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So how on earth are we going to power nine million electric cars

Consumption

Earlier this year, car buyers were encouraged to take advantage of the Government’s new environmentally friendly decision to exempt from road tax all electric cars with zero carbon emissions that cost less than £40,000.

Intrigued to see the choices that might be available, I visited a Mitsubishi dealer. The hottest model on the forecourt in this category was the latest hybrid Sports Utility Vehicle.

A salesman told me that if I was interested in buying it and wanted to avoid the slow process of recharging the car overnight using my domestic electricity supply, he could install a more powerful charger on my driveway for free.

I had never realised that owning an electric car involved such a daily palaver. So, put off by the idea of having to plug in the car every night and the potential for overloading our house’s electric circuits, I did not proceed any further.

The futuristic idea of odourless, quiet and perhaps driverless cars travelling down motorways and pootling around our cities may appear to be a green utopia. But Government policies seem to be woefully thought-out and I fear the true economic (and environmental) costs of this new Nirvana will be enormous

The futuristic idea of odourless, quiet and perhaps driverless cars travelling down motorways and pootling around our cities may appear to be a green utopia. But Government policies seem to be woefully thought-out and I fear the true economic (and environmental) costs of this new Nirvana will be enormous

Instead, I went back down the traditional fossil fuel route. I did so reluctantly, considering that petrol, and particularly diesel, engines clearly produce polluting and lethally noxious fumes.

Like many others over the past decades, I feel I have been a victim of irresponsibly confusing messages from government ministers and the motor industry.

It has been a long saga. First, everyone was urged to buy a car fuelled by unleaded petrol, which doesn’t emit as many harmful substances nor damage a car’s exhaust and spark plugs.

Then we were assured by Tony Blair’s Labour government that diesel was cleaner than petrol and we were given financial incentives to buy diesel vehicles.

Some years later we were told that toxic particles from diesel vehicles can work their way through the lungs and into the bloodstream, raising the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

On top of this, we were told lies by car manufacturers — such as Volkswagen — as they deceived us by cheating in emissions tests to pretend their products were less polluting than they actually were.

And so, as the Government announces its latest oh-so-clever green policy — levies on diesel vehicles in heavily-polluted areas and banning all petrol and diesel vehicles from Britain’s roads from 2040 — it is not surprising that we motorists are deeply distrustful of any environmental initiative involving politicians.

True, the futuristic idea of odourless, quiet and perhaps driverless cars travelling down motorways and pootling around our cities may appear to be a green utopia. But Government policies seem to be woefully thought-out and I fear the true economic (and environmental) costs of this new Nirvana will be enormous.

Video playing bottom right…

Although the Government must be praised for its support of BMW after the car-maker decided to build a new generation of battery-powered Minis in Cowley, the lack of investment in the UK in battery technology is shamefully irresponsible. Indeed — surprise, surprise — the power units for the Minis will be imported from Germany

Although the Government must be praised for its support of BMW after the car-maker decided to build a new generation of battery-powered Minis in Cowley, the lack of investment in the UK in battery technology is shamefully irresponsible. Indeed — surprise, surprise — the power units for the Minis will be imported from Germany

For the 2040 ban will mean changing from a society where currently less than 5 per cent of the cars registered (about 90,000) have a form of electric power to 100 per cent (nine million cars) in just 22 years.

Such an ambition must be hubris. The ineluctable truth is that a big increase in the number of electric vehicles on our roads will place a massive demand on our already over-stretched electricity supply.

The National Grid has said it could see peak electricity demand jump by more than the capacity of the planned Hinkley Point C nuclear power station by 2030. (It is hoped the plant will provide 7 per cent of the UK’s electricity.)

The drain on supply from millions of car batteries being charged would reverse the trend in recent years of falling electricity demand, driven by energy efficiency measures.

This is pie-in-the sky politics with little thought given to where the extra electricity will come from. Unless, of course, ministers want to plaster more of the countryside with wind turbines — which a government adviser once admitted that, even if ten per cent of Britain was covered with them, would generate only one sixth of the nation’s energy needs.

The National Grid has said it could see peak electricity demand jump by more than the capacity of the planned Hinkley Point C nuclear power station (computer-generated image, above) by 2030. (It is hoped the plant will provide 7 per cent of the UK’s electricity)

The National Grid has said it could see peak electricity demand jump by more than the capacity of the planned Hinkley Point C nuclear power station (computer-generated image, above) by 2030. (It is hoped the plant will provide 7 per cent of the UK’s electricity)

Even without electric cars, there are fears of future blackouts during winter cold spells.

What’s more, Britain is increasingly dependent on foreign suppliers for electricity — with pipelines coming from the Continent and with giants such as France’s EDF running our nuclear power stations.

This means that not only do we risk losing supply during bad weather, but we are also dependent on good relations with foreign governments.

As for the Government’s energy strategy, the Hinkley Point C nuclear plant has been described by the National Audit Office (NAO) as ‘risky and expensive’ and having ‘uncertain’ economic benefits.

Also, it threatens to be a bad deal for consumers. EDF and China General Nuclear, which are building the plant, will be paid a guaranteed £92.50 per megawatt hour, rising with inflation for 35 years. The NAO says this amounts to a £30 billion subsidy — or between £10 and £15 on an average household’s annual bill.

Although the Government must be praised for its support of BMW after the car-maker decided to build a new generation of battery-powered Minis in Cowley, the lack of investment in the UK in battery technology is shamefully irresponsible. Indeed — surprise, surprise — the power units for the Minis will be imported from Germany.

Overseas, big money and clever brains are being put behind research in this field — such as U.S. entrepreneur Elon Musk, founder of Tesla electric cars, building a £3.9 billion factory for lithium batteries.

And there is another paradox about the Government’s obsession with electric vehicles. For this is a time in history when the availability of carbon fuels has never been so great.

Gone is all apocalyptic talk of ‘peak oil’, of the oil producers’ cartel OPEC pushing up the price of a barrel of crude oil and of reserves drying up.

The truth is that the fracking boom means America is almost oil and gas self-sufficient and no longer dependent on the Middle East. Techniques which allow safer deep-water drilling in the Gulf of Mexico and the Arctic also have vastly increased sources of supply.

So confident is the U.S. of having an energy surplus that it has signed long-term contracts with Centrica, owner of British Gas, to provide the UK with large quantities of liquified natural gas.

The high level of U.S. production, together with renewed output from Iran and Iraq, countries absent from global markets for many years, means that crude oil prices have more than halved in price from $100-a-barrel in recent years.

How perverse, therefore, with technology making diesel and petrol engines cleaner than ever, for British motorists to be forced to swap a fairly cheap source of energy for one which is going to be hugely costly.

No one in government has even told us the cost of spending millions of unnecessary money on the National Grid in order to supply electricity to all those new plug-points.

Moreover, there has not been any discussion of the safety impact of building electricity pillars in homes. Already, there are fears that circuit-breakers would pop under strain, thus cutting off supplies.

All these important issues are ones that Government ministers seem to be ignoring.

How ironic, too, at a time when new petrol and even diesel cars are so much less polluting as a result of catalytic converters and purifying technologies, that Environment Secretary Michael Gove talks about bans and tolls on the most polluted roads.

The right time would be when Britain has a plan for new electricity generating capacity.

Yes, protection of the environment from pollution is important for our health and for future generations. But in the end it is the free market and consumer choice which ought to decide — not politicians who have consistently shown themselves to be both incompetent and wrong when it comes to looking after our transport and energy needs.

daily mail



77 Comments on "So how on earth are we going to power nine million electric cars"

  1. lostboys on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 7:07 am 

    Humans lack the ability to make the correct choices that would benefit their species as a whole. They think and act for their own individual selfish interests which many times is in direct opposition to what is best for their own species. That is why humans will soon fail to remain in this universe.

  2. Davy on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 7:09 am 

    “Moar” with less instead of the wisdom of “no and less”. Too many issues ahead to predict peak demand. Do we continue average global growth or is there an economic decline ahead. In my mind this is the question and it’s one fake greens ignore and the status quo establishment discounts.

    Ev’s are vital to a transformation. They allow options and resilience. Yet, they are not the answer. The answer is with human behavior and that appear a lost cause.

  3. AM on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 7:18 am 

    this peaktard site bans me but allows a nazi. nazism is promoted. we need to go after extremist tard preachers. if your family is hurt by their underlings you go straight for the preachers and kill them.

    we’re not meant to live with infinite resources. even jesus refused it when he’s told to leap off a cliff and everything would be his.

    I’m against cold fusion or other schemes that the green men could possibly provide without killing extremist tards first. we can’t just come up with new distractions and ways to placate them.

  4. AM on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 7:24 am 

    not politicians who have consistently shown themselves to be both incompetent and wrong when it comes to looking after our transport and energy needs.

    there is another popular way to state this and that’s politicians can’t do anything.

    Or if you’d prefer reagan, he said he doesn’t want the government to come and “help”

    Why do they keep saying things without getting to the meat of the matter? It’s because they don’t understand the nature of government.

    Government is a troll. It has its say in everything in life but actually accomplishes a small part of it.

    Or if you prefer to hear from a former Paultard, straight from Frederic Bastiat that men are natural plunderers. Government is set up for plundering.

  5. Makati1 on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 7:42 am 

    Hmmm. Chevy Volt New car price… $36,000.00
    (53 miles on the battery, then use gas to get home.)

    Rule of thumb for the price you can afford is about 6 month’s income = Total cost or $72,000.+ annual income for a Volt.

    Mitsubishi MiEV New car price… $23,000.00 (~$46,000. annual income)
    (62 mile range until dead battery) LMAO

    http://www.chevrolet.com/volt-electric-car
    http://www.autoguide.com/new-cars/2017/mitsubishi/i-miev/es/automatic/prices.html

    Yep, I can see that they will be common someday. NOT!

  6. Jef on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:03 am 

    EVs are not a threat to the FF industries in fact they will insure that every last drop is used to make them happen because…. well just because.

  7. Sissyfuss on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:10 am 

    How not on Earth to power nine million electric cars. Mine asteroids for lithium.

  8. onlooker on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:10 am 

    Yep, the economics just does NOT add up. Then to add to the dilemma, we are reaching the end of the cheap oil which means that we would need to build out this industrial scale EV infrastructure cars with our current energy source Oil that is needed for other critical uses and which in no longer cheap for society. Can we admit too little too late.

  9. Dredd on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:15 am 

    So how on earth are we going to power nine million electric cars?

    For one thing, with power plants built using disgorgement of Oil-Qaeda profits (Oilfluenza, Affluenza, and Disgorgement – 2).

  10. pointer on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:18 am 

    Here’s a novel idea: government incentives for *not* buying a car, EV or otherwise.

  11. Antius on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:32 am 

    We need nuclear reactors to power electric vehicles; otherwise we just shift fossil fuel pollution from the tail pipe to the smoke stack. Renewable energy is not an effective means of generating that power either.

    Here is Euan Mearns report on the success of the El Hierro renewable energy project. Prior to the installation of wind turbines, the island relied upon a combination of diesel generator and hydro power to meet electricity needs. The new system uses the hydro plant as a pumped storage facility to smoothen short-term imbalances between supply and demand and diesel power to fill in interseasonal fluctuations.

    http://euanmearns.com/el-hierro-renewable-energy-project-september-2015-performance-review/

    The system works, in that wind power has reduced total diesel demand, which is an expensive fuel. But the extent of the reduction has been somewhat disappointing, with wind power contributing only about one third of total grid power, non-pumped hydro about 20% and diesel making up the balance. Note also, that there are long periods of time where wind turbine output is low, making it difficult for pumped storage alone to provide back-up without an infeasibly large reservoir. The round trip storage efficiency is also somewhat lower than typically assumed at 60%.

    The implications are clear – the wind power system works but cannot work without both storage and back-up. At higher wind penetration, diesel use could be reduced further, but much of the wind power output must be curtailed (wasted). At moderate penetration levels, we effectively need 3.5 power plants instead of just one – wind turbines, pumped storage, diesel generator and then more wind turbines on top, to cover storage losses. At higher penetration levels, that ratio increases even further, as more and more wind energy is curtailed.

    The implications should be clear. Whereas a utility would only need one nuclear power plant to provide 2GWe of power, the renewable option would effectively require 3.5, with all the capital costs and operational costs that that entails. The addition of electric vehicles would tend to increase short-term demand volatility. This is a problem for nuclear power plants as well, but arguably less so, as the changes in demand are short-term and predictable.

  12. GregT on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:41 am 

    We have already be advised here that 1/2 of all electric power consumption will need to come from conservation by the mid to late 2020s. There are going to be some difficult choices to make. EVs are not one of them.

  13. Cloggie on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:41 am 

    So how on earth are we going to power nine million electric cars?

    350 large 5 MW offshore turbines would suffice + storage infrastructure, although all these car batteries together would in itself already be a part of the storage solution.

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/05/22/wind-power-and-electric-vehicles/

    In Oklahoma they are going to build 2 GW wind power + 350 miles high-voltage line to Tulsa for $4.5B. That’s enough to power 9 million cars.

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/07/27/2-gw-windfarm-to-be-built-in-oklohoma-in-a-red-state/

  14. Antius on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:54 am 

    The author of this sensationalist article does not understand the nature of the global energy crisis – the simple fact that weak demand not over-abundant supply, is the cause of low oil prices. This is driven entirely by weak global economic performance.

    That said, the simple fact that the UK has butchered its entire electrical generation industry, not to mention practically every other industrial capability that it ever had, makes it difficult to see how it can float this fantasy. The author has at least picked up on that.

  15. AM on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 9:05 am 

    “We need nuclear reactors to power electric vehicles; otherwise we just shift fossil fuel pollution from the tail pipe to the smoke stack. Renewable energy is not an effective means of generating that power either.”

    for an intelligent peaktard, this is unthinkable. nuclear is fossil, hello!

    i swear tards try to confuse me. we should work together instead of against each other.

  16. GregT on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 9:07 am 

    The UK should be commended for talking about alternate energy schemes, even if futile. AGW is not only a UK problem, but a planetary one. Taking 9 million ICE vehicles off of the roads, and replacing them with EVs that also require fossil fuels in their manufacture, maintenance, and highways infrastructure, will do absolutely nothing to solve the planetary emergency that we all face.

  17. Hubert on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 9:22 am 

    It’s delusional to think that the world cound run on EV’s. Electricity has to be generated by power stations running on fosil fuel.

    Most of these stupid politicians cannot get beyond magical thinking. There is a certain unwillingness to face reality.

  18. Cloggie on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 9:31 am 

    Perhaps I am missing something, but there are 32 million, not 9 million cars in Albion.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/299972/average-age-of-cars-on-the-road-in-the-united-kingdom/

  19. GregT on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 9:40 am 

    The humans are addicted to energy, and the growth that it provides. They will tell themselves comforting stories about how they can continue on that growth trajectory, while destroying their one and only little blue planet.

    Infinite exponential growth in a finite environment is a physical and mathematical impossibility. Growth is going to end, and when it does, the humans are in for an entire world of hurt.

  20. Stanley on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 9:47 am 

    Peak oil, huh?

    Is this the same “peak oil” we supposedly experienced in the 80’s? And then, the 90’s?

    2017 and we’re still just about to run out of oil? The “end of cheap oil”? Yeah, that’s what they said when oil was $150/bbl, now hovering around $50.

    How many times does one have to be wrong?

  21. GregT on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 9:52 am 

    That’s what they said when oil was hovering around $20/bbl. Now that it’s hovering around $50/bbl, they are pretending that peak conventional oil never occurred, and that the global financial crisis was caused by the TBTF banks. The humans are smart like that. Ignorance is bliss.

  22. Hello on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 9:56 am 

    Stanley, is that you, Shorty? Aka AdamB?

  23. Ralph on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 10:44 am 

    20% of UK electricity came from renewables in the last year. Only 7% came from coal. Next year it will be more. It is not enough and will probably never be enough, but EVs need relatively little new infrastructure and the cost and carbon footprint of batteries is also falling. Current EVs consume less fossil fuels in their lifetime than ICE’s even allowing for manufacture, the batteries can be replaced and reused or recycled and the rest of the car will last indefinitely. EVs will not save industrial society but they will help destroy it more slowly.

  24. onlooker on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 10:55 am 

    Well, Stanley nice to have comforting thoughts uh? This ‘cheap’ oil is proving too expensive to the marginal shale frackers and others who sinking further into economic ruin. Like everyone else it seems the world cannot function without its drug ie. lending

  25. Kenz300 on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 11:20 am 

    Wind and solar are safer, cleaner and cheaper.

    Cheaper WINS !

    People are beginning to divest from fossil fuels.

    Look how fast people lost their shirts with the coal bankruptcies.

  26. superpeasant on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 12:08 pm 

    The Daily Mail is absolutely not a credible source. It is edited by Paul Dacre, a bad-tempered old man who treats his staff disgracefully with foul language.. He was one of the main drivers of the Brexit disaster and is also very keen on spreading untruths about climate change to his equally-elderly readership.

  27. Plantagenet on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 12:17 pm 

    1. Wind and solar are NOT cheaper. Their costs are coming down quickly, but they still remain more expensive then FF.

    2. Since the sun doesn’t shine at night and the wind does’t blow all the time, you can’t have a grid that is 100% wind and solar. You need other dependable power sources that can operate on demand when wind and solar can’t.

    Cheers!

  28. onlooker on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 12:45 pm 

    And Kenz , most importantly for our energy dependent societies renewable sources are no where near as concentrated and energy packed as fossil fuels. After our Economies are sunk with the end of the oil age, good luck scaling up renewable or nuclear energy sources

  29. rockman on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 1:11 pm 

    P – “…you can’t have a grid that is 100% wind and solar.” Sure we can: when we have sufficient commercial storage capacity that is economical. When will that happened? The Rockman won’t even offer a WAG. But as I mentioned elsewhere: I bet it happen in Texas first.

  30. energy investor on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 5:47 pm 

    Ah Rockman,

    I see you have been spying on the mythological EESU in Austin…. lol

  31. Bloomer on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 6:19 pm 

    How are we going to power all them cars…well I am hoping not with coal fired power plants. Solars panels to power homes would free up power for autos. Wind and tide turbines could be of assistance.

    Hydroelectric projects like Site C in British Columbia with have the capacity to produce 1,100 MW.

    New generation Candu reactors Advanced Fuel Candu Reactor (AFCR) soon to be build in China are much safer method of power generation. Also they recycle spent uranium as fuel.

    Smart power grids and the smoothing of power used during peaks hours also is part of the solution. (Charge up your car at nighttime).

    Tesla Motors ramping up production with the Model 3. The future is here. The coal barons and oil dinosaurs will soon be extinct.

  32. Makati1 on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 6:48 pm 

    Dream on Bloomer. That techie Koolaid is addictive.

  33. Bloomer on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 6:55 pm 

    And I suppose you still use whale oil to light up your house Makati1.

  34. Go Speed Racer on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 7:47 pm 

    Ya power 9 million electric cars,
    with 9 million sofa fires.

    Waste to energy, that is.

  35. Makati1 on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:00 pm 

    Bloomer, Actually, over 29 percent of the electric here is from hydro, geothermal and wind. However, it will never be 100%.

    http://mecometer.com/whats/philippines/electricity-production-by-source/

    Philippine per capita use of electric is about 680 kWh PER YEAR, vs US 13,000 kWh.

    http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EG.USE.ELEC.KH.PC

    I live in a 3rd world country that uses 1/20th the petro per capita as the U$, about 1 pint per day vs the US 2+ gallons.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_oil_consumption

    Have you even considered how YOU will buy those things without an income? THAT is where the US is headed. A US depression that will make 1929 seem like a party. Food, water and shelter will be the only important items in your life and tech will be history. Wait and see.

  36. boat on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:10 pm 

    Dear daily mail, why do you put out disinformation like greggiet and his puppet antius.

    First the US is still close to 5 mbpd oil dependent. Even a renewable and electric car fan believes in fair realistic reporting.

    The world is growing to fast and oil demand is to strong if you want future generations to have fewer climate issues.

    greggiet cant grasp it’s the fuel renewables create that is cleaner than oil. As coal is displaced, cleaner yet. As nat gas is displaced, cleaner yet. To keep your head from exploding think in terms of 50 percent FF by 2050-2060, not 80 percent. Every year projections will be better but a zero FF straw man argument is stupid like most of your repeated ideas.

  37. Bloomer on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:42 pm 

    Makati although I live in North America I buy want I need not what I want.And I do consider the possibility of economic collapse followed by a deep depression.

    The oil industry is the most heavily subsidized on the planet. They influence public policy to keep the status quo. Until public opinion changes big oil and coal will continue to emit carbon into the atmosphere
    This causes the warming of our planet very simple science. As a result…
    Island countries like yours and the island I live on will continue to watch our shorelines disappear.

  38. baha on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 8:52 pm 

    Kenz300 is my hero. Just stay on message until the world comes around. Thank you dude 🙂

  39. Makati1 on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 10:47 pm 

    Bloomer, yes, the oceans will rise, but at different speeds and levels depending on where you are located in the world. http://e360.yale.edu/features/the_secret_of_sea_level_rise_it_will_vary_greatly_by_region

    As for the Philippines, by the time it is a problem here, it will have devastated most shore cities around the world. I don’t worry about it as the farm is at an elevation way above any melt or temp increase level in the next 100+ years, even if today’s rates triple. It is located 100 miles from Manila and the first big storm will close the two roads that lead to the small town nearby, probably forever. Every big storm even now closes them, sometimes for days or longer. The only accessible means will be a very long walk over a mountain range.

    Self-sufficiency is the key. I hope you are prepared. No one knows the future.

  40. boat on Fri, 28th Jul 2017 11:15 pm 

    mak,

    I just saw a show where a couple bought an island with a resort for 18 million. If you stay there you are flown in by plane. There is life outside Manila.

  41. Kevin Cobley on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 12:05 am 

    “The truth is that the fracking boom means America is almost oil and gas self-sufficient and no longer dependent on the Middle East. Techniques which allow safer deep-water drilling in the Gulf of Mexico and the Arctic also have vastly increased sources of supply.”
    The “TRUTH” is The U.S is importing 8 million barrels of Oil per day or about 45% of total consumption, that’s as good as it’s ever going to get.

  42. Kevin Cobley on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 12:14 am 

    People seem completely unaware how much energy goes into powering a car, try pushing your car to work.
    It’s very clear that insufficient affordable Lithium and Rare earth resources exist to allow anything but a small fraction of todays internal combustion engine powered cars to be replaced.
    To supply electricity to replace oil would require an electrical distribution system with more than 3 times todays capacity, it’s not going to happen even over a 50 year timescale.
    The availability of copper with a price now of over $10,000 per tonne is also problematical.
    The only EV’s that we can have with any certainty is mass transit subways and street cars.

  43. Simon on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 1:15 am 

    As Cloggie and any EU members are aware, there is a rollout of ‘smartmeters’.
    Whilst ostensibly to ‘save you money’ the actual reason, is so that you are ready for when, we start to expose the consumer to the vagaries of the market (price rises in peak etc).
    There has been considerable thought put into EV charging, don’t panic.
    You will not be charging 100% of every car, every day. If you tell me how many km’s you drive yesterday, that is how much energy needs to replaced. This will be done at offpeak, so no worries, this will be accomplished by alts/storage and one or two extra CCGT’s. For the Englishers, it would just lovely if you could commission another Nuk. from us at 150Eur per Mwh GUARANTEED for 30 yrs (ha ha ha ha ha ha ha … you couldn’t make it up)

  44. Cloggie on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 2:18 am 

    As Cloggie and any EU members are aware, there is a rollout of ‘smartmeters’.

    I was even fanatic to the tune that I BOUGHT one before I got one “rolled out”.

    Since then, I’m pressing F5 all day to see how many kWh’s my Godly panels have produced over the last hour, while making a guestimate beforehand, based on my observations of the sky above the houses of my neighbors at the other side of the street. And getting better at predicting all the time.

    You will not be charging 100% of every car, every day.

    If you are an average, boring, law-abiding, lawn-mowing Hollander with an Opel Ampera, who only uses his car to drive to his boring job, while driving his boring average 34 km/day, you will merely have to “fill her up” once in every two weeks:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/07/21/opel-ampera-e-chevrolet-bolt/

  45. boat on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 3:24 am 

    Kevin C,

    US is net a 5 mbpd per day deficit. Go to the eia web site. In the search box type in….import export. For the last 5 months, a bit lower. Click on history for fun charts.

  46. Makati1 on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 3:44 am 

    Boat, there are over 7,000 islands that make up the Philippines. Most are in the center of the country. Why would I want to live on an island that depends on a plane to come and go and probably doesn’t have a reliable water/food supply? Also, they would be the most exposed to the typhoons that frequent the Ps.

    There are a lot of fools with money that come here and build mansions. Targets for the kidnappers in the southern part of the country. I stay low profile. I’m not stupid.

    The location of the farm is perfect for after the collapse. For the many reasons I have already expressed. Manila is a convenient location while the road into the property is built and the house to follow. They are underway.

    All things move slower here so it is taking longer than planned to actually finish the project. We are in the rainy season now. However, there is already a building on the site that is adequate and would be used in an emergency. It has electric, water, food, cell phone connections and even a satellite cable connection. And a most beautiful view.

  47. Anonymouse on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 4:14 am 

    Mak, boat is, to put it mildly, retarded. He just mashes out whatever random output his scrambled neurons put together. He has no idea where the Philippines even are. He just dumps out the results of his random google searches, nothing more. He likely saw the word ‘island’ and ‘Philippines’ used together and decided that sounded clever clever enough to go with that. Nothing more.

  48. Jan on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 5:32 am 

    Answer is easy, we will build more nuclear power stations.

    http://namrc.co.uk/intelligence/uk-new-build-plans/

    One Nuclear power plant on a 100 acre site will produce 28,000,000Mw/h of electricity in a year.
    More importantly it will produce 3,200Mw per hour when we need it.

    The UK already has nearly 8,000 wind turbines
    http://www.renewableuk.com/page/UKWEDhome

    Yet the production from these things is pathetic considering the tens of thousands of acres they cover. Often producing less than 1,000Mw or 2% of our needs.

  49. Makati1 on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 6:08 am 

    Anon, I guess you are correct. That last comment of his was a bit off the path, but I answered anyway. I do feel sorry for him.

  50. Davy on Sat, 29th Jul 2017 6:36 am 

    So, what you are saying makati is you are fine and everyone else is screwed? That is typical of your narcissistic bragging. You want others to suffer and in your mind you think you are safe. You now live right in the middle of a sprawling 20MIL urban area. You are living it up on a western lifestyle preaching about how bad it is. You also think you are going to get out when the going gets tough and get 100 mi to the fantasy farm. You think because a few roads will be blocked those 20MIL people will not attempt to move a few trees. We are talking young strong people not old worn out ones like you. You then talk about self-sufficiency but you are never at the fantasy farm. You never farm but you act like you do daily here. You act like climate change is an issues for other not you. You discount and disregard the fact that the P’s is ranked in the top 3 for climate change dangers. What a loon.

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