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Megadam: ‘Obsolete Technology’ Wreaks Havoc across the Americas

Megadam: ‘Obsolete Technology’ Wreaks Havoc across the Americas thumbnail

It’s a technology that’s been all but abandoned in wealthy countries, where costs began outpacing benefits decades ago. Yet a global boom in major dam construction, mainly in developing countries, is currently underway, with an estimated 3,700 now under construction or in the planning stages. Latin America is ground zero for much of this development, with nearly 400 slated for the Amazon region alone. Booming populations need power and water, and hydro dams can provide both.

Leer este artículo en español aquí.

Megadams have fragmented and transformed more than 60% of the planet’s rivers, choking off the flow of water, and life. In 2000, according to the World Commission on Dams, there were 47,000 large dams built in the world; that is, more than half of the world’s rivers were dammed, causing the displacement of 80 million people. In Mexico, according to the 2012 report, Dams, Rights of the Peoples and Impunity, more than 4,200 dam projects have been built in Mexico alone, causing the displacement and forced eviction of more than 185,000 people from all over the country.

This article is part of a series on the impacts of megadams in the Americas. Read more here.

Critics warn that the costs far outweigh the benefits, especially in an era of climate change, when unprecedented droughts followed by torrential downpours make these structures more vulnerable. Hidden costs like biodiversity destruction, generation of greenhouse gases, loss of life and livelihoods and the devastation of human communities are seldom taken into account – and they make a powerful case that this supposedly “green” form of development is actually anything but.

An emblematic project currently in the spotlight in Western Mexico is the El Zapotillo System (which includes, besides a dam with the same name, an aqueduct starting there which ends in Leon, Guanajuato and another dam: El Purgatorio-Arcediano) to provide water to the cities of Leon and Guadalajara, Jalisco.

María González Valencia, water protector and activist of the Mexican Institute for Community Development (Tracy L. Barnett photo)

Maria González Valencia, activist and water protector of the Mexican Institute for Community Development (IMDEC, for its initials in Spanish) and previously with MAPDER, the Movement of Dam-Affected People in Defense of the Rivers. She’s worked long enough on this issue to see the huge economic, environmental and social costs they generate.

“We need to fight against an obsolete technology that in other countries is no longer regarded as an option,” she said. “On the contrary, they have virtually stopped building them in most European Union countries and in the United States. Dams that already exist in those places are now being dismantled and their rivers restored,” states the community leader, who has been at the forefront of the fight to save the villages of Temacapulín, Acasico and Palmarejo against inundation by the mega project.

González cites the seminal 2000 World Commission on Dams report and many others in her condemnation of the wave of hydro dam construction across the Americas.

“In Latin America and specifically in Mexico, this continues to be an inviable alternative from the perspective of an integrated water management, since huge engineering projects and hydraulic constructions are involved without considering social and environmental impacts. Even in economic terms they’re a poor alternative, because as time goes by, they tend to double or triple their cost.”

The WCD report points that “in too many cases an unacceptable and often unnecessary price has been paid to secure those benefits [related to the dams], especially in social and environmental terms, by people displaced, by communities downstream, by taxpayers and by the natural environment.”

This is the case in El Zapotillo, said Gonzalez. “After 14 years fighting against El Zapotillo Dam, it’s beyond proven that it’s an expensive alternative which has implied scandalous processes of corruption.”

The residents of Temacapulín, Acasico and Palmarejo have fought to save their towns from a megadam for more than a decade, leading normally peaceful working folk to extreme measures. Photo: Marco Von Borstel, International Rivers

Journalist Sonia Serrano echoes Gonzalez’ criticism in El Zapotillo: Omissions, Errors and Corruption, a 2018 story for the newspaper NTR Guadalajara. She states that the aqueduct from El Zapotillo to Leon got authorities facing legal issues “First, because of the corruption over the contract with the Spanish construction company Abengoa and Jalisco, the state workers’ money was deposited to try to save the constructor from its economic crisis; however, it was not enough to help the constructor to set even a single pipe.” Around $604 million pesos, or USD $31.5 million, was taken from the state workers’ pension fund as an unsuccessful bailout of the project.

Besides Abengoa, two other contractors walked away with an additional $1.4 billion pesos (USD $72 million), according to Agustin del Castillo of Milenio.

Proponents argue that since El Zapotillo Dam is 87 percent finished, it should be completed and placed into service. González points out that the entire system necessary for the dam to be operational is less than half finished. (International Rivers photo)

State governments from Jalisco and Guanajuato maintain that, since the dam is almost finished, it should be used to provide water to both territories. Gonzalez counters that in terms of the whole system, it’s less than half finished: the dam is 87 percent finished, but the planned 140-kilometer aqueduct is only 5 percent done, and El Purgatorio-Arcediano dam is stalled at 30 percent after 15 years.

Gonzalez finds it unacceptable that the costs of the project rose over 350 percent during this period without even halfway finishing it. In 2006, at the beginning of the project, the government put the cost at $7 billion pesos (USD $350 million); costs have now risen to $35 billion pesos ($1.7 million USD). If this project is finished, it would cost an estimated $71 billion pesos (almost $3.6 billion USD).

Jalisco Gov. Enrique Alfaro, once a defender of Temacapulin, now supports the dam, and questions the motives of opponents.

“Who is behind the idea of doing nothing regarding our water issues? Who has an interest in that? That’s what we must have in mind,” said Alfaro in July.

But González sees things differently. “It’s a project that will be under construction for 16 years; it’s been 14 years since they started. The lifespan of this type of dam is 25 to 30 years. Under what kind of financial or economic logic does it make sense to build a project that will take half its life to build? At what cost? What are the consequences?” she questions.

Basilica of the Virgin of Remedios, the iconic colonial church at the heart of Temacapulín (Tracy L. Barnett photo)

 The dam violates Human Rights

Building this type of mega project violates the fundamental rights of the people and their communities, and the rights of nature, as well, as González and IMDEC have documented.

“So far, we have counted 20 rights violations, such as the right to information, the right to consultation, the right to participate; that is, the three fundamental rights previous to the approval of any mega project like El Zapotillo have been violated.”

But there are other violations, as well, such as the forced displacement that happened in Palmarejo village.

“If those people made the decision to move or sell, it was under threat. The companies and the government didn’t organize consultations, there wasn’t accurate information and there were no processes of participation. Thus, they forced people to move through strategies of harassment and menace.” This case is documented in Recommendation 50-2018 of the State Human Rights Commission of Jalisco (CNDHJ, for its initials in Spanish)

The recommendation was issued against Jalisco authorities “for the violations of the rights to legality and legal security, to property, to housing, to preservation of the environment, to the common heritage of humanity, to development and health, caused by the National Water Commission (Conagua, for its initials in Spanish) and local state authorities from Jalisco and Guanajuato for their attempts to flood the communities of Temacapulín, Acasico and Palmarejo.”

Marta Leticia Alvarez Reyes, former resident of Palmarejo, maintains that the government forced her family to leave their village. “They started with threats, forcing us to negotiate with Conagua (the National Water Commission), because if we weren’t going to negotiate, they weren’t going to pay us, and they were going to expropriate the land.” (Tracy L. Barnett photo)

In the eyes of the activist, there are other rights affected, such as “the one for a healthy environment. Despite the pause in construction now, it has advanced and there is evident devastation of the environment,” she said.

Megadams vulnerable to climate change

Monti Aguirre, Latin America coordinator for International Rivers, has been following the El Zapotillo case since the beginning, and says it’s typical of what’s been happening around the world. She worries that with the rush to respond to climate change, governments and development banks are seizing on the “false solution” of hydro dams, with sometimes catastrophic results.

Monti Aguirre/International Rivers

“Something that needs to change is this misconception that dams are clean,” she said. For one thing, they eliminate an entire carbon sink – the forest – which then decays under the water and emits significant amounts of methane, one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For another, there are also severe impacts on biodiversity and water quality throughout the watershed.

“The other thing about hydro is that it’s very vulnerable to climate change; dams end up losing generating capacity becaue of drought. You can see reservoirs where the level has been going down.”

One of the most drastic examples is the Guri dam in Venezuela, the source of more than 60 percent of the country’s electricity. The reservoir has lost 79% of its water level due to an extreme drought, creating a national energy crisis.

Another concern is dam vulnerability to extreme rains, which are coming more often and are more severe.

“This is a technology that hasn’t had any significant breakthroughs in decades, and it’s not the solution for climate change,” she said. “That’s just one of many things that make us think this is a technology that’s of the past.”

The Guri dam in Venezuela, the source of more than 60 percent of the country’s electricity. The reservoir has lost 79% of its water level due to an extreme drought, creating a national energy crisis. (Photo/Social media)

‘Free the Green River:’ Many alternatives to El Zapotillo Dam

The communities of Temacapulìn, Acasico and Palmarejo have for years proposed alternatives to provide the necessary water supply that do not require the flooding and disappearance of their territory.

For the activist María González “the struggle of these peasant peoples in Jalisco against the El Zapotillo project is a struggle for life; their central demand is a Water Revolution, that is, moving towards a new paradigm of water management, a new model where water is considered as the sustenance of life and cultures rather than as a business opportunity; that respects and guarantees the human rights to health, food, water, life, the self-determination of peoples and the rights of nature over the rights of capital.

What Temacapulín is calling for with its “Water Revolution” is the democratization of a sector that has been rife with corruption and abuse of power since the technology began proliferating throughout the region in the 1950s. They are asking their leaders to implement an integrated water resource management policy, one that takes into account the needs of the environment and all the affected parties, not just industries and metropolitan populations. And they are calling on their compatriots to return to their roots, to come back home to their villages and revitalize the rural economy.

“The proposal is that there is water for everyone, water forever, water that respects the hydrological cycle, that respects the nature and rights of people and that these policies are constructed from below, from the communities, in the villages and in the neighborhoods. That people really have control of the resource; what has been proposed is how to move from an obsolete model to a new paradigm, where the center is in nature and involving people in the decision making… Because another kind of water management is possible,” the activist concluded hopefully.

“The Water Revolution: Save Temaca, Acasico and Palmarejo,” from a wall in Temacapulín. (Tracy L. Barnett)

 

Teaser photo credit: Temacapulín, one of three towns slated to go under the waters of the Green River with the finalization of El Zapotillo Dam. (Tracy L. Barnett photo)

 

Esperanza Project



41 Comments on "Megadam: ‘Obsolete Technology’ Wreaks Havoc across the Americas"

  1. claes on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 5:07 pm 

    The Chinese destruction of the Mekong is not even mentioned, all though it’s one of the greatest disasters coming for South East Asia.
    In South America communism means less dams, while in South East Asia communism means more dams.
    Communism in East Asia today means state capitalism , while in south america, socialism is more in the interest of the people. That is why there is this great difference in their views on dams.

  2. makati1 on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 5:37 pm 

    As always, the US is not included in the article, just those “other countries”. The area of PA that I lived in has 3 dams on the Susquehanna River that, even today, provides much of the electric for that area. Many square miles of land was covered to do that. Many people were relocated. They are private owned, not government.

    “There are an estimated 84,000 dams in the United States, impounding 600,000 mi (970,000 km) of river or about 17% of rivers in the nation.” But of course, hypocrisy is common in Amerika.

    BTW: Most of those dams don’t even produce electric. They were created for recreation or transport of goods. A waste, which is also common in Amerika. Who cares if there is loss of land and wildlife if you can make $$$$$? Amerikans certainly don’t.

  3. claes on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 5:51 pm 

    Mak, modern dams are most always destructive, being chinese, american, pi’s or what ever. Dams are allways for the interests of the city people and seldom for those who live of and around the river.
    Be fair now

  4. makati1 on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 6:33 pm 

    Claes, so, a few thousand are to block the use for millions? Not in this world. You must live in fantasy land.

    I would say the dams are ALWAYS for the benefit of the rich to make more $$$. I think it is called ‘rape of resources for profit’…er…capitalism.

    BTW: How are “modern dams” more destructive than those built 100 years ago? Just asking. Don’t the locals also get the bennies? Electric, recreation, etc?

  5. makati1 on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 6:41 pm 

    Followup to support my previous assertion that climate change may be the reason typhoons are now forming about 1,000 miles farther north then usual and hitting Japan more often.

    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/10/23/national/extreme-weather-japan-experts-rain-floods-typhoons/#.XbOE2q8RWUk

    “With torrential rain, raging rivers and submerged homes, the havoc wrought by Typhoon Hagibis was a grim reminder that extreme weather may now be the new norm in this disaster-prone nation….

    “Typhoon risks for midlatitude countries such as Japan are definitely escalating,” he said, adding that Faxai and Hagibis, the 15th and 19th named storms of the season, respectively, were among the strongest to make landfall in the Kanto and Tokai regions since the Meteorological Agency began keeping records in 1951.”

    Will this also be the new norm for hurricanes? Forming farther north and hitting New England? We shall see. Stay tuned…

  6. River runner on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 7:08 pm 

    Some dams were built mainly for flood control, is. In the PNW.

  7. claes on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 7:26 pm 

    WE – the city dwellers claime nature as belonging to us.
    As we are also the majority, we have the right to protect our own needs and our personal security.
    If we had been a smaller part of the population we would of course not have made such a propostuous claim, but now we are in fact the majority., and we even have the greatest military power.
    There fore all other minorities (and nature) must adjust to the fact that We make all major decissions from now off.
    We wish the best for al minorities and all present living species. But don’t threaten us, because then we migth get angry and that would not be good for you or this so called “nature”.
    We love peace and security, We hope you love that too.

    Kind regards from your own loving supervisor (beijing,washington, london and moscow)

  8. makati1 on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 7:38 pm 

    River, but floods don’t need controlled if you do not build on the flood plain. However, the wealthy want river front property, no matter the cost to the environment. Control the water levels and sell the land for big $$$$. Profit above all.

  9. claes on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 7:55 pm 

    Mak,you make me wish for the next black death.
    “so, a few thousand are to block the use for millions? Not in this world. You must live in fantasy land.”

  10. makati1 on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 8:37 pm 

    Be careful what you wish for claes, it is likely to happen in the next few years.

    “Plague can still be fatal despite effective antibiotics, though it is lower for bubonic plague cases than for septicemic or pneumonic plague cases. It is hard to assess the mortality rate of plague in developing countries, as relatively few cases are reliably diagnosed and reported to health authorities.”

    WE are killing the effectiveness of antibiotics by their over use and they may not be effective if/when the next plague breaks out. Not to mention the millions flying around the world daily to carry it.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/06/28/plague-exists-and-its-not-only-old-time-disease-still-lurking/435142001/

    https://www.healthline.com/health-news/why-medieval-diseases-are-hitting-cities-hard

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/medieval-diseases-flare-as-unsanitary-living-conditions-proliferate/

    These articles are not about some distant 3rd world country, they are about 3rd wold Amerika today.

  11. supremacist muzzies jerk on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 9:30 pm 

    makati1 on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 6:41 pm

    Followup to support my previous assertion that climate change may be the reason typhoons are now forming about 1,000 miles farther north then usual and hitting Japan more often.

    supertard, i think in the long term, there’d be fewer destructive storms because supertard’s clog’s death blades are taking so much energy out of the air. remember these death blades work around the clock whenever and wherever wind are most intense. each of those death monument operating over a day should slow the storm down a few MPH or so, that’s the climate change.

  12. peakyeast on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 9:36 pm 

    The good thing about cities is that it optimizes the usage of large scale bombs.

  13. makati1 on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 9:56 pm 

    peaky, or the larger death toll when the SHTF and there is nothing to eat or electric or even water. It also makes large scale riots possible in a downturn. Cities are death traps.

  14. claes on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 9:58 pm 

    mak, the strange thing is that it hasn’t happened yet. But maybe the viruses don’t have the time to turn really dangerous before it’s already around the globe, and people get some kind of resistence to them. IDK

  15. supremacist muzzies jerk on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 10:04 pm 

    claes on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 9:58 pm
    the whole thing about pandemics is real and hype. remember a decade ago, the WHO said we’re all going to die?

    we need real supertards who understand pandemics and have support of the media to propagate better understanding of its dynamic.

  16. supremacist muzzies jerk on Fri, 25th Oct 2019 10:09 pm 

    the full cost of the Three Gorges Dam was recovered by December 20, 2013

    this one is a profitable dam.

    they also doing a good job holding muzzies for muzzies anti rape machine, muzzies amputation machine, muzzie hamster machine

  17. makati1 on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 12:48 am 

    claes, I’m not sure about developing resistance. IF, and there is that big word again, Ebola was to board a flight from Africa to say, Heathrow in the UK, then JFK in New York and on to LA, and the carrier then went into the city, how many people would be exposed in less than 24 hours? It feels like a flu when it starts, but by then, hundreds, maybe thousands, have come in contact with the person by using the airplane bathroom, or a door knob that was touched by the carrier, or….and then they transmit and then…

    If you want to see how fast it can be transported look at this…

    https://www.flightradar24.com/7.85,138.47/2

    BTW: Ebola deaths are still 90% of those infected.

  18. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 8:32 am 

    Somebody made an inventory of all potential pumped-hydro storage sites around the planet. The outcome is surprisingly positive: more than 500,000!

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2019/10/26/global-pumped-hydro-atlas/

    This does not involve damns, like referred to in the article, but a pipe and pump/generator between two different basins at different altitude.

  19. Davy on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 8:48 am 

    “Somebody made an inventory of all potential pumped-hydro storage sites around the planet. The outcome is surprisingly positive: more than 500,000!”

    Was cost discussed?

  20. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 9:15 am 

    Cost:

    ““Pumped hydro accounts for 97 percent of energy storage worldwide, has a typical lifetime of 50 years and is the lowest cost large-scale energy-storage technology available.””

    There is no cheaper electricity storage than pumped-hydro.

  21. Davy on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 9:18 am 

    No cheaper does not mean cheaper to begin with. Back to reality. The cost of pumped hydro are far beyond what
    Society can afford on the scale Cloggo is alluding to.

  22. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 11:37 am 

    Empire dave has his desired conclusion already drawn: nothing is going to work other than “deep green adaptation goat farming in the Ozarks”.

    No need to come with a back-on-an-envelope calculation as to why this kind of storage could not be part of a general storage solution.

    Solutions are not desirable, a great die-off is. Sinister chap, our empire dave.

  23. Duncan Idaho on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 11:41 am 

    Trading in call options on the Cboe Volatility Index, known as the VIX, outweighed puts by more than 2-to-1 on Friday with the index at its lowest level since July as stocks rallied. The standout trade was one block of 50,000 April $65 calls that were bought for 10 cents. Those contracts would imply a surge in the VIX of almost 500% from its current level.

    Hmmm–

  24. Davy on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 12:32 pm 

    “Empire dave has his desired conclusion already drawn: nothing is going to work other than “deep green adaptation goat farming in the Ozarks”.”
    That is not at all the case REAL Green is very personal and local strategies that begin with honest behavior. In that case it counts you out cloggo. What also counts you out is your primary techno based strategies for solutions to your fantasy 100% renewable transition. Being a hateful white racist counts you out also

    “No need to come with a back-on-an-envelope calculation as to why this kind of storage could not be part of a general storage solution.”
    Cloggo, if storage were at all affordable in widespread applications storage projects would be popping up all over but they are not

    “Solutions are not desirable, a great die-off is. Sinister chap, our empire dave.”
    Please document where I wish for a die off. You are the war pig constantly referencing your desire for another “great” war that will kill millions and of course you stress no white Eurotards.

    Cloggo is a disingenuous liar

  25. Davy on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 12:35 pm 

    “Those contracts would imply a surge in the VIX of almost 500% from its current level.”

    Idaho, the vix is not what it used to be in regards to understanding true volatility. CB’s have introduced repression and artificial liquidity that has greatly adapted the markets price discovery mechanisms. I used to follow it all the time.

  26. Anonymouse on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 1:15 pm 

    Exceptionalturd, the only two things you follow all the time, are, ‘JuanP’, and your favorite surviving goat.

    Thats it dumbass.

  27. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 1:16 pm 

    “Cloggo, if storage were at all affordable in widespread applications storage projects would be popping up all over but they are not”

    Wrong. Storage is not needed, yet.

  28. Davy on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 2:26 pm 

    annoymouse, when are you going to realize you are an irrelevant stalking nobody. No one cares what you think now that your gang is toothless and pretty much AWOL. JuanP is outed as a complete lunatic and he is your best friend the other being makato and he is hardly here anymore.. What a fucknut

  29. Davy on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 2:28 pm 

    “Wrong. Storage is not needed, yet.”

    BS, cloggo, then why are batteries being used instead of pump storage?

  30. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 2:53 pm 

    “BS, cloggo, then why are batteries being used instead of pump storage?”

    Batteries are hardly used in the grid.

    Batteries are for stabilising seconds and minutes.
    Pumped storage for hours.

    The missing link is chemical storage for weeks and months.

  31. Davy on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 3:00 pm 

    No shit Cloggo but increasingly batteries are used as well as gas turbines. Many baseline power sources remain because of lack of storage to eliminate their need.

  32. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 3:01 pm 

    Different storage forms and their position in the general picture:

    https://deepresource.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/ees-storage.jpg

  33. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 3:07 pm 

    Try to let this sink in, bush ranger:

    ““Pumped hydro accounts for 97 percent of energy storage worldwide, has a typical lifetime of 50 years and is the lowest cost large-scale energy-storage technology available.””

    97%.

    Grid batteries are in a very early stage.

    “Many baseline power sources remain because of lack of storage to eliminate their need.”

    Another BS sentence aimed at looking intelligent but in reality covering up a total lack of understanding.

  34. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 3:13 pm 

    Here is a better graph, setting storage time off against storage form:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2018/12/31/large-scale-energy-storage-in-the-netherlands/

  35. supremacist muzzies jerk on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 3:29 pm 

    Anonymouse on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 1:15 pm
    anontard, please be respectful of supertard

    supertard when we were younger we fight about women. are you going to keep fighting about nothing until you’re near death like supertard makati1? that’s why i proposed to be a Nixon going to china and promote peace. I also thanked you for exceeding my goal of defending supertard america. you can rest.

  36. Davy on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 4:14 pm 

    “Try to let this sink in, bush ranger:”

    dull n dutch, how much storage is there in relation to renewable power production? For some reason that does not sink in?? What is out there currently was mainly constructed for peak shaving not renewable storage.

  37. Cloggie on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 4:27 pm 

    Did I suggest anything else?

  38. supremacist muzzies jerk on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 7:14 pm 

    supertard when we were younger we fight about women. are you going to keep fighting about nothing until you’re near death like supertard makati1? that’s why i proposed to be a Nixon going to china and promote peace. I also thanked you for exceeding my goal of defending supertard america. you can rest.
    i propose supertard scott meredith’s ahimsa philosophy or libertarian NAP.
    let’s as have non muzzie type inner strugle (kinda weird how muzzie allah acbard and self detonate, i thought inner struggle is putting hand on my head in the morning to think about things trying to make it better)
    we do it for supertard jay hanson, may (((supremetard))) receive his soul.

  39. supremacist muzzies jerk on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 7:30 pm 

    muzzie master plan
    https://jihadintel.meforum.org/190/islamic-state-masterplan

    link has lots of info for tard research on muzzies

  40. supremacist muzzies jerk on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 7:35 pm 

    MIT scrubbed all mention of muzzie inner struggle against ofc. sean collier
    https://annualfund.mit.edu/collierfund/

  41. supremacist muzzies jerk on Sat, 26th Oct 2019 8:09 pm 

    Muzzie akbar sayeed abused whitey supertard
    Whitey supertard killed self
    College and professors love muzzie 1000000x
    Not a word about fast tracking muzzie into muzzie anti rape machine muzzie amputation machine muzzie hamster machine.
    All pure muzzie love
    Muzzie used language consistent with treatment of supremacist muzzie toward non muzzie. Whitey supertard didn’t understand why so killed self. What a waste of life should’d bash the pee sitting down muzzie instead. It holds up the bathroom line causing supertard to have bladder infection

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