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Page added on March 30, 2019

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World Futures: Electricity And Other Energy

Alternative Energy
In part three of this series we finished by implying that solar power would be insufficient to meet the energy needs and that nuclear is an alternative in the quest to eliminate dependence on fossil fuels.
If this is an unacceptable approach, then the lifestyle and organization of humanity will require significant changes. A good question is why?
Using the United States as an example, the country has a total of 2.3 billion acres of land. Of this, 6.1 percent is developed land or rural residential land, 15.2 percent is crop land, 34.3 percent is range and pasture land, and 32.3 percent is forest land.
If you do the calculations, this leaves 0.277 billion acres unaccounted for and solar acreage only requiring 0.147 billion acres, not including gasoline replacement electricity. Seems very obvious – let us go solar now! Nuclear is not needed. Or is it?
In 1798, English cleric and scholar Thomas Malthus published An Essay on the Principle of Population. He was concerned about the exponential growth of the population, the linear growth of agriculture and that humanity, as then known, would run out of food.
He predicted that the world population would double every 25 years. In 1800, the estimated population was one billion people. If Malthus had been correct, today’s population would be about 217 billion. Comparing it to today’s real estimated population of 7.7 billion, the error of Malthus’ projection model is apparent. But we have to cut Malthus a little slack because he did not have a smart phone.
The point of this observation is that we cannot predict the future highly accurately, especially changes in the environment and the evolution of humanity. If one does a superficial observation of previous predictions about the future of earth and humanity one finds several, if not lots, of predictions of near-term extinction.
In my observation of these predictions, they do not accurately account for the factor of time and the growth of technology. More importantly, they seem to embrace a preservation of the current way of life. What changes is humanity willing to make to adapt to a new way of life?
Some examples are appropriate. China has 2.371 billion acres of land, a population of 1.386 billion people, and uses 6.2 trillion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity per year.
The numbers for India ate 0.812 billion acres, 1.339 billion people, and 1.5 trillion kWh consumption per year.
For the United States, it is 2.3 billion acres, 0.327 billion people, and 3.95 trillion kWh.
Finally, for Senegal, the numbers are 0.0486 billion acres, 0.0159 billion people, and 0.0033 trillion kWh. In consumption of electricity per person, here are the numbers:
  • Country             kWh Consumed per person per year
  • China                4,475
  • India                  1,122
  • United States    12,071
  • Senegal             209
  • World                 2.674
In these numbers, the needed conversion from fossil fuels for transportation is not included. Moving to purely electricity-based transportation will require more solar and wind conversion.
Further, solar and wind farms cannot be close to or centered in the middle of populated areas. This means that the transmission line array, which causes small losses of power, must be reconstructed or routed. In short, conversion to solar and to a lesser extent wind requires a major transition that will take time.
It must be evolutionary, not revolutionary. Yet the demand to eliminate the use of fossil fuels, while debatable, is continually growing. In countries such as Senegal, new capability for capturing solar electricity can be accomplished as demand grows. But are countries such as China, India, and the United States, not to mention other post-developed countries, willing to adjust and adapt?
Converting to solar and wind makes sense for the long term existence of humanity. The resources on earth are limited when compared to the energy stream from the sun.
In the short term there is concern about climate change with much of the blame attributed to CO2 emissions from fossil fuels.
While this potentially can be remedied by going solar, it cannot occur quickly because of changes required in how humanity collectively lives and interacts. And, individually, what changes in the way of life are acceptable? Are you willing to do away with cell (smart) phones, air travel, personal commuting to work, imports from other continents, and on and on? On the other hand, if you live in Senegal, is an improvement in your way of life wanted?
The transition to complete dependence on solar energy can happen with advances in technology, evolutionary changes in our way of life, and the time required for it to happen.
But if one wants to eliminate, at least reduce, CO2 emissions in the short term, and alternate source of energy is needed during the transition. Nuclear can do this and, in my not so humble opinion, is the only way to accomplish the mission.
It is not a “forever” solution and we need to continue the pursuit of solar solutions.
Nuclear fuel, like fossil fuel, is limited in supply and the quest for solar must not stop. Yet if we want to “immediately” reduce CO2 emissions and gain time for solar evolution, we need to GO NUCLEAR.
Till next time….
ladailypost.com


33 Comments on "World Futures: Electricity And Other Energy"

  1. makati1 on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 7:47 pm 

    Interesting! As I keep saying the one who will be in the most pain when the SHTF is the US. The chart and stats above prove it. Three times the electric consumed by China per capita. Almost five times the world average. Thirteen times that of the Philippines.

    What will be affected the most in the Philippines? Cities! They will have the same problems as the US. But they will empty to family lands. The rural areas have little or no electric that is necessary. Key word: “necessary”. Yes, it will be more difficult, but manageable.

    What will be affected most in the US? EVERYTHING! When the electric stops in the US, everything stops. Turn off ALL electric for a month and see what happens. No gas at the pumps. No water. No light/heat/AC. No phone, internet, radio, TV. No refrigerator, hot water, etc. In the city, no elevators, hospitals, stores, ATMs, etc. Millions will die.

    An EMP, natural or man-made, would end the US. Renewable energy requires a grid and the US grid is antique. The US is bankrupt. Any massive renovation is out of the question. Good luck!

  2. Davy on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 7:55 pm 

    I plan on collecting animal farts to run my tractors to feed the animals. That’s what I call Real Green.

  3. Sum on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 9:34 pm 

    “I plan on collecting animal farts to run my tractors to feed the animals. That’s what I call Real Green.”

    You see, my friends, Supertard Davy is always on the cutting edge of REAL GREEN science, not like the rest of you fake green lyin’ libertard Democrats.

    You go girl!!!!!

  4. Davy-Sum Identity Theft on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 10:22 pm 

    Sum on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 9:34 pm:

    You see, my friends, Supertard Davy is always on the cutting edge of REAL GREEN science, not like the rest of you fake green lyin’ libertard Democrats.

    You go girl!!!!!

  5. Davy on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 11:53 pm 

    Thank you for your support, Sum. I am so REAL GREEN that I even use a home-made flatulence collector for my own gas. You can’t imagine my satisfaction as I brag to my fellow deplorables that my own farts pays for my pick-em-up truck trips to the Cuba, MO Wal Mart!!!!

    p.s. Whenever I hear one of my truckers or deplorable neighbors passing wind, I always ask if they will hold it until I can get the collector hooked-up, but the selfish SOBs never want to share.

  6. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 3:05 am 

    “Interesting! As I keep saying the one who will be in the most pain when the SHTF is the US.”
    The US will feel a lot of pain and is now with many segments of the population. The over populated areas in the world one of which makato lives in will see mass death from starvation. You can point to overconsumption as overshoot but overpopulation is just as bad. In the case of China and India with mega energy intensive cities it is the worst of both worlds.

    “The chart and stats above prove it. Three times the electric consumed by China per capita. Almost five times the world average. Thirteen times that of the Philippines.”
    The P’s has the GDP roughly of my State with 16 times the population. The land area is about double. That is overshoot makato. You have nothing to brag about other than being undeveloped if that is what you want to brag about.

    “What will be affected the most in the Philippines? Cities! They will have the same problems as the US. But they will empty to family lands. The rural areas have little or no electric that is necessary. Key word: “necessary”. Yes, it will be more difficult, but manageable.”
    Tell me where 20MIL from the Manila region are going makato? Well one thing is for sure they will show up in numbers at your place. Family land is not going to support these people. These cities are what supports these rural areas and makes their substance farming economic. You are an old man lost in a dementia induced fantasy.

  7. Not Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 3:07 am 

    Luantic JuanP activity

    Davy on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 7:55 pm
    Sum on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 9:34 pm
    Davy-Sum Identity Theft on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 10:22 pm
    Davy on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 11:53 pm

  8. Lunatic Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 3:29 am 

    Lunatic fringe Davy activity:

    Davy on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 7:55 pm
    Sum on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 9:34 pm
    Davy-Sum Identity Theft on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 10:22 pm
    Davy on Sat, 30th Mar 2019 11:53 pm

  9. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 3:53 am 

    This problem with energy is really a multifaceted problem related to other problems and predicaments. Humans are in an overshoot predicament. Nothing is going to change that except lowering our footprint and population levels. All the other various problems are related to this. Even if we get a handle on energy that is not enough. We are a long way from figuring out energy in regards to a modern global civilization and affluent lifestyles and a renewable transition. Even the world’s poor are living well compared to the way it could be without globalism and fossil fuels. It is readily apparent our fossil fuel usage is allowing 7BIL people. Without it we would need to be around 2BIL or less.

    I think all sources need to be promoted except maybe coal unless a low carbon process can be managed. Coal is just too dirty and environmentally disruptive in all its phases. The problem is we have not been able to grow alternative and continue a growth based economy and get off coal. We add more alternatives and gas but coal use is barely dropping in fact China is building multiple plants around the world as it tries to reduce its own coal use at home. So far we are stuck with dirty coal.

    It is likely we are not going to be able to get off fossil fuels completely especially as the worlds energy systems are transformed. Personally I don’t see a renewable energy transition but I do see a strong transformation that can buy us time. Maybe something will happen to lower out footprint and maintain a civilization. In the meantime we should harness all forms of energy except coal and hope for the best. This means we need to continue NUK. I don’t like NUK but I don’t see a way around leaving coal and also leaving NUK.

    Personally I think lifeboats and hospices are in order. At some point life is going to get painful and more deaths will have to occur by the necessity of the physics of overshoot. This is not an emotional point it is science. We are in overshoot and will have to get out of it. We can make this less bad. That is the hospice side of the equation. The hospice side means social support. Those who will be disenfranchised need to be given a bare minimum of support, somehow.

    The life boat side of the equation is building out resilient permaculture communities to help with a transition of what surely will be the end of our civilization as we know it. Industrial agriculture is dated. It has a shelf life. We will have to embrace an alternative way to feed ourselves. We can embrace a hybrid of the best of industrial agriculture and the old ways. This hybridization of food production can be incorporated into a modern permaculture arrangement that is more than just growing food it is really a way of life. Energy is part of this hybridization. We need to go back to the old use of biomass but also modern renewables. We will need more animal power. We can try to simplify some of these renewables instead of going high tech with everything. Most of all we need to localize and embrace seasonality and intermittency. The sad truth is we can’t do this with everyone so we will have to make ends meet with a muddle of what we have now and these life boat arrangements.

    Personally I don’t see the top doing much changing except being reactive to decline and localized collapse. This means the effort must fall to the individual and small community to change. This can be much like when immigrant groups of past times collected together in change. In their case it was religious persecution driving them to a new life. Now it is people recognizing their survivability requires them to live a different way of life. Our mega cities can never be supported by renewables but renewables have a place as we end out current way of life. Renewables can transform modern man away from fossil fuels for a time. Yet, they appear to be only a step to something far more transforming. They can help us in a greater darker transition into a future of a collapsing way of life that will be a journey to a new way of life. It also may be an extinction event, who knows. Humans are hopeful so we have to try.

  10. Cloggie on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 4:16 am 

    But if one wants to eliminate, at least reduce, CO2 emissions in the short term, and alternate source of energy is needed during the transition. Nuclear can do this and, in my not so humble opinion, is the only way to accomplish the mission.

    Rear-guard fight. You have to overcome to extremely negative PR nuclear energy has acquired after Three Miles Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima (and strongly related: Hiroshima and Nagasaki):

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2019/03/29/hbo-chernobyl/

    Furthermore it is ludicrous to assume that a nuclear infrastructure can be built faster than a renewable one. The incremental buildup in Europe is in full swing. Having a parallel nuclear trail would be a costly diversion. Currently renewable energy is the cheapest way to generate a kWh of electricity. Bottle neck is storage, but solutions are being developed and are near-market maturity:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2019/01/28/the-emerging-dutch-hydrogen-economy/

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2019/01/27/large-scale-hydrogen-project-in-the-works-in-belgium/

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2019/01/26/itm-power-upbeat-of-hydrogen-storage-market/

  11. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 4:27 am 

    “But if one wants to eliminate, at least reduce, CO2 emissions in the short term, and alternate source of energy is needed during the transition. Nuclear can do this and, in my not so humble opinion, is the only way to accomplish the mission.” “Rear-guard fight. You have to overcome to extremely negative PR nuclear energy has acquired Furthermore it is ludicrous to assume that a nuclear infrastructure can be built faster than a renewable one.”
    This is not about either or thing it is about a combination. NUK makes a great base load power provider. There is a variety of NUK possibilities from small to large with new kinds being experimented with.

    “The incremental buildup in Europe is in full swing. Having a parallel nuclear trail would be a costly diversion.”
    Maintaining the NUK resources we have is vital to building out renewables. Coal needs to be eliminate first.

    “Currently renewable energy is the cheapest way to generate a kWh of electricity. Bottle neck is storage, but solutions are being developed and are near-market maturity:”
    The bottle neck of storage is what makes renewables so costly. Renewables as an energy transition paradigm is still theory when we look at all forms of energy usage from transport to agriculture to the grid. The task is so large that NUK needs to be part of the mix at least in the beginning phase. What this means is we should avoid phasing out NUK and even have a modest build out where appropriate.

  12. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 4:30 am 

    “Hydrogen & co”

    I am excited about hydrogen but it is not a silver bullet. I could be a major piece of the puzzle but currently it is not commercialized to the point of impacting the energy transformation. It is years away from major impacts.

  13. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 4:45 am 

    “Cycling heaven: The African capital with ‘no traffic”
    https://tinyurl.com/y2a2k8fo BBC

    A combination of factors ranging from conflict to diplomatic isolation have unintentionally turned the Eritrean capital into a cycling paradise. Asmara only has about 500,000 inhabitants, which combined with low salaries, high import taxes and fuel shortages means the city has few vehicles. Those you do see often tend to be from a different age…As a result of its circumstances, Asmara offers a very different landscape compared to many African cities congested with traffic. This, combined with the wonderful climate, makes it a dream for cyclists to get around. “Cycling is part of our culture,” says a 25-year-old man…Asmara’s architecture is also admired and it was recently made a Unesco World Heritage Site for its striking art deco buildings, a legacy of the country’s time as an Italian colony from 1897 until 1943.

  14. Truth Buster on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 5:08 am 

    Did Davy’s inspiration for word salad originate from this great thinker:

    “I always say they came from the valleys. They came from the mountains, they came out of the damn rivers. I don’t know what you were doing in the river, but they came from the cities, they came and they came and they didn’t even know.” President Chump

  15. Cloggie on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 5:11 am 

    “Cycling heaven: The African capital with ‘no traffic”

    Africa is doing much better than most people think it does. The western public only gets to see pictures of disasters like now in Mozambique. But normality is quite different.

    Time to get rid of that African-aid syndrome.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/27/world/africa/kenya-obesity-diabetes.html

    https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/11/e017666

    https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2017/11/08/in-much-of-sub-saharan-africa-mobile-phones-are-more-common-than-access-to-electricity

  16. makati1 on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 5:11 am 

    Davy, the “20 million” (exaggeration) are going to go to the family farms and lands in the countryside. The Ps is like the US in the early 20th century. Mostly farms and rural families. Not like the US where there are generations living in the city/burbs and nowhere to go.

    My partner’s family owns lands all over Luzon. We get rice from them every year. The farm we are developing will probably be home to some of my partner’s family when the SHTF. We plan for it.

    Again, you have no idea what it is like here except the propaganda you read. You cannot accept that there are better places to live than the US, but there are. Many.

    You keep comparing apples to potatoes. The Ps is quite different than the US and better in so many ways with the collapse approaching. Ask the US farmers that have all of their farms underwater for this year how they are going to survive? Over 1,600 square miles of unproductive land this year and maybe for ever. You are going to find out how much food really costs and how not self sufficient the US food supply really is. The year is only beginning.

    ““Rural areas cover 97 percent of the nation’s land area but contain 19.3 percent of the population (about 60 million people),” Census Bureau Director John H. Thompson said.”

    https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2016/cb16-210.html

    That means that the US urban/suburban (sidewalk and lawns) population is about 80% or 250,000,000 people with no place to go when the SHTF. That is over TWO times the Ps total population. Who has the most food problems when the SHTF? Hint: Not the Philippines. LMAO?

  17. makati1 on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 5:23 am 

    “These cities are what supports these rural areas and makes their substance farming economic”

    “Definition of subsistence farming: farming or a system of farming that provides all or almost all the goods required by the farm family usually without any significant surplus for sale” M-W

    The farms supply the cities. So, instead of shipping it off for sale in the city, it will be consumed locally. The cities only consume. They do not produce. Fuck “economy”! No money required when you barter/trade. A day’s labor for a bushel of sweet potatoes. A foreign concept to spoiled Americans, but you will learn, or die.

    Your logic is as delusional as is all of your other bullshit. You have NO idea, Missouri Mule. No idea. You can only think in terms of $$$, not life. LOL

  18. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 5:57 am 

    “Black Hawk’s 11 Percent Solution”
    https://tinyurl.com/y448rxkz The Great Change

    “I reiterated, among other things, Growth, whether of material “wealth” or population, cannot be sustained and some serious degrowth is overdue. You can get as much from looking at the Baltic Exchange Dry Index or the Dow. If production cannot be decoupled from quality of life then we are chasing a paradox because we live on a finite planet of limited resources. There is good news in that at least some of our problems can be addressed by reversing climate change and building ecosystem health through a multitude of natural, antifragile and frugal means. However, none of these things are being done at any significant scale, and that scaling seems dangerously far off. We are poised at the edge of the Seneca Cliff and will need to find a better way down than leaping without a parachute.”

    “What I confirmed by reading Black Hawk’s account is the same as we might learn from any number of anthropology studies; that voluntary simplicity and gift economies provide for all, allow ample time for leisure, celebration, and sport, foster honesty and integrity as the highest social values, and encourage exploration of natural spiritual powers through deep observation, revelation, and clairvoyant dreaming. It is no worse than the lives we live now and in many ways better. This is why in the history of the American colonies those who switched sides and became Indians remained so, while Indians who tried out Western Civilization usually lasted only a short time in their strange surroundings before returning home.”

    “Most of us likely cannot conceive of how a society as complex and populous as modern techno-consumer culture could transition in a century or less to something resembling Black Hawk’s village. We take half measures, like installing renewable energy, supporting a Green New Deal or joining transition towns, which are steps along the path, but not nearly enough to get where we must go. Next week we will have a look at David Holmgren’s latest missive, the strategies of the Global Ecovillage Network and Ecosystem Restoration Camps, and how to adopt the most realistic patterns of living that can be sustained into a fragile, hazardous and uncertain future.”

  19. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 5:58 am 

    We may dismiss and even ridicule the above permaculture thinking but reality says at least some of this must be embraced. I say some of this in regards to parachute strategies of lifeboats and hospices. The nature of lifeboats and hospices does not need to be taken in the extreme just as collapse is nearly always mistaken in the extreme. Lifeboats and hospices are a strategy of mitigating and adapting to a collapse process that may be a longer term phenomena. It is very possible it could be short term but there is nothing that says it must. This is about the here and now and the next day not some far off future in 2050 or 2100.

    I have been a doomer and prepper now since 2000. I have studies climate change and peak oil since 85 in college. Even though peak oil story has change it is still relevant. Energy is still a dangerous problem and possibly a predicament. In any case a way of life is the real predicament. I have come to the conclusion that the individual and small communities can embrace the necessary change to find resilience and relative sustainability within the context of a collapsing globalism. This does not ensure survival but it does offer meaning. Meaning comes from making efforts at survival. Is this not what humans used to do before we become sedentary in modernism?

    This Real Green approach to a localized permaculture future revolves around the individual and small communities. It offers a blue print for change at the grass roots level. It acknowledges things like a Green New Deal are a waste of time. Maybe something good will come out of the so called Green New Deal but for the most part I see a wasted effort that could of used political capital in a more informed and focused fashion. This is the real failure of progressives and that is thinking they have the answers when they are part of the problem. All I see is more political maneuvering to shift resources that is just another wealth transfer exercise. The new deal is a new group who will benefit from free lunches. This is really about power not the environment. If it was really about the environment these people would be living differently.

    This is not about healing the planet. That is no longer possible. The damage has been done and the consequences are ahead. This is more about triage and stabilization. This is possible in small ways at the grass root level. The top is too noisy with different ideologies corrupted by power plays. The leadership of the world is dishonest and corrupted by affluence and power. This is the raw truth of it, plain and simple. This will not change until it ends. The top has been coopted by psychopathic tendencies of power politics which is deep human nature. It is the black hole of the ego. There is no way to change this. Corruption follows a process and we are in a late stage of it.

    When one realizes this predicament of human nature then they start where change can work and that is the local. This does not mean we should reject efforts at the top. We need efforts at the top but the point is these efforts will never make a difference with what is needed. The efforts at the top will be cancelled out by other wrong efforts. Let’s hope more good can come out of them is the best we can hope for. This means if you want to be part of real change that is green with relative resilience and sustainability look right in front of you. Quit expecting government to do it because they will not and cannot. A flawed and destructive way of life cannot be made right with renewables and vegan practices. Your life can be changed concentrate on that.

  20. JuanP on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 5:59 am 

    Truth Buster on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 5:08 am

    Wow, JuanP, you got two hours sleep. You are really burning the candle at both ends

  21. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 6:00 am 

    ‘Davy, the “20 million” (exaggeration)”

    Not at all an exaggeration makato. check this out:

    http://popdensitymap.ucoz.ru/news/47_population_density_administrative_boundaries_map_of_luzon_philippines/2014-08-13-59

  22. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 6:10 am 

    “These cities are what supports these rural areas and makes their substance farming economic” “Definition of subsistence farming: farming or a system of farming that provides all or almost all the goods required by the farm family usually without any significant surplus for sale” M-W”
    Makato, this is the 21st century and the P’s has 100MIL people which is conservatively 70MIL too many. The only way the P’s feeds itself whether subsistence or industrial agriculture is with a fossil fuel driven economy located in a globalized world. You are living in a delusional world of makato. Not only is your country a net food importer of the important basics of food and ag imputes, you are in a climate danger zone.

    “The farms supply the cities. So, instead of shipping it off for sale in the city, it will be consumed locally.”
    BS, makato, it is a two way street. You will need to figure out where all these people will go when or if SHTF. It will ruin the status quo in your P’s countryside and this will be little different than what will happen in the rich west in regards to a collapsing arrangement. Both places face a dangerous future if the lights go out.

    “The cities only consume. They do not produce. Fuck “economy”!”
    LOL, what a goofball. Go to bed makato you are sticking your foot in your mouth now.

    “No money required when you barter/trade. A day’s labor for a bushel of sweet potatoes. A foreign concept to spoiled Americans, but you will learn, or die.”
    LOL, yea for a few hundred people that are not a risk of being trampled by a stampede of hungry urbanites. Many you are living in a fantasy world.

    LOL, makato, I thought you said I didn’t debate??? LMFAO. I debated you under the table.

  23. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 8:31 am 

    I put the dumb in dumbass.

    dumbasses

  24. Not Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 8:51 am 

    JuanPee posting not Davy

    Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 8:31 am

  25. Sissyfuss on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 8:55 am 

    Davy, change will have to be forced upon us via various catastrophes. Our ability to deny and obfuscate is both strengths and deadly weaknesses. Our trajectory of overshoot cannot be redirected through will or epiphany. Keep building your ark because a deluge is coming.

  26. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 9:11 am 

    I am sis. I hope it floats

  27. Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 10:51 am 

    I am sis.

    HERE ME RORE!!!

  28. Robert Inget on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 10:51 am 

    Go no further than Venezuela. Just a few weeks w/o power and the entire economy collapses.

    Knock on effects of oil shortages have yet to be felt world/wide.

    “Just in Time Deliveries” get a first big test.

  29. Not Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 11:39 am 

    JuanPee posting not Davy

    Davy on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 10:51 am

  30. Cloggie on Sun, 31st Mar 2019 12:57 pm 

    The hydrogen economy of the Orkney Islands:

    https://deepresource.wordpress.com/2019/03/31/hydrogen-economy-in-the-orkney-islands/

  31. Davy on Mon, 1st Apr 2019 6:13 am 

    “South Africa’s electricity blackouts have become worryingly normal”
    https://tinyurl.com/y5r7n4fx qz dot com

    Africa’s most advanced economy has threatened to regress this past fortnight as rolling blackouts kept the country in the dark. The blackouts are scheduled and limited, affecting different areas at different times, in a process meant to convey some sort of stability, even as the national grid flounders. These organized power cuts are known as “loadshedding,” a term coined by the failing national power supplier itself. “Load shedding, or load reduction, is done countrywide as a controlled option to respond to unplanned events to protect the electricity power system from a total blackout,” according to Eskom’s official explanation.

    “But behind Eskom’s failures is a lack of political accountability for a grave economic loss. This latest round of blackouts have hurt small businesses and knocked investor confidence, taking South Africa further away from its goals as a middle-income country that offers an opportunity for all who live in it. Years of mismanagement and corruption meant that the two new stations built to lighten the load are malfunctioning and costing millions of dollars to repair. And like so many state-owned companies in South Africa, Eskom did not escape the influences of corruption.”

    “The country has looked to Venezuela as its worst nightmare. Stuck in darkness for several days, South Africans have been sharing videos and reports of the South American country’s epic blackouts. Venezuela’s grid has also collapsed, analysts say, due to neglect and political interference. Nigeria, where the hum of generators have become part of Lagos’ natural sound, is another cautionary tale. Like South Africa, Nigeria’s power grid has struggled to keep up with growing demand, making electricity supply the responsibility of individuals who can afford a generator. Nigerians on Twitter are warning South Africans not to let the situation get any worse.”

  32. Cloggie on Mon, 1st Apr 2019 7:10 am 

    SA is a society that no longer is run by Europeans but by Africans, with predictable results: blackouts (pun intended). No worries, this will come to the US as well.

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