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Page added on April 22, 2019

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What Oil Shortage? Just a Case of Supply Being Redistributed

Consumption

Last April, Iran exported about 2.5 million barrels of oil per day (mbpd) before President Donald Trump decided to withdraw from the nuclear deal with Tehran.

Sanctions were then placed on Iran, but following great opposition from Iran’s key customers, namely China and India, the U.S. granted “waivers” to allow some exports of Iranian crude.

By this March, Iranian exports had already fallen to about 1 mbpd. The deadline for the waivers was May, 2018. This morning — April 22 — the U.S. declared it would not grant an extension of those waivers.

If the U.S. forges ahead and China and India both comply, it could potentially take about 700,000 to 1 million bpd of oil out of the market!

Brent Oil rose nearly $2.5/bbl. Monday morning on this news, with world markets rattled on the risk of an oil shortage given importance of Iran’s role. Meanwhile the U.S., Saudi Arabia and UAE have promised to ramp up production to make up for any shortfall.

Let’s reassess the situation. In December last year, OPEC/OPEC+ agreed to take about 1.2-1.5 mbpd of oil out of the market given the price collapse and glut in the market.

The main responsibility of the cuts was to fall on Saudi Arabia and Russia. Russia still has not met its quota and undercut so far. Saudi Arabia has cut much more than its quota and is mostly responsible for the majority of the cuts.

However, if Iran were to lose, say, 1 mbpd of oil, this amount can easily be met by Saudi Arabia. So, there is not shortage per se, it is just a matter of a redistributing who would be “allowed” to sell their oil.

If traders remember not too long ago, Trump accused OPEC (by default Saudi Arabia) of taking too much oil out of the market as Brent threatened $70/bbl. Going into re-election, Trump cannot afford to have angry voters staring at higher gasoline prices at the pump.

Similarly, Saudi Arabia could not pump more, even if they wanted to. The Saudis were losing out given higher prices, and they feared collapsing the oil price. Let’s not forget the U.S. shale breakeven price is about $45-50/bbl., but Saudi Arabia’s is closer to $75/bbl.+.

How else to appease their ally, keep the oil market balanced, and put pressure on their biggest nemesis, Iran? Seems like a zero-sum game.

Needless to say, there is no shortage of oil. Also, there is nothing to guarantee that all 1 mbpd of Iranian exports go to zero! Why? Well, three of the eight countries granted the 180-day waivers back in November — Greece, Italy, and Taiwan — have already reduced their imports to zero. And South Korea and Japan also are not as dependent on Iranian oil as they have found options.

That leaves China, India, and Turkey. We all know where these three countries fit on the U.S. foreign policy spectrum. China has been extremely vocal about the U.S. stepping outside of its jurisdiction to impose these sanctions in the first place. Anyone remember the trade talks that have been “progressing very well” and “close to reaching an agreement?” It is good to know the market is priced to perfection assuming all is hunky dory with U.S. and China as besties.

To summarize, we are exiting the peak winter heating oil season, when typically demand for crude drops in May just before gasoline season starts in June. Assuming worst-case scenario if Iran were to lose all 1 million bpd of oil, that shortfall can easily be met by the remaining members of OPEC+.

These waivers could potentially be in place for another year before being cancelled altogether. All in all, the oil market and its very temperamental traders have gotten a bit ahead of themselves.

The price of oil is more than fairly valued. If Iran were to close the strait of Hormuz, it could potentially cause a geopolitical crisis. One thing is certain: Equities in general are priced for perfection with no risks priced in, whether it is oil prices being toppy or demand falling off given the geopolitical and economic implications.

If there is any delay in U.S./Chinese trade deal, it goes without saying the S&P 500 could easily test its December lows.

realmoney



96 Comments on "What Oil Shortage? Just a Case of Supply Being Redistributed"

  1. Robert Inget on Mon, 22nd Apr 2019 9:45 pm 

    When product is unavailable at ANY price,
    that’s SHORTAGE.

    Your local ‘gas’ station’s delivery tanker fails to show for one or more reasons. You can offer $100
    a gallon to the manager.He or she would love to sell you gasoline. (but not from empty shelves)

    There may well be a shale, ultra light, crude oil ‘glut’ at this time in the US. If we need heavy
    Canadian or Venezuelan crude to make diesel
    what help is condensate?

  2. makati1 on Mon, 22nd Apr 2019 10:28 pm 

    Robert, you understand oil. Many here just parrot the “news”. Much of the “oil” the US produces is almost useless without other oil to blend into a usable product. That ‘other’ needs to be imported. Without it (imports), the US would not be ‘oil independent’. US oil independence is a huge lie.

  3. Chrome Mags on Mon, 22nd Apr 2019 10:36 pm 

    It’s far more important to squelch on a deal than having ample oil supply. Once we reach the point in which we have the integrity to stand by our ageements then all will be lost. Imagine if we had needed to stand by our many agreements with native Americans. They would have ended with land with actual value and good, growing soil.

  4. forbin on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 3:53 am 

    ” Needless to say, there is no shortage of oil.”

    never believe anything until it’s officially denied ….

    Forbin

  5. Davy on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 3:54 am 

    ”Needless to say, there is no shortage of oil.”

    There is a shortage of real money and brains.

  6. Antius on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 7:32 am 

    There is of course the issue that producing oil from fractured shale (tight oil) is only profitable at a price that consumers cannot afford to pay. The initially endless flow of investor money is starting to dry up as investors get itchy about negative free cash flow of these companies.

    https://srsroccoreport.com/shale-stock-losses-99-of-its-value-investor-warning-for-the-future-of-the-industry/

    The same is true in OPEC countries; the prices that consumers can afford to pay are beneath the price that producers need to remain profitable. Gail Tverberg wrote an excellent piece detailing the role that declining oil revenues played in the Venezuelan collapse.

    An intelligent way of framing the peak oil question is not how many barrels do we have remaining; but how many barrels remains that can be produced with profit at say $30/barrel? We use this stuff as an energy source for transport. The economy has a baseline energy intensity per unit of GDP. This ultimately sets a ceiling on what is affordable and explains why much of the world’s identified oil resources will never be produced.

    There are in theory infinite reserves of oil available at prices exceeding $200/barrel, as we can manufacture the stuff from water and limestone using thermal energy provided from the sun. The technology is old and could be developed quickly. It is of absolutely no use to anyone, as it cannot produce liquid fuels at a price that consumers can afford.

  7. Robert Inget on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 8:32 am 

    Are we prepared for WW/3 ?

    DEBKA on Iran sanctions. (an Israeli mouthpiece)

    US financial pressure on Iran is so deep that even if China, Russia, Turkey, Indonesia, Malaysia and some West European countries try to bypass or defy the Trump administration by buying Iranian oil, regardless of sanctions, the quantities will be too negligible to affect the overall calamity.

    It has placed the Islamic Republic of Iran face to face with two options: to knuckle under to US demands, or resort to military measures to force Washington to ease the grip on its windpipe. Tehran has often warned that if its oil exports are choked off, the Arab oil nations of the Gulf will be equally prevented from sending their product to market, either by a partial or total blockage of the Strait of Hormuz, through which one-fifth of the world’s daily consumption of fuel passes, or disruption of the oil tanker routes through the Red Sea.

    DEBKAfile’s military sources report that Iran lacks sufficient military strength to totally blockade Hormuz or the Red Sea oil routes. However, a single attack on tanker traffic would send oil prices shooting skyward past $100 the barrel, creating market pressure on Washington. Other offensive options for Tehran would be attacks on US military bases in the Middle East, including Syria and Iraq, the Gulf and the Red Sea. Local Shiite militias or Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) special units would be activated to strike targets belonging to US allies, including Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

    With his mind focused on belligerency, Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Sunday, April 21, replaced the veteran IRGC chief, Gen. Ali Jafari, with a younger, more radical and dynamic figure, deputy Guards chief Brig. Gen, Hossein Salami. According to our sources, Salami, who stands out even among the radical IRGC officers as a hawk, was selected by the supreme leader to prepare a military campaign against the United States and its allies in the region for the purpose of breaking the back of American sanctions. He is being closely watched not just in Washington, but also in Riyadh and Jerusalem.

    (not the full article)

  8. Cloggie on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 8:34 am 

    Antius says: “There are in theory infinite reserves of oil available at prices exceeding $200/barrel, as we can manufacture the stuff from water and limestone using thermal energy provided from the sun. The technology is old and could be developed quickly. It is of absolutely no use to anyone, as it cannot produce liquid fuels at a price that consumers can afford.”

    Price 14k.

    Of course many can afford 200, just dump the merc or beamer:

    “1. Mitsubishi Mirage. The cheapest car of 2019 is also the most fuel efficient. Even with relatively recent updates, the Mitsubishi Mirage maintains its 36 miles per gallon city, 43 highway, and 39 combined rating, beating the next-best Chevy Cruze Diesel by a modest two MPG overall.21 ”

  9. Robert Inget on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 8:42 am 

    Will diesel become unaffordable?
    Who knew reinstating sanctions would lead us here?

    RUETERS;
    Traders have reached a very different judgment about the outlook for oil supplies, inventories and prices in the second half of 2019 to advisers at the State Department or in Saudi Arabia and its allies.

    Oil traders appear skeptical Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates will offset the reduction in Iran’s exports fully without a further increase in prices first, notwithstanding understandings with the White House.”

    https://www.reuters.com/article/oil-prices-kemp/column-oil-traders-to-saudi-arabia-show-us-the-barrels-kemp-idUSL5N22538O

  10. Cloggie on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 9:42 am 

    Antius, I really must urge you to invest 30 minutes of your life in googling “cost UCG” to abandon the idea-fixe of “€200-oil” and other garbage this female accountant put into your head. Britain is sitting on trillions of tons of coal and all the British need to do is snort up gasified coal just in case oil supplies would run dry, for instance as a result of US imposed sanction against some happless oil-producing country.

    The British government in its infinite wisdom has refused to let UCG tests proceed and give priority to renewable energy, in line with EU regulations. A BoJo-pm no doubt would overturn that decision.

    The bottleneck is climate, not fossil fuel supply or price.

  11. Robert Inget on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 9:56 am 

    from Twitter;

    “Saudi Arabia is now in a difficult position of having an alliance with Russia to reduce oil supplies and having an alliance with the U.S. to increase supplies”

    inget adds:
    “Verbal ‘alliances’ aren’t worth the paper they are
    written on”.
    If Saudis follow Trump and/or Putin, their regime collapses taking Fascist led Israel and Iran down with.

  12. Cloggie on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 10:35 am 

    Russia prevented Turkey, Qatar, KSA and the US to tear up Syria.

    If Turkey and Iran team up, Russia will not prevent them from tearing up KSA.

    Turkey and Iran already teamed up to prevent that Qatar would be “disciplined” by KSA over the former support of the Muslim Brotherhood, aimed st overthrowing of the KSA regime.

  13. Duncan Idaho on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 10:48 am 

    If Saudis follow Trump and/or Putin, their regime collapses taking Fascist led Israel and Iran down with

    Probably Israel–
    Iran? It will help Iran.

  14. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 2:07 pm 

    Because fertility rates are dropping around the world, it would make life much easier for people (who choose to stay single).

  15. Cloggie on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 2:08 pm 

    Because fertility rates are dropping around the world

    Only in the wrong places.

  16. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 2:15 pm 

    Cloggie, What do you mean by “only in the wrong places”?

  17. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 2:23 pm 

    There are a lot of people in the world who are discriminated against and persecuted simply because they don’t experience sexual attraction. They’re called asexuals.

  18. Cloggie on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 2:29 pm 

    Trump as a construction worker:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6_eu8fc4CQ

    “they are Italian… but they are good people”.

    LOL

  19. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 2:44 pm 

    All of the world’s oil and natural gas could be donated to countries that face fuel shortages.

  20. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 2:55 pm 

    To alleviate overpopulation, we could colonise Antarctica rather than Mars:
    1.Build urban-type settlements.
    2.Harness geothermal and wind power to provide electricity.
    3. Build roads.

  21. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 3:06 pm 

    Here’s a better idea: To cut costs, make all vehicles unmanned (including cargo ships, transport trucks, submarines etc.). It would save more lives and save money.

  22. Antius on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 3:53 pm 

    “Antius, I really must urge you to invest 30 minutes of your life in googling “cost UCG” to abandon the idea-fixe of “€200-oil” and other garbage this female accountant put into your head”

    I looked into underground coal gasification some 12 years ago on behalf of the BNP, who were looking for energy policy options that avoided the need for imports in a shtf scenario. Unfortunately, the original work is now gone, but I remember the general conclusions.

    There is some potential for UCG. The BNP at the time were not interested in climate change. Britain has substantial coal, but most of it is in deep seams that are capital intensive to develop, if one wishes to mine the coal as solid fuel. There are also large deposits under the north sea.

    The problem had more to do with poor economics. This stems from the fact that UCG needs to burn a solid fuel underground. A pilot well must be drilled and the coal seam shattered to allow passage of gases. Compressed oxygen is then injected at the seam depth and over-pressured in order to drive water out from around the pilot well. The seam is then ignited using a magnesium charge. Oxygen is pumped into the well and the pressure continues to force water away from the pilot well, vaporizing any residual water as the flame front advances. Super high temperature steam further reacts with coke in the hot zone, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

    Some problems:

    (1) The liberated gas is generally poor in quality, being a crude syngas consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, steam and SO2. In addition, there are minor quantities of coal tars, which could be refined into gasoline. The poor energy density of the gas, makes it relatively expensive to transport by pipeline, especially if it is located offshore. Producing liquid fuels requires further processing of syngas in a chemical reactor.

    (2) The poor porosity of the coal seam necessitates dense drilling around the pilot well to access the liberated gas. This is capital intensive and yields a product with limited value compared to natural gas or oil.

    (3) Gases tend to leak out from the combustion zone, raising significant environmental protection issues.

    (4) Much of the coal energy is lost as waste heat that is lost to the surrounding rock.

    In short, it could be made to work. But the EROI is generally inferior to conventional oil and gas; production is capital intensive (lots of drilling); the low density gases produced do not make good transport fuel, but are more suited to electricity production.

    Like I said, some potential. But never look a gift horse in the mouth. The British government almost certainly know that UCG is an expensive diversion. I am not convinced that they are very interested in climate change. They have emptied the North Sea like some kind of colossal enema. They would do it again if they found lots of oil there.

  23. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 4:25 pm 

    Instead of open-pit mining or mountaintop removal, I guess underground coal gasification could be used (to generate electricity).

  24. Them on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 4:56 pm 

    It’s time for a worldwide (leaderless) Resistance to rise up against the America Empire. Humiliation, not aggression, will be America’s defeat.

  25. Cloggie on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 5:15 pm 

    I looked into underground coal gasification some 12 years ago on behalf of the BNP, who were looking for energy policy options that avoided the need for imports in a shtf scenario.

    A lot of things have happened in those 12 years. Nobody was talking at the time about “up to 23 trillion ton of coal”, reports that surfaced only in 2014:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2593032/Coal-fuel-UK-centuries-Vast-deposits-totalling-23trillion-tonnes-North-Sea.html

    A lot has changed in the dynamic factor technology. World-wide people are researching and developing UCG:

    https://tinyurl.com/y6ydvw9l

    “Cost comparison of syngas production from natural gas conversion and underground coal gasification”

    Conclusion: it is not that much different from conventional natural gas.

    And yes, it is more dirty than natural gas. We should avoid UCG if we can and we (in Europe) probably can.

    But one thing is certain: there is enough to fry us all, till kingdom comes, for prices far below the $200/barrel equivalent of coal-gas.

  26. Cloggie on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 5:32 pm 

    UCG:

    EU is working on it:

    https://www.tops-ucg.ic.ac.uk/

    State-of-the-art book:

    https://www.amazon.com/Underground-Gasification-Combustion-Woodhead-Publishing-ebook/dp/B077VNC7QM/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_1

    Dutch, um… South-African research:

    https://academic.oup.com/ce/article/3/1/34/5365870

    African Carbon Energy (Pty) Ltd. (Africary) completed a study integrating its UCG technology with mini gas-to-liquids plant. Syngas from Africary’s Theunissen Underground Coal Gasification (TUCG) project will be used for power production and synthesis of liquid fuels in a unique poly-generation configuration. The TUCG process will consist of two parallel gasifiers, operated on different agents, making the component parts of UCG and coal-to-(any product) (CtX) tightly linked and interdependent, but reducing both cost and emissions. UCG-CtX offers a lower capital investment to conventional underground mining and surface gasification due to the removal of the surface gasifier and coal-mine operations. The gas clean-up systems will remove undesirable components from each gasifier and blend the cleaned syngas for H2:CO ratio control and provide implementation of carbon capture and sequestration. This study has minimized the complexity and optimized the process flow to provide own-use electricity and about 4000 barrels/day equivalent fuels at a capital cost estimate (2017) of about US$ 350 million and operating cost of around 28 US$/barrel.

    There is affordable fossil fuel in obscene abundance. There is too much.

    UCG is like fracking, but cheaper and virtually unlimited, for centuries to come.

  27. Davy on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 5:47 pm 

    Gaia-

    This is a discussion forum, not a site for superficial one-liners that just happen to pop into your head. Or merge the daily idea potpourri into a single post.

    Comply or you will be banned.

  28. Not Davy on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 6:06 pm 

    JuanP posted this

    Davy on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 5:47 pm

  29. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 6:37 pm 

    Our world is facing water shortages but the mainstream media is silent on this important subject. Not only is climate change causing this, but also pollution (from agricultural runoff, mining waste, toxic waste etc.). We have the sciences and technology to resolve this issue but corporate greed is getting in the way. Water is a human right (Our body is 70% water and you can only survive 3 days without water), not a commodity.

  30. Gaia on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 6:39 pm 

    Remember the Water Crisis in Flint, Michigan where the local residents got sick from drinking lead-tainted water?

  31. makati1 on Tue, 23rd Apr 2019 7:30 pm 

    “This is a discussion forum, not a site for superficial one-liners that just happen to pop into your head. Or merge the daily idea potpourri into a single post.”

    Damn! Davy has really gone of the steep end!

    Davy has ZERO power to do shit on here except prove his immaturity/lack of intelligence/brainwashed life. A supposed goat farmer in the back hills of Arkansas…er…Missouri (same difference) Redneck country. Not worth the air he breathes. Destined for a “postal moment” before he is shot down by a SWAT team.

  32. Antius on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 1:59 am 

    ‘EU is working on it’

    Will look into it. It was still speculative 12 years ago.

    I find it absurd that the EU is looking into this, yet is closing down nuclear power plants. Air pollution kills 800,000 people per year in Europe. Are these people retarded?

    Gaia wrote: ‘Water is a human right’

    That is a meaningless statement in this context. Aquifers do not care about human rights. When critical resources run out, there are no human rights to appeal to. People will starve.

  33. Cloggie on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 3:50 am 

    The EU has no power or ambition to “close down nuclear powerplants”.

    France, Belgium and Holland do NOT close down nukes, Germany does. Pure national decision.

    Immigrants likewise. It is Merkel Germany and their insane natzi guilt complexes that is pushing other member states to relieve Germany of their self-inflicted burden, fortunately with zero success. The only winner is the AfD.lol

  34. Davy on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 5:04 am 

    “Damn! Davy has really gone of the steep end! Davy has ZERO power to do shit on here except prove his immaturity/lack of intelligence/brainwashed life.”

    Stupid fuck is not clever enough to see when his best friend juanpee steals my identity. Almost 80 and almost in assisted living describes you well makato.

  35. Davy on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 5:07 am 

    “Gaia wrote: ‘Water is a human right’ That is a meaningless statement in this context.”

    Antius I think Gaia is a regurgitation of Kenz700 from before you were around. Kenz/Gaia is a moralizing bot troll that is just more noise like his Kanadian cousin annoymouse.

  36. Antius on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 7:04 am 

    “UCG is like fracking, but cheaper and virtually unlimited, for centuries to come”

    I have far less time to research this sort of thing nowadays. Basically whatever I can squeeze into my lunch break.

    But you are correct in your analogy of UCG being like fracking. It will require high drilling rates as it is dependant upon extracting product gases from combustion of a non-porous solid fuel. It will require many of the same techniques employed for fracking, such as hydraulic fracturing to create pathways for combustion gases passing through the coal seam. There are also risks associated with seismic disturbance as depleted coal seams close.

    The big difference is that what comes out of the wells will not be light oils, but a mixture of gases, tars and condensates with lower calorific value. These must then be chemically converted into useful fuels.

    I think there are good reasons to be doubtful about the $28/barrel figure. It is also worth keeping in mind that coal is a highly heterogeneous resource. Can we really equate a value derived from relatively shallow onshore deposits in South Africa, to what we could achieve in deep deposits under the North Sea?

  37. Antius on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 7:17 am 

    More Chernobyl bullshit coming from people that know nothing about how population effects are calculated and just want to frighten people into a desired political outcome. So they pick numbers out of the air that are intended to shock people.

    https://tinyurl.com/yyer63ka

    The probability of individual mortality is equal to dose accumulated multiplied by a weighting factor per Sievert. The slightly more tricky part is calculated the dose accumulated, which tends to be dominated by ground shine from caesium.

    Using fairly simple models I was able to calculate the number of mortalities that would result from Fukushima to be about 10,000 without mitigation (i.e. moving people away from contaminated areas and banning contaminated foods). These estimates were pessimistic.

    Whilst the consequences are not trivial, they need to be understood in the context that some 800,000 people die from fossil fuel air pollution in Europe every year and several millions around the world. We would need to suffer a huge number of nuclear accidents in order for radiation health effects to approach what we tolerate already from fossil fuel air pollution.

  38. Gaia on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 8:37 am 

    America is now a paper tiger.

  39. Gaia on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 9:07 am 

    Both the Democrats and Republicans are two sides of the same coin.

  40. Sissyfuss on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 9:35 am 

    Davy, you beat me to it. Gaia is an updated version of Kenz300 (700?) who’s algorithms have expanded beyond overpopulation bromides. Everything old is new again.

  41. Cloggie on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 11:14 am 

    Kenz300.

    Unforgetable poster.

    Insisted that everybody in the third world should have access to family planning, to be paid for by whitey.

    “If you can not provide for yourself you can not provide for a child.”

    And everything was the fault of the “Republicons”.

  42. Cloggie on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 11:38 am 

    Setback for ride-sharing service Moia in Hamburg. Judge says that the planned 1000 vans for end 2019 and 1500 in 2020, can’t be put on the road, as existing taxi drivers need to be protected:

    https://www.spiegel.de/auto/aktuell/moia-vw-fahrdienst-muss-sich-auf-200-shuttle-busse-beschraenken-a-1264221.html

    So far the service is a great success, with many wanting to try it. Often no van is available.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2X1ehdJQSI

    Based on current demand, already 500 vans could be put in service economically in Hamburg, after only 1-2 weeks operation.

    The end goal is to enable autonomous driving, supported by 5G telecommunication, with the potential to phase out private car ownership completely.

  43. Gaia on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 11:39 am 

    Fascism is a cancer to the West.

  44. Gaia on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 12:22 pm 

    The Third World doesn’t need Westernization: it has made life miserable.

  45. Gaia on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 12:31 pm 

    The US is not going to touch one drop of Iran’s oil.

  46. Cloggie on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 12:52 pm 

    “The Third World doesn’t need Westernization: it has made life miserable.”

    It looks like the third world wants to be “miserable” too.

    Polite request: how about putting ten of your “should” and “needs” oneliners into a single post. Makes this board less desolate. Thanks.

  47. Gaia on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 1:04 pm 

    Cloggie, you cannot change the world.

  48. Cloggie on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 1:36 pm 

    “Cloggie, you cannot change the world.”

    If so, why do throw sentences around like “the world should…”, “America needs…”?

    Futile anyway, if we are to believe you.

  49. Gaia on Wed, 24th Apr 2019 7:31 pm 

    Japan is still dealing with the ongoing Fukushima crisis. And nobody pays attention.

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