesel. The US is running out of asphalt needed to continue repairing its roads, as all heavy oils are being diverted into cracking columns.”

    Not seeing this anywhere here in the US nor am I reading about it.

  29. Davy on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 8:32 am 

    Sniveling millennial idiot says:

    “Davy I know why you only post from zerohedge..You need a safe space..”

    These were my morning post. Some found from reviewing ZH, some from Rice Farmer, and others from MSM. Get your facts right MOB. You are about as dumb as they come Mr. I am a Chemistry PHD.
    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/12/14/france-in-turmoil-blame-russia.html
    https://www.dlacalle.com/en/the-ecbs-quantitative-easing-failure/
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-12-17/asos-cuts-guidance-after-significant-deterioration-in-november?srnd=premium
    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46455844
    https://kdminer.com/news/2018/dec/15/southwestern-us-states-get-jan-31-deadline-drought/

  30. Antius on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 9:22 am 

    Cloggie has discussed ammonia as an alternative fuel before. It is attractive as an alternative fuel, as it can be manufactured entirely from atmospheric nitrogen and hydrogen. All of the energy inputs can come from non-fossil sources. It can also be burned efficiently in compression ignition engines with minimal modifications and can be stored as a chilled liquid at -32C or as a compressed saturated liquid at room temperature. It is probably the most practical way of implementing a hydrogen economy, given its easy storability and its compatibility with existing infrastructure.

    I was initially somewhat sceptical, as ammonia would be only marginally more efficient as an energy store than pure hydrogen. It also has toxicity problems. But it does have other advantages over hydrogen that is less often discussed. In particular, it can be blended with alcohol and gasoline-alcohol blends, to produce hybrid fuels. This article discusses the performance of gasoline hybrid fuels in a spark ignition engine.

    https://nh3fuelassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/nh3fa-2014-shehan-haputhanthri_1.pdf

    Because the blended fuels require less air to burn and have higher octane rating than straight gasoline, engine efficiency is improved, presumably due to lower pumping losses. Blends with up to 30% methanol and 30% ammonia were tested.

    Particularly relevant to the peak diesel issue, is the improved octane rating of ammonia-alcohol-gasoline blended fuels. Whereas conventional gasoline would not be usable in existing marine diesel engines, blending with methanol and ammonia could raise the octane rating of gasoline sufficiently to allow it to be used in place of marine diesel. This is particularly relevant in a world in which diesel production is constrained and gasoline production is not.

  31. GetAVasectomyDudeLifeSuckAss on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 9:37 am 

    Net energy decline is getting more obvious as protest grow. Censorship seems to be increasing on platform like YouTube. On youtube comments section disable and short video only. A lot of protest happen outside of Paris on 15 December in the region but very few news outlet talk about it.

    I feel that every social media will be completely censor and it won’t be possible to see what is happening.

    There were a big manifestation in Belgium.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lxg8hNiTxMo

    I all of this video. Women, old people, children were participating.

    Peak oil will manifest itself first with social chaos.

  32. Duncan Idaho on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 9:48 am 

    Trump Interior Secretary Zinke resigns amid ethics probes – “Surrounding himself with former lobbyists, it quickly became clear that Ryan Zinke was a pawn for the oil and gas industry”

    Guess it is time to throw out the trash?

  33. Dredd on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 10:48 am 

    ” … save Earth’s climate? …

    It depends on how dead Oil-Qaeda makes it, which requires a pattern of accurate measurements (Patterns: Conservative Temperature & Potential Enthalpy).

  34. Darrell Cloud on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 11:33 am 

    Look at this chart. http://davidgalbraith.org/trivia/graph-of-the-population-of-rome-through-history/2189/

    This cycle is as old as time. The landscape is littered with the bones of failed civilizations. You can see them in Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. At some point, peak complexity is reached. Look at the historic chart of Rome’s population from 200 b.c. through the present. The massive population collapse of ancient Rome occurred between 400 a.d. and 600 a.d. One of the triggers for that collapse was radical climate change which began in 536 a.d. A massive die off occurred over a 200 year period. Rome’s population did not recover for the next thousand years.

    What is fascinating is that ancient Rome’s supply chains consisted of sailing ships and ox carts. Its water supply was delivered by a gravity system using aqueducts that were so well built that they continued to function for hundreds of years after the collapse.

    Now look at the right hand portion of the chart. The massive exponential growth of Rome’s population over the last 200 years is astounding. The industrial revolution and access to fossil fuels has made this massive growth possible.

    What is different this time? We have not had the weather event of 536 as of yet. So, that is a plus. We are however seeing evidence that the exponential growth that dominated the last 200 years may be reaching its limits. What we are witnessing is a long term trend where the cheap abundant fossil fuels that made the industrial revolution possible are becoming ever more difficult and therefore ever expensive to extract. The supply chains and the infrastructure that is made possible by these cheap fuels are at risk.

    Rome is no longer supplied by aqueducts, ox carts and sailing ships. It is supplied by a world wide supply chain that is totally dependent on fossil fuels. If the electricity goes off for whatever reason, the food and water will immediately stop. The parabolic assent in population we have witnessed over the last 200 hundred years will flip over to a collapse to the base line to what it was 400 years ago. The return to that base line will not take 200 years if the power goes off. It will more than likely occur within 200 days.

  35. Cloggie on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 11:53 am 

    We don’t hear much about curtailing cement do we. Imagine if we were to attack cement production like we see with the effort against coal.

    It is very well possible to produce cement without large amounts of coal:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/08/06/renewable-cement-production/

    Cloggie has discussed ammonia as an alternative fuel before. It is attractive as an alternative fuel, as it can be manufactured entirely from atmospheric nitrogen and hydrogen. All of the energy inputs can come from non-fossil sources. It can also be burned efficiently in compression ignition engines with minimal modifications and can be stored as a chilled liquid at -32C or as a compressed saturated liquid at room temperature. It is probably the most practical way of implementing a hydrogen economy, given its easy storability and its compatibility with existing infrastructure.

    I was initially somewhat sceptical, as ammonia would be only marginally more efficient as an energy store than pure hydrogen. It also has toxicity problems. But it does have other advantages over hydrogen that is less often discussed. In particular, it can be blended with alcohol and gasoline-alcohol blends, to produce hybrid fuels. This article discusses the performance of gasoline hybrid fuels in a spark ignition engine.

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/04/08/ammonia-as-storage-medium/

    https://ammoniaindustry.com/a-roadmap-for-the-green-hydrogen-economy-in-the-northern-netherlands/

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/first-climate-neutral-power-station-in-the-netherlands/

  36. I AM THE MOB on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 12:08 pm 

    CLogg

    If we could only turn your hate into energy we could power the entire world for centuries!

    Why dont you open up your comment section on your blog? You need a safe space! Pussy!

    LMFAO!

  37. Cloggie on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 12:37 pm 

    If we could only turn your hate into energy we could power the entire world for centuries!

    How can you say that? I love Europe!

    Why dont you open up your comment section on your blog? You need a safe space, CLoggmeister, sir.

    You are too low-IQ to even start a blog, let alone create content for it, you unimaginative dullard.

  38. I AM THE MOB on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 12:57 pm 

    Clogg

    I have my own reddit page
    https://old.reddit.com/r/DieOff/

    You wont love Europe in a few years when their oil supplies start running out!

    HAHAHHA!

  39. yvest on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 1:28 pm 

    Could be, one thing for sure the IPCC never took the resource constraints aspects seriously.
    And when you take them seriously, you get something like that :
    http://www.oleocene.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=2275983#p2275983

    However, you then have to wonder how the population crash will unfold, and how fast, it could also lead to some kind of deforestation like never seen before, also putting the climate in a spin.

  40. Cloggie on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 2:30 pm 

    “I have my own reddit page”

    This is yours?!

    “The War Against Globalism”, by nota bene Giraldi!?

    Written by you and your boyfriend?

    “humans-are-scum” and “cliffhanger1983”.

  41. I AM THE MOB on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 2:46 pm 

    Clogg

    I didn’t post that..I said I have a reddit page, i didn’t say every post is from me..And that post has 0 points and only 43 percent approval..

  42. Cloggie on Mon, 17th Dec 2018 3:47 pm 

    “I didn’t post that..I said I have a reddit page”

    You “have” a blog and yet articles appear you don’t agree with?

    That doesn’t add up, you are lying through your teeth. You do not own a blog. You’re a sad fuck.

  43. Go Speed Racer on Tue, 18th Dec 2018 12:14 am 

    I’m on your side, Clogster.
    Europe invented the steam engine,
    Mozart Eine Kleine Nachtmusik,
    good looking girls,
    and those Marzipan chocolates!

    USA invented Donald Trump,
    fat bible-belt Christian women who
    dine on cans of Crisco and cake frosting,
    and stupid hateful retards who shoot up
    junior high schools with a gunnysack
    full of guns, because they are crazy.

    Unfortunately…. USA also invented liberalism,
    and then bitch-Hillary buddies up with
    bitch Angela Merkel, to fill up your
    Euro-country with ugly nasty Syrian ISIS
    terrorists! Hillary wanted to get
    even with Europe for your invention of
    beautiful european girls. ugly old USA
    nag bitches like Hillary hate that
    there are beautiful european girls because
    Chelsea is uglier than a horse, just ask
    Donald Trump.

  44. Cloggie on Tue, 18th Dec 2018 10:31 am 

    Melanie is pretty, right? The Don has good taste.

    Excellent GSR, people like you we need in the future commonwealth of people of European descent, worldwide. It’s coming.

  45. Fred on Tue, 18th Dec 2018 12:45 pm 

    “This is particularly relevant in a world in which diesel production is constrained and gasoline production is not.”

    Really? Unconstrained as in unlimited gasoline production?

    “Greenpeace. I recently watched a video of these cretins protesting at an offshore oil rig in the Arctic.”

    Oh? So here are some people born in this world that runs on and is addicted to fossil fuels. They’re damn right to protest against drilling for more oil. How should they go about it differently mate? Walk there from where they live? Build a timber raft held together with hemp? Wait, they can’t use timber either as I recall those same protesters arguing we should stop clear cutting old growth forests as well. Most of these activists if not all are well aware they are people from this world too.

    Davy summed it up pretty well. The weathly better start spending their fortunes on things that matter instead of mansions and super yachts. Better yet, everyone in the “better off” world better starts the transformation from thinking what’s best for me to what’s best for us collectively and how we can live on this planet in a way that is truely sustainable so our children and their children can live here too. That way is very different from the current mainly Western lifestyle. A system where one interest group fights another while no one looks after the whole is doomed to fail. And when it fails, it will fail for everyone on this planet.

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