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Analysis: Fossil-fuel Emissions in 2018 Increasing at Fastest Rate for Seven Years

Analysis: Fossil-fuel Emissions in 2018 Increasing at Fastest Rate for Seven Years thumbnail

Hopes that global CO2 emissions might be nearing a peak have been dashed by preliminary data showing that output from fossil fuels and industry will grow by around 2.7% in 2018, the largest increase in seven years.

The new data, from researchers at the Global Carbon Project (GCP), is being published in Earth System Science Data Discussions and Environmental Research Letters to coincide with the UN’s COP24 climate summit in Poland. The rapid increase in 2018 CO2 output from fossil fuel use and industry follows a smaller 1.6% rise in 2017. Before that, three years of flat emissions output to 2016 had raised hopes that emissions had peaked.

This year, the largest increases have occurred in China, driven by government stimulus of the construction industry. US emissions have also increased markedly in 2018, after an unusually cold winter and hot summer helped to drive up energy demand.

Continued emissions growth in 2019 “appear[s] likely”, the researchers say, driven by rising oil and gas use and rapid economic growth. While some progress has been made, they add that the world has not yet reached the point where the energy system is being decarbonised fast enough to offset economic growth.

The increase in overall human-caused CO2 emissions may be smaller than the increase from fossil fuels and industry, the GCP says, up an estimated 0.7% in 2018. This is due to a reduction in land-use emissions offsetting some of the increase from fossil fuels.

Nevertheless, the 2018 increase in emissions puts the world even further away from meeting its climate change goals under the Paris Agreement.

Largest increase in seven years

The GCP is a group of international researchers who assess both sources and sinks of carbon. It has published an annual global carbon budget report since 2006.

Its newly released global carbon budget for 2018 provides estimates of CO2 from fossil fuel and industry  in each country, as well as global emissions from changes in land use. It also estimates how CO2 has accumulated in the atmosphere and how much was absorbed by the land and oceans.

The figure below shows global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels, divided into emissions from China (red shading), India (yellow), the US (bright blue), EU (dark blue) and the remainder of the world (grey). Emissions are expected to rise to a new high of 37.15bn tonnes of CO2 (GtCO2) in 2018, with China and the US as the two largest emitters.

Annual CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry by major country and rest of world from 1959-2018, in billions of tonnes of CO2 per year (GtCO2). Note that 2018 numbers are preliminary estimates. Data from the Global Carbon Project; chart by Carbon Brief using Highcharts.

After a rapid increase in global emissions of around 3% per year between 2000 and 2013, emissions only grew by 0.4% per year between 2013 and 2016. This was reversed over the last two years, with emissions growing by 1.6% in 2017 and expected to grow in 2018 by 2.7% (with an uncertainty range of between 1.8% and 3.7%).

Increases in 2018 driven largely by China

Much of the slowdown in the growth of global emissions from fossil fuels between 2014 and 2016 had been driven by a combination of reductions in the US and China, as well as relatively little growth in emissions in other countries.

However, in 2017 Chinese emissions grew, while declines in the US slowed. In 2018 China is expected to show substantial increases in emissions, with increases  also expected in the US.

India’s emissions increased a bit more quickly in 2018 than over the past few years, while the EU’s emissions have remained relatively flat since 2014 and did not noticeably change in 2017 or 2018. The growth in emissions from the rest of the world has remained at around 0.25GtCO2 per year for the past three years.

The total emissions for each year between 2015 and 2018, and the countries that were responsible for the change in emissions, are shown in the figure below. Annual emissions for 2015, 2016, 2017 and estimates for 2018 are shown by the black bars. The coloured bars show the change in emissions between each set of years, broken down by country. Negative values show reductions in emissions, while positive values reflect emission increases.

Annual global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels (black bars) and drivers of changes between years by country (coloured bars). Negative values indicate reductions in emissions. Note that the y-axis does not start at zero. Data from the Global Carbon Project; chart by Carbon Brief using Highcharts.

As 2018 is not yet over – and somewhat limited data is available – these projections are still subject to large uncertainties. The GCP will publish more complete 2018 numbers in early 2019 when all the data is available. However, it is clear that the rise in emissions from fossil fuels in 2018 will be the largest in quite some time.

China

China alone was responsible for just under half the global increase in CO2 emissions in 2018. Chinese emissions are projected to grow by 4.7% in 2018, with a wide uncertainty range from 2% to 7.4%.

Prof Corinne Le Quéré, director of the Tyndall Centre at the University of East Anglia and one of the lead scientists at the Global Carbon Project, tells Carbon Brief (video above) that the rise in Chinese emissions in 2018 was primarily driven by “government stimulus in the construction industry”, a sector which “emits lots of CO2”.

Le Quéré suggests that some of this projected increase is “probably temporary”, but also cautions that it is difficult to say what will happen to Chinese emissions in 2019. Early indications suggest the government is planning another multi-trillion stimulus next year.

US

The GCP projects that US CO2 emissions are likely to increase in 2018 by around 2.5% – with an uncertainty ranging from 0.5% to 4.5%. This represents a reversal after three years of consecutive emission declines.

Le Quéré points out that a large portion of the increase in US emissions was “associated with a cold winter followed by a hot summer, both of which use a lot of energy”. Power sector emissions continued to decline, with US coal consumption expected to reach a new low in 2018. However, these are somewhat offset by increases in industrial and transportation emissions driven by a growing economy.

Despite record sales of electric vehicle in the US – the total number just hit the 1m mark – there are nearly 12m more cars with internal combustion engines in the country than there were in 2008.

The GCP forecasts that US emissions will probably begin to decline again in 2019, as cheap gas, wind and solar continue to displace coal and temporary weather effects end.

European Union

EU emissions are expected to decrease by 0.7% in 2018 – with a range of -2.6% to 1.3%. While power sector emissions have continued to decrease, overall emission declines are more modest because increased use of petrol for transportation is offsetting decreased use of coal and gas for electricity generation.

After this modest decline in 2018, EU emissions would have returned to much the same level as in 2014. There have been no significant changes in EU CO2 output since then.

India and the rest of the world

India and other developing countries saw emission increases in 2018, due to economic growth that is “not yet decoupled” from greenhouse gas emissions, the GCP says.

India’s emissions are expected to increase by 6.3% in 2018 – with a range of 4.3% to 8.3% – and the rest of the world’s emissions are expected to increase by 1.8% – with a range of 0.5% to 3.0%.

Decarbonising, but too slowly

The increase in CO2 emissions from fossil fuels in 2018 leaves the world far from the trajectory needed to meet global climate goals. Yet the GCP report does contain a few proverbial silver linings. It points out that 19 countries representing 20% of the global total have significantly reduced CO2 emissions over the last decade.

As Le Quéré tells Carbon Brief, “we are in a very different situation than we were in just five years ago”. This is due to very large declines in coal use in the US and Europe and the rapid rise of cheap renewable energy.

Even China, which led the world in CO2 emissions increases in 2018, has much slower growth of coal use than a decade ago. There are some suggestions that global coal use may have peaked, though it is too soon to know for sure.

On the other hand, global oil and gas use is growing unabated. In particular, the world has been slow in addressing emissions from the transportation sector, as electric and other alternative-fuel vehicles have been slow in taking off. Le Quéré suggests that focusing on transport, buildings and industry will be critical for ensuring future emissions reductions.

Ultimately, while progress is being made on decarbonisation, it is happening at a slower rate than the global economy is growing, particularly in developing countries. As the GCP argues:

“Insufficient emission reductions in developed countries and a need for increased energy use in developing countries where per capita emissions remain far below those of wealthier nations will continue to put upward pressure on CO2 emissions. Peak emissions will occur only when total fossil CO2 emissions finally start to decline despite growth in global energy consumption, with fossil energy production replaced by rapidly growing low- or no-carbon technologies.”

The global carbon budget

Every year the GCP provides an estimate of the global carbon budget. It estimates both the release and uptake of carbon including emissions from fossil fuels and industry, emissions from land-use changes, carbon taken up by the oceans and land, and changes in atmospheric concentrations of CO2. This differs from the commonly used term “carbon budget”, referring to how much emissions are left to meet a climate target, such as avoiding 1.5 or 2C of warming.

The most recent budget, including estimated values for 2018, is shown in the figure below. Values above zero represent sources of CO2 – from fossil fuels and land use – while values below zero represent “carbon sinks” that remove CO2 from the atmosphere. CO2 emissions either accumulate in the atmosphere, or are absorbed by the oceans or land vegetation.

Annual global carbon budget of sources and sinks from 1959-2018. Note that the budget does not fully balance every year due to remaining uncertainties, particularly in sinks. 2018 numbers are preliminary estimates. Data from the Global Carbon Project; chart by Carbon Brief using Highcharts.

Land-use changes, such as deforestation and fires, comprised 10.6% of total CO2 emissions in 2018, down a bit from 12.6% in 2017. The remaining 89% of emissions came from fossil fuels and industry. Total CO2 emissions increased by about 0.7% between 2017 and 2018, driven by higher fossil-fuel emissions but lower land-use emissions.

According to the GCP estimates, about 43% of CO2 emitted in 2018 accumulated in the atmosphere. The remainder was taken up by carbon sinks – 35% by the land and 23% by the ocean. Land uptake was unusually high in 2018 and one of the highest levels in the past few decades, though the cause of this is currently unclear, the authors tell Carbon Brief.

Atmospheric CO2 concentration are projected to increase by 2.2 parts per million (ppm), reaching 407ppm in 2018. This increase is close to the average increase over the past decade, despite record-high emissions. This is because the return to El Niño neutral conditions and an unusally large land sink.

Updating sources and sinks

The GCP’s new global carbon budget also includes updated estimates of sources and sinks based on changes in inventories and new research published since the last budget came out. The figure below, taken from the paper presenting the latest budget, shows the values used for every year from 2006 through to present.

Multiple line graphs showing Global Carbon Project source and sink estimates in billions of tonnes of carbon (GtC) – note, not CO2 – for every Global Carbon Budget published between 2006 and 2018. Figure B4 from Le Quéré et al (2018).

Global Carbon Project source and sink estimates in billions of tonnes of carbon (GtC) – note, not CO2 – for every Global Carbon Budget published between 2006 and 2018. Figure B4 from Le Quéré et al (2018).

Estimates of global fossil fuel and industry emissions were revised downwards by around 1.5% in recent years in the 2018 report compared to 2017, with larger declines of around 4% in Chinese emissions. This is due to a revision in the emission factors use for cement production and is particularly pronounced in China as they produce around 60% of the world’s cement.

Implications for meeting Paris Agreement targets

As previously discussed by Carbon Brief, there is a growing gap between emission reduction commitments made by countries to-date and what would be required to meet the Paris Agreement targets of limiting warming to 1.5C, or well below 2C above pre-industrial levels. Every year that emissions continue to increase makes this gap larger.

The figure below shows historical fossil fuel CO2 emissions in black, with 2018 emissions as a red dot. The various coloured lines show the well-below 2C scenarios (blue) and 1.5C scenarios (purple) produced by integrated assessment models in shared socioeconomic pathway number one. The thicker blue and purple lines represent the chosen “reference scenario” for each mitigation target.

Line graph showing Historical fossil-fuel emissions (black), 2018 emissions (red), well-below 2C scenarios (RCP2.6 – blue) and below 1.5C scenarios (RCP1.9 – purple). Mitigation scenarios from integrated assessment models using shared socioeconomic pathway number one. Bold lines indicate the subset of scenarios chosen as a focus for running CMIP6 climate model simulations. Source: Figure 2 in the Jackson et al 2018

Historical fossil-fuel emissions (black), 2018 emissions (red), well-below 2C scenarios (RCP2.6 – blue) and below 1.5C scenarios (RCP1.9 – purple). Mitigation scenarios from integrated assessment models using shared socioeconomic pathway number one. Bold lines indicate the subset of scenarios chosen as a focus for running CMIP6 climate model simulations. Source: Figure 2 in the Jackson et al 2018

The increase in emissions in 2018 makes it more challenging for the world to meet its Paris Agreement goals. If emissions continue to increase over the next few years, the more ambitious mitigation targets – such as limiting warming to below 1.5C – may quickly move out of reach, at least in the absence of removal of CO2 from the atmosphere from planetary-scale deployments of as-yet-unproven negative emission technologies late in the century.

As Dr Glen Peters, a senior researcher Center for International Climate and Environmental Research (CICERO) in Oslo, says in a statement:

“The rise in emissions in 2017 could be seen as a one-off, but the growth rate in 2018 is even higher, and it is becoming crystal clear the world is so far failing in its duty to steer onto a course consistent with the goals set out in the Paris Agreement in 2015.”

Carbon Brief



37 Comments on "Analysis: Fossil-fuel Emissions in 2018 Increasing at Fastest Rate for Seven Years"

  1. CAM on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 7:22 am 

    This should not be a surprise to anyone who has followed the use of fossil fuels and understands how critical they are to the capitalist system. Some have been distracted by the fantasy of “Peak Demand”. We now have an existential crisis on our hands, with no good way out. Big changes are a coming!!

  2. Antius on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 7:23 am 

    Why Britain is as dystopian as China.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-12-05/china-really-more-dystopian-uk

  3. Uncle Bill on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 8:02 am 

    Does Obama promise to stop the seas from rising still in the pipeline!?
    Yep, it is…called a hopeim pipe…take a big drag and inhale….but don’t exhale

  4. I AM THE MOB on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 8:14 am 

    U.S. trade deficit climbs to 10-year high as American snap up imports while China boycotts soybeans

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/us-trade-deficit-climbs-to-10-year-high-despite-tariffs-tough-trump-stance-2018-12-06

    So much for winning the trade war..Trump is an imbecile..

  5. Эй, братья, пожалуйста, ударьте антиамериканскую собаку, которую я сделал из гранитного форума on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 8:23 am 

    good news supertards sending a ship to the black sea and putin backed down,allowing ukrainian ships to pass

  6. Davy on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 8:30 am 

    Do you people realize just how much I need this pussy serviced- you know, like yesterday.

    Up the butt and through the penis.

    Whether it be a very brief cornholing or a brisk corn-husking, it matters not to me just so long as I get my pussy serviced.

  7. Bom Singh on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 11:06 am 

    Give it time. Peak oil only happened in 2005, a mere 13 years ago. Give it another 30 or 40 years and even China will have to begin cutting back.

  8. This is JuanP on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 11:34 am 

    Davy on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 8:30 am
    Do you people realize just how much I need this pussy serviced- you know, like yesterday. Up the butt and through the penis. Whether it be a very brief cornholing or a brisk corn-husking, it matters not to me just so long as I get my pussy serviced.

  9. Antius on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 12:24 pm 

    Ultra-low-pressure compressed air energy storage?

    This paper reviews the cost of drilling geothermal wells as a function of depth. The conclusion? The cost of drilling is roughly proportional to the square of depth.

    http://pubs.geothermal-library.org/lib/grc/1030220.pdf

    The same is ultimately true for digging any hole in the ground, as it becomes more and more difficult to reinforce the walls of the excavated hole and remove any excavated material, as the hole deepens.

    With CAES, the energy stored within a volume of compressed air is equal to P1V1 x ln(P1/P2). Increase the storage pressure from 1 bar to 2 bar and energy stored per unit volume increases by a factor of 3. However, doubling pressure implies doubling depth, which increases excavation cost by a factor of ~4.

    This suggests that in terms of minimising capital cost, low pressure CAES may be a better storage option than high pressure CAES. In principal, if compressed air were stored at a pressure of 0.5bar, then only 2-3m of overlay would be needed over a compressed air store to counterbalance internal pressure. We could excavate a hole to a depth of 3m using ordinary earth moving equipment. The pit could be lined with polyethylene, filled with concrete roof supports, and the excavated material simply pushed back on top.

    To store enough energy for a small town of 1000 homes for 1 day (12MWh at European consumption levels) would require quite a lot of excavation. Each cubic metre of storage volume would contain a maximum of 60KJ of energy. So to store enough compressed air for the town, the excavated pit would need an area of 0.24km2 (24 hectares), assuming a depth of 3m.

    At such low pressures, compression and expansion would be isothermal, so storage efficiency would be close to 100%. We could even build wind turbines that generated the compressed air directly, feeding the store, with electricity produced by running air from the store through a single turbo-generator.

    Ultra-low-pressure CAES is something that would work on a very small scale. It is simple enough that a hobbyist could engineer the system for home energy storage, provided that he had sufficient space. To store a day of electricity at European household consumption levels would require a store covering 240m2, or a square 15.5m aside.

  10. claes on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 6:21 pm 

    Antius, The Norvegians are trying hard to dispose of CO2 by pumping down CO2-gas down in to former oilwells, without getting any energy in return.
    You are pumping down gas into the ground, and getting a lot energy out of it.
    You and the norvegians are doing the same thing,but in norway it costs money , in your case it’s good business.
    This sounds like a lot of money ,if you could combine the two methods.

  11. Free Speech Message Board on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 9:26 pm 

    When the shit hits the fan, some say the US will have a Civil War between the Nazis and the Commies or a race war, but one hopes that the 99% wakes up instead and unites against the elites who are the real enemy.

  12. claes on Thu, 6th Dec 2018 9:34 pm 

    freespeech, you gonna lose that war

  13. Cloggie on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 1:59 am 

    freespeech, you gonna lose that war

    Foreigners decided the outcome of the American revolution, that time against the British. Without foreigners, Americans would have lost.

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2014/11/25/the-second-american-revolution/

    Don’t rule out foreigners, they could act again, because everybody and his mother wants to see the US deep state defeated, the largest threat against the survival of humanity.

    Voltaire about neocons:

    ”They are, all of them, born with raging fanaticism in their hearts, just as the Bretons and the Germans are born with blond hair. I would not be in the least bit surprised if these people would not some day become deadly to the human race.’

    https://www.nytimes.com/1990/09/30/books/l-voltaire-and-the-jews-590990.html

    All leaders around the world know about their power…

    https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/books/167289/nanjing-jewish-studies

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pDtgWUtdUM

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/oct/02/malaysian-prime-minister-mahathir-mohamad-calls-jews-hook-nosed

    It won’t be long until European America’s hand will be forced between doing nothing and wake up in the next USSR-of-color or revolt. The insurgents can expect all the help they can use from abroad and in the end foreign troops to finish off the 2nd American Revolution and break the country up. That will be the drama of the twenties, probably shortly after Trump.

    Your choice.

  14. Antius on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 3:44 am 

    One for Cloggie. Some interesting articles on the Bordeaux ground-level tramway electrification system.

    https://onlinepubs.trb.org/Onlinepubs/circulars/ec058/15_02_Swanson.pdf

    http://www.agencias.pr.gov/agencias/jca/Documents/Documentos%20Ambientales/2007/Preliminar/Tranvía%20de%20Carolina%20Carolina%20-%20JCA-07-0022/App%20B-B1%20BORDEA1.pdf

    This is basically a third rail electrification system in which power is supplied only to short sections of track at any particular time, by switches that detect the presence of the vehicle. This eliminates the danger of accidental electrocution to pedestrians. The vehicle carries a transmitter that activates the switch.

    Something similar could be used for roadway electrification for electric cars. In the past, we have discussed Swedish attempts at developing electrified roads, allowing vehicles to be powered directly from the grid. However, the Swedish arrangement is cumbersome, requiring a long and fragile contact that reaches into a slot within the road. The slot is likely to fill with debris and the contacts are very likely to suffer damage.

    An alternative arrangement would be a simple DC monopole system, in which an electrified steel rail is embedded within an insulated sleeve within the road, with the top few centimetres of steel protruding above the surface of the road. A simple sliding shoe type contact would contact the top of the rail. The return phase would be through the tyres of the vehicle. The road surface either side of the rail would be embedded with long steel studs, which earth into the ground. Switching could be accomplished by permanent magnets mounted on the underside of vehicles, which activate reed switches within the road, switching on power through breaker boxes along the side of the road.

    Such a system would appear to be quite robust, as power transfer occurs through a solid steel strip, which is not vulnerable to debris accumulation as it rises above the road surface. Power can be part supplied by Solar PV modules, mounted along the sides of the road, with cells series mounted to achieve the required output voltage. Given that cruising power for a vehicle is roughly proportional to speed, the road can partially adapt to intermittent power supply by varying speed limits. At low power levels, speed limits could be set at 80kmh, whereas at high power levels, speed limits could be increased to 120kmh. This allows power consumption to be cut by 30% during solar/wind lulls.

  15. The Truth Shall Set You Free on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 3:58 am 

    This explains a lot, including behaviors exhibited by a few regular posters.

    Have you ever wondered what explains the cult like reverence of “Davy”, “Antius”, “Cloggie” and most members of the Republican party for Dear Leader Trump? We now have a working hypothesis. Researchers from Columbia and New York University examined voting patterns by geographic area with internet search term frequency. The study results pointed to a strong positive correlation between support for Trump and particular internet search topics. The results were shocking, although logical.

    Trump’s base support comes from older White males who suffer from Fragile (Toxic) Masculinity Syndrome.

    The following internet search terms had the strongest positive correlation with support for Trump:

    • “How to get girls”;
    • “Penis enlargement”;
    • “Penis size”;
    • “Errectile Dysfunction”;
    • “Hair Loss”;
    • “Steriods”; “
    • Testosterone”;
    • “Viagra”.

    Trump ditto-heads lack these traits- traits they perceive define masculinity. Therefore, they are innately attracted to a leader who projects these traits.

    Examples of Trump’s alpha masculinity as perceived by Trump ditto-heads:

    • Trump uses a combination of a hair piece and he has had hair transplantation surgery (pubic hair was transplanted onto his scalp) because he’s too proud to admit he’s bald.
    • Trump’s bullying behavior is perceived by his supporters to be a manly man.
    • Frequent golfer.
    • He eats McDonalds almost every day.
    • He’s a billionaire with a hot wife who married him for his money.

  16. Antius on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 4:24 am 

    “The Truth Shall Set You Free”

    Correlation is not causation. Trump is popular amongst older white males, because his policies are aimed at preventing the further collapse of the white western world, which they are old and wise enough to know is not a good thing for them or their offspring. These people have been around for a while and tend to think about long term outcomes. They are not interested in trendy left-wing idealism, social justice or immigrant rights, because they have seen it all before, have seen what it has done to the world around them and know that it is not a good thing. They vote for Trump for what he promises to do. I doubt that very many of them are interested in his hair, his penis or his aptitude at playing golf. They would vote for a woman who promised all the same things. His masculine persona may help him connect with them at some level, but it is not what lends him their support. In France, Marine Le Pen gets plenty of votes from crusty old Frenchmen. Do you think it is her ‘masculine persona’?

  17. The Truth Shall Set You Free on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 5:35 am 

    A message of thanks to “Anti-US” and “Davy” for their enlightening feedback. It’s reassuring to note anecdotal acceptance of the Fragile (Toxic) Masculinity Syndrome hypothesis by Trump ditto-heads, “Davy” and “Anti-US”.

  18. The Truth Shall Set You Free on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 5:53 am 

    Anti-US

    I’ve been waiting for this.

    “They would vote for a woman who promised all the same things. His masculine persona may help him connect with them at some level, but it is not what lends him their support.”

    Your statement was examined in the study and your opinion is DEAD wrong. The fact of the matter is 68% of Trump supporters WOULD NOT support a woman for president.

    IOW, stop talking out of your ass. You are making statements without any knowledge of facts.

  19. This is JuanP on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 6:06 am 

    The Truth Shall Set You Free on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 5:53 am Anti-US I’ve been waiting for this. “They would vote for a woman who promised all the same things. His masculine persona may help him connect with them at some level, but it is not what lends him their support.” Your statement was examined in the study and your opinion is DEAD wrong. The fact of the matter is 68% of Trump supporters WOULD NOT support a woman for president. IOW, stop talking out of your ass. You are making statements without any knowledge of facts.

  20. Davy on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 7:16 am 

    “China’s unbridled export of coal power imperils climate goals”
    https://tinyurl.com/y9d9933d

    “Even as China struggles to curb domestic coal-fired power and the deadly pollution it produces, the world’s top carbon emitter is aggressively exporting the same troubled technology to Asia, Africa and the Middle East, an investigation by AFP has shown. The carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from these Chinese-backed plants could cripple global efforts to rein in global warming caused by the burning of fossil fuels — especially coal, analysts warn. “China is a world leader in terms of embracing the policy and investment needs to progressively decarbonise its economy,” said Tim Buckley, director of energy finance studies at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA). “But internationally, China continues to invest in a range of coal project in direct contradiction to its domestic energy strategy.”

  21. rockman on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 10:47 am 

    CAM – Exactly. What a bizarre statement: ” increase in overall human-caused CO2 emissions may be smaller than the increase from fossil fuels and industry…” Maybe I missed the alien invasion but as far as I know all fossil fuel and industrial produced CO2 emissions have been caused by humans. Consumers directly produce huge amounts of CO2 and industrial activity is conducted for the direct benefit of those same consumers.

    Bom – Assuming that China will be producing less CO2 decades down the road may not be correct. When the world has long passed global peak oil the majority of CO2 will be produced by those economies can afford to acquire the bulk of the remaining fossil fuel. Obviously history proves that future fossil fuel consumption WILL NOT be spread equally across the global population.

  22. Эй, братья, пожалуйста, ударьте антиамериканскую собаку, которую я сделал из гранитного форума on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 10:58 am 

    anti-US the tard said society should go back to methodology of virgin bribes. he also said we should build giant and long azs pneumatic tubes for transportation of cheap chinese goods. shows you how much of a tard devoid of any reality he is. he failed to attribute the idea to supertard g. orwell

  23. Antius on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 11:30 am 

    “he also said we should build giant and long azs pneumatic tubes for transportation of cheap chinese goods. shows you how much of a tard devoid of any reality he is. he failed to attribute the idea to supertard g. orwell”

    Hydraulic, not pneumatic tubes. I wanted to explore the concept and I reported here what I learned. The example of hydraulic capsule transport of goods from Shanghai to Paris; was to demonstrate that the concept can be used to transport goods at very low energy cost over long distances; not to advocate that we do continue to buy everything from China. Essentially, this is a modern version of canal boat transportation, without the need for drivers or boat propulsion.

    Maybe you are correct and this is not a viable idea. The concept has some downsides that could prove to be its undoing. It is slow – no more than 10mph. The pipelines would have significant capital cost. To achieve low energy cost and low transport cost generally; the pipelines must be heavily loaded – essentially a continuous line of goods.

  24. Cloggie on Fri, 7th Dec 2018 1:14 pm 

    Hamburg is going to experiment with such an infrastructure, a test tube if you will:

    https://worldmaritimenews.com/archives/266074/moving-containers-at-high-speed-through-a-tube-could-become-a-reality-at-hamburg-port/

  25. Davy on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 5:11 am 

    “US Coal Consumption To Hit Rock Bottom, Lowest Level In 39 Years”
    https://tinyurl.com/ya3pbotl

    “The Energy Information Administration published a short ‘Today in Energy’ update on Tuesday highlighting its expectations for the US coal industry in 2018, revealing that total US coal consumption for 2018 is expected to fall to around the 691 MMst mark — a 4% decline on 2017 levels, 437 MMst (44%) down on 2007, and the lowest level since 1979. The decline in US coal use is due primarily to changes in the country’s electric power sector, the nation’s largest consumer of coal. The US power sector accounted for 93% of total US coal consumption between 2007 and 2018 and, as such, the decline in coal consumption is due primarily to changes in the power sector, which has increased the pace of coal-fired power plant retirements and decreased capacity factors, or utilization, of coal plants as a result of increasing competition from natural gas and renewable energy. Just how much coal has been retired in the United States of late? In 2007, coal-fired capacity in the United States totaled 313 gigawatts (GW) spread over 1,470 generators. At the end of 2017, the US power sector had retired 55 GW across 529 generators — and in the first nine months of 2018 alone, 11 GW was retired, and another 3 GW is expected to be retired by the time the year comes to a close (and a further 4 GW expected to be retired by the end of 2019).”

  26. The Nationalist on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 6:35 am 

    I blame the Russians, no wait…

  27. The Truth Shall Set You Free on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 6:37 am 

    All the yellow vests are just nasty whitey racists who have no right to complain about anything. They invaded Europe and displaced the mudslimes in the 16th century anyway!!
    No wait…
    I am going to go and cry in the corner and read Hillary’s autobiography
    sob sob sob

  28. Cloggie on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 6:43 am 

    I think England and Wales did a wonderful thing in having a referundum to leave the E.U.
    Sticking their collective fingers up at the fat land whale commie bitch Smerkel takes some doing!.
    Meanwhile here in Holland are too small to do such things sadly and we will do as we are told HEIL SMERKEL!, HEIL SMERKEL!.

  29. The Nationalist on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 6:48 am 

    This guys is hillarious, impersonating all you poofters!
    I’ll bet he is really good looking too with a massive library and cultural education to boot!!
    Meanwhile here is Australia our emissions rise and the school kids are protesting climate change as they are somewhat concerned for the survival of the natural world (as mentioned by Sir David Attenbourough recently).
    I predict the usual negative responses below, (without any humour too i’ll bet).

    Yours Sincerely,
    The Nationalist
    TOOTLE PIP!

  30. This is likely JuanP on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 7:04 am 

    Cloggie on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 6:43 am

    I think England and Wales did a wonderful thing in having a referundum to leave the E.U.
    Sticking their collective fingers up at the fat land whale commie bitch Smerkel takes some doing!.
    Meanwhile here in Holland are too small to do such things sadly and we will do as we are told HEIL SMERKEL!, HEIL SMERKEL!.

  31. Cloggie on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 7:12 am 

    “I think England and Wales did a wonderful thing in having a referundum to leave the E.U.
    Sticking their collective fingers up at the fat land whale commie bitch Smerkel takes some doing!.
    Meanwhile here in Holland are too small to do such things sadly and we will do as we are told HEIL SMERKEL!, HEIL SMERKEL!.”

    Mobster, Brexit means that the US loses an important means of control over continental Europe. Merkel btw is the greatest US deep state lap dog you can imagine. Watch France though. They will team up with Russia before you can say “Hitler”.

    http://en.kremlin.ru/events/president/news/59317

    Mazzeltov!

  32. Davy on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 7:23 am 

    “Mobster, Brexit means that the US loses an important means of control over continental Europe. Merkel btw is the greatest US deep state lap dog you can imagine. Watch France though. They will team up with Russia before you can say “Hitler”.”

    neder, dirty juan wants you to believe it is MOB and you are falling for it.

  33. Cloggie on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 7:28 am 

    “neder, dirty juan wants you to believe it is MOB and you are falling for it.”

    You have an obsession with Juan, who would never write “Heil Smerkel”

    Most if not all of the identity theft is done by Mobster, not Juan, who merely stalks you under his own nick.

  34. Davy on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 7:41 am 

    Sure dirty juan would neder. He is loving his new role as board clown with deception and ridiculous noise. Dirty Juan has gone off into the delusional likely because of drugs (cocaine) and mental illness. We have his documented admission to his depression and this is likely of the bipolar kind now that we see this behavior. The reason it is not MOB is MOB is too vain and outspoken. He loves to see his handle on the board.

    “Most if not all of the identity theft is done by Mobster, not Juan, who merely stalks you under his own nick.”

    The reason you are saying this is dirty juan kissed your ass a few times and you now love him for it. I have outed him multiple times and we have his admissions of it. You are so far up your ass with what you want to see and hear sometimes I wonder about your state of mind.

  35. The Truth Shall Set You Free on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 8:06 am 

    The Nationalist has penned far more insight into the real identity than all the rest of you clown combined.

    In due time, the real identity will be revealed.

    Congratulations.

  36. This is JuanP on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 8:31 am 

    The Truth Shall Set You Free on Sat, 8th Dec 2018 8:06 am
    The Nationalist has penned far more insight into the real identity than all the rest of you clown combined. In due time, the real identity will be revealed. Congratulations.

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