Register

Peak Oil is You


Donate Bitcoins ;-) or Paypal :-)


Page added on February 10, 2019

Bookmark and Share

The U.S. Faces A Catastrophic Food Supply Crisis In America As Farmers Struggle

The U.S. Faces A Catastrophic Food Supply Crisis In America As Farmers Struggle thumbnail

American farmers are battling several issues when it comes to producing our food.  Regulated low prices, tariffs, and the inability to export have all cut into the salaries of farmers.  They are officially in crisis mode, just like the United States’ food supply.

“The farm economy’s in pretty tough shape,” said John Newton, chief economist at the American Farm Bureau Federation.

“When you look out on the horizon of things to come, you start to see some cracks.”

Average farm income has fallen to near 15-year lows under president Donald Trump’s policies, and in some areas of the country, farm bankruptcies are soaring.  And with slightly higher interest rates, many don’t see borrowing more money as an option.  “A lot of farmers are going to give the president the benefit of the doubt, and have to date. But the longer the trade war goes on, the more that dynamic changes,” said Brian Kuehl, executive director of Farmers for Free Trade, according to Politico.

With no end to the disastrous trade war in sight, many farmers have traveled to Washington to share their plights with the president himself hoping that he’ll end the trade war that’s exacerbating an already precarious food crisis.  Farmers make up a fairly large chunk of president Trump’s base, and an unwillingness to put food production in the United States first could be detrimental for Trump reelection chances in 2020. It could also be the beginning of a catastrophic food shortage.

The Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis warned back in November of rising Chapter 12 bankruptcies used by family farmers to restructure massive amounts of debt. The Fed said that the strain of low commodity prices “is starting to show up not just in bottom-line profitability, but in simple viability.” The increase in bankruptcies was driven by woes in Wisconsin’s dairy sector, which shrunk by about 1,200 operations, or 13 percent, from 2016 to October 2018.

“You’ve had farms that have gone out of business, that have gone bankrupt because of this trade war,” said Kuehl of Farmers for Free Trade.

“There’s a lot of farmers going through tough conversations right now with their lenders.”

And so far, the government’s solution to the problem they created is to give more welfare to farmers, placing the burden on the backs of taxpayers.

As the government continues to pass the burden onto others while destroying the food industry, things could very well reach apocalyptic levels.  Nothing will see this country spiral into complete disarray like a lack of food. Alarmingly, scientists have already said that the global food supply system is broken.

To put it simply, government interference in the agriculture industry is responsible for the food crisis we all are about to face.

SHTFplan.com



150 Comments on "The U.S. Faces A Catastrophic Food Supply Crisis In America As Farmers Struggle"

  1. Cloggie on Tue, 12th Feb 2019 2:45 pm 

    This is not realistic, even with dirt cheap solar power, which may not be sustainable.

    That 1.32 euro/kg was a “base price”, for hydrogen produced and located in the Sahara. I have no illusion that prices on European markets will even come close to that: transport, trade margins and of course taxes of all sorts must be added.

    And why would solar power not be “sustainable”?

    Panels are getting ever more durable. Degradation rates of 0.3%/year have been achieved… After 25 years the better panels still produce 82.5% of the original output. Energy payback time 6 months (2010):

    https://news.energysage.com/how-long-do-solar-panels-last/

    Most experts expect PEM to win the race for prominence:

    Technology 2: Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Cells. Full scale unit cost averaged at $2100/kWe in 2015 and was projected to be $800/kWe by 2030.

    That $2100/kW is no longer valid in 2019. It is now below $1000:

    https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0360319917339435-gr3.jpg

    …and going in the direction of $500/kW for very large volumes (100 MW or more) by 2024 (figures as presented by ITM-UK at the last Hannover Messe). Other experts say:

    https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0360319917339435-gr4.jpg

    Compared to the cost of generating electricity with solar and wind, the cost of converting that electricity in hydrogen per electrolysis is rather small, less than a cent per kWh, excluding temperature and pressure.

    Life time expectation PEM by experts for 2030: 80,000 hours:

    https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0360319917339435-gr5_lrg.jpg

    Several links above from this source:

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360319917339435

    Make safety copy here first, not finished yet…

  2. Cloggie on Tue, 12th Feb 2019 2:56 pm 

    Efficiency, from the same source:

    https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0360319917339435-fx3_lrg.jpg

    2030, PEM… experts estimate:

    4.7 kWh/m3.

    1 m3 = 0.08 kg

    so 1 kilo is x 12.5 = 59 kWh system energy input for 39 kWh chemical energy output.

    “System energy” I guess means all included, including heat and pumping.

    So in Dubai we are talking 59 solar kWh * 2.4 cent/kWh = 1.41 euro per kilo hydrogen, by 2030 in large industrial volumes.

    Somewhat related to the above, I made a first exploratory post about how NaBH4 is produced:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2019/02/12/production-of-nabh4/

  3. Davy on Tue, 12th Feb 2019 3:27 pm 

    “Energy payback time 6 months”

    That’s a bullshit figure. I can attest to that from my own experience.

  4. Cloggie on Tue, 12th Feb 2019 4:00 pm 

    “That’s a bullshit figure. I can attest to that from my own experience.”

    You cannot tell from “your own experience”. Elaborate and predictably get twisted in your knickers.

    2012:

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/engineering/energy-payback-time

    “Recent reports have indicated that most thin-film technologies may have advantages over wafer Si in the EPBT criteria, with some thin-film PV module technologies (i.e., CdTe) demonstrating EPBTs of between 6 months and 1 year [54, 56].”

    Now is 2019.

  5. Cloggie on Tue, 12th Feb 2019 4:09 pm 

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236017541_Solar_cells_with_one-day_energy_payback_for_the_factories_of_the_future

    “Solar cells with one-day energy payback for the factories of the future“

    (polymer solar cell)

  6. Davy on Tue, 12th Feb 2019 4:40 pm 

    “EPBTs of between 6 months and 1 year”

    Now, into the real world. How about explaining the payback of the total cost of the installed panels in a average setting with an average yearly sun profile. I gathered 5KW today with my panels. I am lucky on a really good day in the summer with my A/C going to do 12KW. Do the math. This month has been horrible for solar gathering. Six panels were $1500. The total cost of system with the additional costs of batteries, inverter, charger controller, pole mount wires, concrete, and installation was $15,500. The payoff is way down the road for that, clogged. The reason I bring this up is you are always throwing numbers around and they are always the most attractive.

  7. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 12:23 am 

    Now, into the real world. How about explaining the payback of the total cost of the installed panels

    You should put on your glasses, empire dave. I wasn’t talking about financial payback time (the only category you are interested in), but in ENERGY PAYBACK TIME. EROI.

    In other words: how many months must a panel produce electricity in order to compensate for the energy required to build the damned panel in the first place.

    Perhaps 6 months was a little too optimistic, make it 1 year at current technology. Especially in Missouri, where radiation is very intense, something like 5200 as compare to 3500 in UK, Holland and Germany.

    But there is new thin film solar technology in the pipeline where EROI is irrelevant. My own hometown is a front runner in that respect:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2017/11/22/printing-solar-cells/

    (I work virtually next to it).

    They are also working on polymer solar films, of which energy payback time is in a matter of days:

    https://www.avans.nl/onderzoek/expertisecentra/technische-innovatie/lectoraten/solar-productietechnologie-en-equipmentontwikkeling/nieuws/2016/06/project-sepac

    There.is.no.energy.problem.

  8. makati1 on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 1:47 am 

    Cloggie, does that include the installation energy costs, the batteries, the transformer, etc? How about the delivery energy costs? And then there is the mining and refining of the materials and manufacturing the individual parts and transporting them to be assembled. Then shipping to the stores, etc. Not to mention ongoing maintenance and replacement.

    ALL renewables, other than plant fueled muscle power, are an energy sink requiring FFs to exist.

  9. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 3:34 am 

    @mak, yes.

    In grey, rainy Holland, the annual solar radiation on every m2 is 976 kWh.

    1 kWh is a hard days work:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2012/11/09/one-kilowatthour/

    With the latest thin film solar you can convert 20% or 200 kWh in electricity..

    Regarding your question, answers here:

    https://greenchemuoft.wordpress.com/2017/12/12/embodied-energy-and-solar-cells/

  10. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 3:46 am 

    Note, the embodied energie figures in the wordpress link refer to roof top installation. In required energy for a solar park are dramatically lower.

    Panel 120
    Module 190
    Support 150

    Total 460 kWh/m2
    Lifetime yield 6000 kwh/m2
    EROI 13

    With thin film no module.
    With cheap polymer thin film you can roll out like carpet on a hard desert floor.
    Is fine

  11. Antius on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 4:58 am 

    “Note, the embodied energie figures in the wordpress link refer to roof top installation. In required energy for a solar park are dramatically lower.
    Panel 120
    Module 190
    Support 150
    Total 460 kWh/m2
    Lifetime yield 6000 kwh/m2
    EROI 13

    With thin film no module.
    With cheap polymer thin film you can roll out like carpet on a hard desert floor.
    Is fine”

    Thin film obviously does require a module, glass cover and supporting structure. It has the advantage that less PV material is needed, which drives down capital cost. The disadvantage is lower efficiency and higher decline rates. There are pros and cons with everything. Because short-term electricity costs from PV are dominated by capital cost; thin-film does look better.

    An EROI of 13 on the face of it is mediocre. In any practical analysis, EROI needs to account for the cost of buffering the intermittent power supply. Not an easy assessment. It will always exert a downward influence on the whole system EROI. It is an issue for every energy source that we might choose, even things like hydro and nuclear, as all energy sources have downtime for various reasons. But the problem is clearly more acute for intermittent energy sources with low capacity factor and it pushes up whole system costs in a way that simple LCOE studies do not allude to.

    In terms of its real applicability to the economics of human systems, EROI needs to be adjusted to account for the rate of energy return within a given investment window. Hydroelectric and nuclear projects show a far more impressive EROI than PV or wind, but they generally do so over a very long time period: 40-80 years for hydro; nuclear is much the same. One of the advantages that wind and solar projects have over other developments is that they can be commissioned quickly – periods of months to a few years. Even though capital cost per average kW is fairly high and EROI is mediocre; the rate of return in the first five years is good and hence the economics of the projects are passable. The situation gets more complicated when back-up and storage are brought into the equation.

    When adjustments are made to account for the real rate of return of energy from an initial energy investment; the EROI calculation begins to line up far more closely with economic performance. One of the reasons that energy from new nuclear power reactors is relatively expensive, are that atrophy of supply chains have pushed up lead times and capital costs; and regulatory requirements creep have pushed up build times. New designs are also more complex due to the need for passive safety features. So the ‘rate of return EROI’ for new nuclear is mediocre in the first twenty years and the long build times mean that it could actually be zero in the first ten years; even though whole life EROI is relatively good. Large hydro projects face similar constraints, in addition to a dearth of resources in the form of untapped rivers.

    In the long-term, the cost of energy from a power source begins to line up with whole systems EROI, as capital and commissioning costs are paid off.

  12. Davy on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 5:22 am 

    “You should put on your glasses, empire dave. I wasn’t talking about financial payback time (the only category you are interested in), but in ENERGY PAYBACK TIME. EROI.”
    I saw what you posted clog and you posted it as if it was a financial payback. If you will go back to your comment you will see it was one sentence without clarification. I think maybe in your brain you think EPBT payback is a financial payback for propaganda reasons. Your comments are always way too rosy. EPBT is not the real world just like EROI. This is why if you are a business you don’t use these values as the reason to invest or not. They are useful for people that are concerned with the viability of our energy dominated civilization. It is useful for comparing civilizations not panels and a lumps of coal to invest in.

    “There.is.no.energy.problem.”
    There is an energy problem because there is systematic problems with civilization that energy is part of. The cost of energy to maintain the status quo of consumption and population growth is too high. If we were at 1BIL people and had this technology and some kind of economy that could produce these marvelous technologies it might be different. Civilization is in an energy trap. We may learn to live with the trap in a gradient of decline if behavior changes and the tech improves. We are not getting out of this trap of our own making not with populations at the level they are at and the behavior of these populations in overshoot.

  13. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 6:20 am 

    @Antius – EROI 13 is mediocre but refers to your standard inefficient NW-Europe rooftop installation with heavy 30 kg panels.

    Have a look at this 24 sec video:

    https://youtu.be/EsfFKTGwnrw

    Imagine thin film solar installed like a curtain on lightweight rail systems. The “curtains” can be “opened” in case of strong winds with lightweight servo’s and thin wire. Expect a big boost in EROI.

  14. Antius on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 6:22 am 

    “I saw what you posted clog and you posted it as if it was a financial payback. If you will go back to your comment you will see it was one sentence without clarification. I think maybe in your brain you think EPBT payback is a financial payback for propaganda reasons. Your comments are always way too rosy. EPBT is not the real world just like EROI. This is why if you are a business you don’t use these values as the reason to invest or not. They are useful for people that are concerned with the viability of our energy dominated civilization. It is useful for comparing civilizations not panels and a lumps of coal to invest in.”

    Davy, you are partially correct in that energy payback time is usually calculated as the inverse of EROI and does not account for build and commissioning time. In the real world, the rate at which energy is returned is just as important as the total amount returned on investment. Both will impact the cost of power.

    The cost of capital is very important too. If interest rates minus inflation were actually in positive territory, it is less likely that we would be building very many solar, wind or nuclear power plants at present. On the face of things, it would appear we would be building a lot of combined cycle gas turbine plants. Then again, the natural gas supply situation would not be what it is if low interest rates and low bond rates had not permitted the shale binge. The point is that a different interest rate environment would dramatically change the dynamics of the energy industry.

    I also believe that EROI for real projects is likely to be a curve rather than a single value. The EROI is strongly scale dependant and will be dependent upon institutional decisions that may affect build times for energy sources. In France between the 1960s and early 1990s; there was a strong drive for nuclear power and a regulatory regime allowed quite rapid build time for nuclear reactors. The way the French delivered their programme had a very favourable impact on both finances and EROI of nuclear projects because: (1) They established domestic supply chains; (2)…For a common safe reactor design and; (3)…They constructed these rapidly; (4) …with minimal labour costs associated with safety cases and downstream safety analysis, which was front end loaded.

    The French way of doing business meant that supply chains enjoyed economy of scale that allowed energy investments in these to achieve good and rapid payback. The common design was essential to achieving this. Rapid build time meant that rate of return of energy was good and the front end loading of safety analysis for the design, meant minimal labour (which implies embodied energy) associated with downstream safety cases. The result was that the French were able to achieve some of the lowest baseload power production costs of any nation in Europe. EROI studies never properly capture these sorts of effects; they tend to look at the energy embodied in the materials of the plant, rather than embodied energy of upstream supply chains and their equipment.

    If the British and the US were serious about a new nuclear revival, they would do things in the same way as the French did in the 1970s and 1980s. The fact that this is not happening, demonstrates that they either do not understand the cost drivers involved or are not serious about the need for low cost energy as a driver for future prosperity. I suspect that it is a little bit of both. These people think that the economy runs on money. They do not appreciate that the real economy is an energy system. This is the crux of the economic problems that we suffer to this day and why real returns on capital are practically zero.

    Solar PV and wind power also follow EROI curves that depend upon the energy investments in and health of supply chains, production scales and the friendliness of the regulatory environment. The fact that they are simpler technologies is beneficial in reaching workable EROI at lower production volumes than nuclear. But their lower power density means that the ceiling of EROI and ‘rate of return EROI’; are both lower than nuclear power would be under more ideal conditions.

    The key lesson is that it is possible to artificially enhance or destroy an energy source by screwing with the cost of capital; the economy of scale of supply chains; build times and the regulatory environment. But even under optimal conditions, these energy sources have EROI ceiling that depends on their physical characteristics. For nuclear energy, we are a long way from the EROI ceiling, for various reasons. For wind and solar; I suspect we are much closer and there are limits to how much further we can push the overall energy return of these sources at a societal level. The outcome of this little experiment is not trivial for any of us.

  15. Antius on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 6:38 am 

    “@Antius – EROI 13 is mediocre but refers to your standard inefficient NW-Europe rooftop installation with heavy 30 kg panels.
    Have a look at this 24 sec video:
    https://youtu.be/EsfFKTGwnrw
    Imagine thin film solar installed like a curtain on lightweight rail systems. The “curtains” can be “opened” in case of strong winds with lightweight servo’s and thin wire. Expect a big boost in EROI.”

    Impressive tech. In much the same way, it was possible in previous eras to adjust sails on windmills and ships according to wind conditions.

    Maybe it will work. The problem is that you are building complexity into something whose strength is its simplicity. Suddenly panels must be flexible and capable of rolling up hundreds or thousands of times in their lifetime without damage; and fitted with mechanical systems that respond reliably to the weather. I would also point out that there are limits to how thin a solar module can be, as the substrate needs to be thick enough to absorb mechanical stresses and carry low voltage DC without excessive resistance losses. The idea of micron thin solar cells only really works for very small scale systems.

  16. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 7:08 am 

    So far innovation drive was mostly directed at increasing solar-electricity conversion efficiency. Nobody paid much attention to optmizing production technology and reducing energy inputs.

    We are nowhere near the end of possibilities with pv:

    https://www.titech.ac.jp/english/news/2018/040859.html

    Massive gains are still possible.

  17. Antius on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 7:49 am 

    “So far innovation drive was mostly directed at increasing solar-electricity conversion efficiency. Nobody paid much attention to optmizing production technology and reducing energy inputs.”

    I doubt that very much. In terms of process equipment, capital cost and embodied energy are very much proportional to size. Operational energy costs are something that detracts directly from the bottom line of manufacturers and will be very much a factor during design stage. There may still be room for improvement, as there is across industry, but it is unlikely that solar PV and wind turbine manufactures have been especially remiss so far in this regard. This would put them at odds with the rest of industry.

    “We are nowhere near the end of possibilities with pv:
    https://www.titech.ac.jp/english/news/2018/040859.html
    Massive gains are still possible.”

    Maybe, maybe not. I enjoy reading your work Cloggie, but something that I have noticed about your prognostication is that you don’t seem to be very objective. You tend to cherry pick information that supports your prejudices and all assumptions are on the up side. The recent discussion on electrolysis is a good example. Looking at capital cost projections for 2020 made a few years ago, you looked at the range of predicted costs, picked the lowest one on the range and declared that it was so. Problem solved. That might make you feel better; but it doesn’t really help you reach a balanced opinion of what is likely or possible.

  18. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 9:24 am 

    The EU looks like the Soviet Union in 1991 – on the verge of collapse -Soros

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/12/eu-soviet-union-european-elections-george-soros

  19. Davy on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 10:23 am 

    Soros is a failed octarian soon to be in the grave. He cannot be trusted as a source for any outcome. His advice is only goal seeking his agenda and that agenda is corrupt and disgusting.

  20. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 10:25 am 

    Soros sounds just like me! Great minds think alike!

    Bye Bye Europe!

    And boy are they laughing it up on Trump reddit..So much for Clogg white movement to join europe..

    LOL

  21. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 10:27 am 

    Davy

    Soros is one of the most success people that have ever lived..One of the great investors ever..

    He is everything you aren’t..

    LOL

  22. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 10:28 am 

    Davy

    If Soros is going to be in the grave soon he has no reason to lie..

    You dumbass..Learn logic

  23. Duncan Idaho on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 10:29 am 

    Our winpawn friends should love Soros–
    He has lots of money!
    Don’t know their problem– maybe envy?

  24. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 12:23 pm 

    Soros is one of the most success people that have ever lived..One of the great investors ever..

    He is everything you aren’t..

    Tribal sentiment in action. Ethnocentrism pure.

    Normally mobster wants to rape and kill (white) rich people. But his hero Soros is a “great investor”.

    Pure hypocrisy.

  25. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 12:24 pm 

    Ilhan Omar is right about the influence of the Israel lobby

    Don’t do this to yourself, mobster.
    Lame attempt at identity hiding.

  26. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 12:45 pm 

    Clogg

    You know how North Korea turned into a slave state? they lost most of their oil shipments when the USSR collapsed..

    I see Europe going the same direction soon when their oil shortage hits.

    Your future is hard labor for some ration food..

    LOL

  27. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 12:47 pm 

    Clogg

    They are laughing it up on the Trump page on reddit about Soros article..

    They love the idea of Europe collapsing..

    So much for your great white movement huh?

  28. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 1:32 pm 

    They love the idea of Europe collapsing..
    So much for your great white movement huh?

    I have absolutely no illusions about Anglos. Worst enemy. Deeply anti-white. Fill mass of Greater Zion. If they are lucky, fill mass of European civilization. If US whitey revolts, a big if, than we take 100 million max. Too much trash like you.

    Just on the German news: German government contemplates nuclear armament. No decision yet. Only a matter of time.

    http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2018/08/why-germany-is-talking-about-getting-its-own-nuclear-weapons.html

    If no-deal Brexit happens, massive European armament will follow to develop an iron fist. No stupid navy (New Silk Road!), subs and missiles. End NATO. Trump wants us to rearm (because he expects CW2), no worries, we will.

  29. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 1:51 pm 

    CLogg

    Your region is going to collapse when the oil shortage hits..There is no way around it..

    I suggest you run for the hills before it’s too late..

    That German Army peak oil study already predicted the future in the rise of nationalism and extremism..Do you really want to bet against them on their conclusions about the upcoming oil shortage?

    And keep in mind if you bet against them and you lose, you will pay for it with your life..So the stakes couldn’t be higher!

    Choose wisely!

    LOL

  30. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 3:21 pm 

    “Your region is going to collapse when the oil shortage hits..There is no way around it..”

    Wishful thinking. Back to reality…

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/monica-witt-iran-spy-indicted-us-air-force-officer-defects-national-security-a8777761.html

    “Monica Witt: US Air Force officer defects to Iran with information ‘seriously damaging’ to national security, officials reveal”

    A US Air Force officer has defected to Iran and shared information that could cause “serious damage” to America’s national security, officials have revealed.

    Morphosis:

    https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/190213120148-monica-witt-split-large-169.jpg

  31. Antius on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 3:22 pm 

    “Just on the German news: German government contemplates nuclear armament. No decision yet. Only a matter of time.”

    That is hilarious! A country that sinks countless billions of Euros into renewable energy, in an attempt to eliminate the small possibility of a nuclear accident; is now developing nuclear weapons, which are specifically designed to cause nuclear disaster on a scale that makes Chernobyl look like a wet firecracker! I wonder sometimes how the German economy managed to survive the geniuses that have done everything in their power to sink it.

  32. Antius on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 3:44 pm 

    “Your region is going to collapse when the oil shortage hits..There is no way around it..”

    Wishful thinking. Back to reality…”

    You do have to wonder, what kind of necrophiliac freak would ‘wish’ for the collapse of the cradle of civilization, with all the death and misery that that would cause. Our very own mobster, apparently!

    I became interested in peak oil, partly out of desire to harness its political consequences; but most of all to look for opportunities to mitigate it. Evidently, not everyone here has the same motivation.

  33. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 3:50 pm 

    Antius

    Some men just want to watch the world burn!

  34. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 3:54 pm 

    Antius

    See, their morals, their code… it’s a bad joke. Dropped at the first sign of trouble. They’re only as good as the world allows them to be.

    I’ll show you, when the chips are down, these… these civilized people? They’ll eat each other.

    See, I’m not a monster, I’m just ahead of the curve.

  35. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 3:55 pm 

    Introduce a little anarchy!!!

    Upset the established order, and everything becomes chaos. I’m an agent of chaos. Oh, and you know the thing about chaos? It’s fair!

  36. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 4:18 pm 

    German 20:00 News tonight:

    https://www.tagesschau.de/multimedia/sendung/ts-29901.html

    At [6:17] the German defense minister (via narrator) suggest (low-key) that Germany “could contemplate” nukes of its own, but nothing has been decided yet.

  37. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 4:58 pm 

    BBC Newsnight now: conference call Ford leadership and PM May earlier today, stressing the seriousness of the siruation. General complaint UK business that politics is not taking no-deal Brexit serious enough.

  38. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 7:23 pm 

    Makes ya think

    https://i.redd.it/e0akjonmucg21.jpg

    Literally white genocide!

    LOL

  39. I AM THE MOB on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 8:32 pm 

    Will Central Bank Policies Set off Another Global Financial Crisis?

    http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/how-central-bankers-rigged-the-world/

  40. Cloggie on Wed, 13th Feb 2019 11:16 pm 

    Makes ya think
    https://i.redd.it/e0akjonmucg21.jpg
    Literally white genocide!
    LOL

    Yep, that’s the program mobster and his kosher tribe have in store for Anglo whitey: intentional passive genocide by unleashing ever larger numbers of non-white’s against them, all the while glorifying darkey in Hollywood grammy award sessions. And women, programmed to go with winners and conquerors, judge that Anglo white males are losers (a correct assessment) and they defect from their own genes, spread their legs and negrify. And the kikes get what they want: a passive mulatto herd without sense of identity or ethnic pride, repeating all the empty phrases the kikes put in their brains via their media like “racism!” and “natzi!”.

    The good thing for Europe is that a receding white America also implies a receding level of white competence. An America descending into third world status represents an ever smaller threat for Europe, the kikes own an ever smaller stick with which they can (or can’t rather) hit the rest of the world with. Exit NWO. The kikes “win”… by shooting an own goal.

    Anglo-Zionism… the sun sets in the West.
    Eurasia is next.

  41. I AM THE MOB on Thu, 14th Feb 2019 5:20 am 

    Zerohedge is now opening shilling for billionaire elites!

    Billionaires Already Gave Their “Fair Share”

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-02-13/billionaires-already-gave-their-fair-share

    Don’t people on the right ever get tired of being the elites useful idiots?

    When Lenin coined that term I think he was specifically thinking about conservatives..

  42. I AM THE MOB on Thu, 14th Feb 2019 5:22 am 

    Clogg

    You should focus on your own region..And massive austerity is coming to your country..I hope you dont rely on government assistance..

  43. Cloggie on Thu, 14th Feb 2019 5:40 am 

    “I hope you dont rely on government assistance..”

    My net worth is now €500k

    As an ideological “die broker” my only worry is if I have enough time left to spend it all, not in the least because I expect to rouble my net worth betore I turn 70. I like high tech and will continue doing it until I drop dead, hopefully surpasing my father, who got 88. I want to get old like this guy:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2018/10/23/pumped-hydro-storage-for-flatlanders/

    Die broke:

    https://www.amazon.com/Die-Broke-Radical-Four-Part-Financial/dp/0887309429

  44. I AM THE MOB on Thu, 14th Feb 2019 8:31 am 

    Europe’s Middle Class Is Shrinking. Spain Bears Much of the Pain.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/14/business/spain-europe-middle-class.html

    You are seeing the fall of Europe in real time!

    LOL

  45. I AM THE MOB on Thu, 14th Feb 2019 8:37 am 

    Clogg

    Im telling ya those government benefits are going to axed soon..Your country will be out of gas real soon..And Europe will have imploded

    What the odds someone who reads the daily mail and inforwars has the kind of money you claim?

    You are scum of white people..

    And too bad the tech industry was created by far left liberals..

    Only thing conservatives create is Wal Mart

    LOL

  46. I AM THE MOB on Thu, 14th Feb 2019 10:29 am 

    Happy Valentines day to all the incels on peakoildotcom..

    The one thing clog, Davy, and Mak all have in common..None of them are getting laid tonight..

    HAHHA!

  47. Davy on Thu, 14th Feb 2019 11:37 am 

    Got some last night MOB. Beat you to it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *