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The week in energy: The nuclear threat

Alternative Energy

“A nuclear error” was one of the cataclysms that Joe Strummer imagined in the Clash anthem “London Calling”, written in the summer of 1979 with the Three Mile Island reactor accident still fresh in his mind. The nuclear error that the International Energy Agency sounded the alarm on this week was different, though: it is concerned that partly because of fears about safety, western countries are allowing or even forcing their ageing nuclear power plants to shut down, with serious consequences for greenhouse gas emissions and the cost of electricity.

At the Three Mile Island plant, although the Unit 2 reactor has been shut down since the accident, Unit 1 has been delivering low-carbon electricity steadily throughout the subsequent four decades. In the next four months that is set to come to an end, however: Exelon, the plant’s owner, said in 2017 that without policies from the US state of Pennsylvania to support it, Three Mile Island was not economically viable. On May 8 the company confirmed the final decision to shut it down in September.

The IEA this week published a report titled “Nuclear Power in a Clean Energy System”, its first on the industry for more than 20 years, because it is so concerned about the wave of nuclear plant closures across the developed world. Fatih Birol, the IEA’s executive director, described the outlook for nuclear as “the most urgent policy challenge today” for energy and the climate. Even after the boom in renewable energy over the past decade, nuclear power was still the largest source of low-carbon electricity in developed countries last year, by some distance, as this chart from the report shows.

Building new nuclear plants will help the transition to lower carbon sources of energy, the IEA says, but it acknowledges that the outlook is “highly uncertain”. The Chernobyl disaster of 1986, now being vividly recreated in a television drama series from HBO, put a brake on investment in new reactors in western countries for two decades, and then just as there was talk of a “nuclear renaissance” emerging in the 21st century, the Fukushima disaster of 2011 dealt another blow to public confidence. The IEA argues that the most important reason for the collapse of investor appetite for new nuclear plants in Europe and the US, however, has been the industry’s failure to deliver projects on time and on budget. At a time when the costs of renewable energy have been plunging, the cost of nuclear power has been soaring. The estimated cost of the EPR reactor that French utility EDF is building at Flamanville in Normandy, for example, has soared from €3bn to €11bn. François de Rugy, France’s environment minister, said this week that the start date for the reactor was still uncertain. Such stories are the rule rather than the exception for new nuclear plants built in Europe and the US over the past 15 years.

As a result, investing in new nuclear plants is very difficult for the private sector. Of 54 under construction worldwide today, 47 are being built by state-owned companies, and six of the seven in the private sector have price regulation in place to give them some certainty about their revenues. But beyond that, even keeping existing plants running is becoming increasingly difficult, whether because of policy decisions to shut them down, or because electricity market structures do not allow them to make enough money to cover their costs. Unless policies change, advanced economies could lose 25 per cent of their nuclear generation capacity by 2025, and two-thirds of it by 2040, the IEA warns.

Most of that lost capacity would probably be replaced by renewable generation, but Mr Birol argues it would make the transition to low-carbon energy more difficult, because wind and solar power and the transmission connections they need would be more expensive than keeping old reactors running. The experience in the US has been that retired nuclear plants have been replaced by a mix of wind, solar and gas-fired generation.

The IEA has modelled a scenario in which reactors in developed countries are allowed to shut down and are not replaced, called the “nuclear fade case”. In that scenario, cumulative carbon-dioxide emissions out to 2040 would be 5 per cent higher than in its new policies scenario, which takes account of current and planned policies including national commitments under the Paris climate agreement. In the sustainable development scenario, showing a possible path to meeting the Paris goal of keeping the increase in global temperatures to “well below” 2C, while delivering universal access to energy, nuclear power production in advanced economies actually rises a little.

The IEA suggests a range of policy measures for supporting nuclear power, including operating lifetime extensions from regulators, electricity market designs that reward nuclear plants for their advantages including high levels of availability, and payments that put nuclear on an even footing with renewable sources as low-carbon power. In practice, the blunt realities of energy politics have meant that moves to help nuclear power have not always played out in the best possible ways for curbing emissions. In the US, New York, Illinois and most recently New Jersey have put measures in place to support their nuclear plants. A similar plan is being debated in Pennsylvania, and although it has come too late for Three Mile Island, it could save the state’s other nuclear plants.

There have been vigorous arguments over all of these initiatives, but the most controversial of all has been the plan now moving through the legislature in Ohio, which links support for nuclear power to help for coal-fired plants and an attack on policies favouring renewables and energy efficiency. The state’s House of Representatives this week approved a bill that would create new payments for Ohio’s two nuclear plants, while cutting support for energy efficiency and scrapping the state’s mandated standard requiring 12.5 per cent of its generation to come from renewable sources by 2027. The legislation now goes to the state’s Senate.

The plan has won bipartisan support, but it has been a particularly critical issue for Ohio’s Republicans. A senior adviser to President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign has been urging state lawmakers to back the plan, because of the thousands of jobs that would be lost if the nuclear plants closed. “The message is that if we have these plants shut down we can’t get Trump re-elected,” a source told Politico.

In another example of how the changing energy landscape of the US has shaken up old enmities and alliances, the campaign against the bill has united environmentalists and the oil and gas industry. Neil Waggoner of the Sierra Club, the environmental group, described the legislation as “a farce” and “an absolute embarrassment for Ohio”. The American Petroleum Industry warned that customers would “pay the price” for the bill, and urged the state Senate to “protect Ohio taxpayers and reject this legislative bailout”.

Buyers still want Iranian oil

The Trump administration this week sent mixed signals on Iran. Mr Trump himself said he thought there was a chance that the US could reach a deal with Tehran over its nuclear programme, and emphasised that “we aren’t looking for regime change”. He said his objective was simply to prevent Iran acquiring nuclear weapons: the same goal that was embodied in the international agreement that the US withdrew from last year.

Meanwhile, John Bolton, Mr Trump’s national security adviser, has been ramping up the pressure on Iran, accusing it of having been behind the attacks earlier this month on four tankers off the coast of the United Arab Emirates and on oil pipeline facilities in Saudi Arabia. Talking to reporters in London, Mr Bolton said that soon, perhaps next week, he would be giving evidence to the UN Security Council to support his case. However, he rejected suggestions of differences with Mr Trump, saying: “The policy we are pursuing is not regime change. That is a fact and everyone should understand that.”

The administration has similarly tried to avoid ambiguity about its policy on Iran’s oil exports. The Wall Street Journal suggested there could be some limited flexibility in how sanctions would be applied against buyers of Iranian oil, but Brian Hook, the US special representative for Iran, issued a statement saying that was not the case. “Our firm policy is to completely zero out purchases of Iranian oil. Period,” he said.

However, some buyers of Iranian oil have seemed reluctant to fall into line with that strategy. India was reported to be looking at ways to evade US sanctions by paying in rupees, so it could continue buying Iranian oil. Livemint reported that India’s new government following the re-election of Narendra Modi as prime minister would need to make a quick decision on whether to defy the US by continuing imports. Kabir Taneja at Firstpost said the decision related to the Modi government’s broader thinking about India’s strategic autonomy and its position as “not an out-and-out ally of the US”.

Meanwhile, there is intense focus on the Liberian-registered tanker the Pacific Bravo, which the US has suggested is Chinese-owned. It appears to be carrying a cargo of Iranian oil, and industry sources have suggested it is likely to be heading to China. The US warned Hong Kong that offering any services to the tanker would be a breach of the sanctions, but the city’s government said it would ignore the threat. China reported a surge in imports of Iranian oil just before the sanctions waivers ended on May 2.

Beijing’s concerns about energy security have also been heightened by the escalating trade dispute with the US, and China’s state-controlled energy industry is being mobilised for an economic trial of strength that “might last for years”, Aibing Guo and Jasmine Ng of Bloomberg reported.

In brief

● A plan for a pioneering $1bn energy storage facility has been launched in Utah, intended to use low-cost or negative power to create hydrogen or compressed air, which can be stored in a huge underground salt cavern and then released to generate electricity as needed. (FT)

● A new international initiative for helping deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, backed by countries including Canada, the US and Japan, was launched at the Clean Energy Ministerial meeting in Vancouver. (CEM)

● President Donald Trump on Thursday evening surprised the markets with an announcement of threatened new tariffs on US imports from Mexico. The tariffs could push up the cost of US crude oil imports from Mexico, which are running at about 700,000 barrels a day. (FT)

● The US defence department wants funding to strengthen domestic production of rare earth minerals and reduce dependence on China. Developing alternative sources of supply will take time. (Reuters)

● Russia’s oil production has continued to fall, as the country’s exports have been hit by the contamination problem on the Druzhba pipeline to Europe. (Reuters)

● Renewable energy in Australia is on track to provide half the country’s electricity by 2030, even without any additional policy support. (SBS News)

● There has long been a debate over the effectiveness of carbon credits for saving forests. After a detailed in-depth investigation, Lisa Song of ProPublica concluded that they “may be worse than nothing”. She reported: “In case after case, I found that carbon credits hadn’t offset the amount of pollution they were supposed to, or they had brought gains that were quickly reversed or that couldn’t be accurately measured to begin with.” (ProPublica)

● US greenhouse gas emissions rose by 1.5-2.5 per cent last year, the Rhodium Group has estimated. The increase in carbon-dioxide emissions from energy was 2.7 per cent, a little less than the company had suggested in its preliminary estimate in January. (Rhodium Group)

● Exploration and production companies operating in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico are under pressure to grow bigger or be acquired, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas told the Financial Times. You can hear the full interview in an Alphachat podcast. His comments follow a suggestion in the Dallas Fed’s latest quarterly energy survey, from March, that there is a “consolidation party” coming for both E&P and service companies. Only 10 per cent of the leading US shale E&Ps are generating positive free cash flow, according to Rystad Energy. (FT, Dallas Fed, Oilfield Technology)

● On an island off New York that is closed to the public, the US defence department is running war games to prepare for cyber attacks on the power grid. (Business Insider)

● And finally, back to Joe Strummer. As described in Marcus Gray’s entertaining book, Route 19 Revisited, the energy crisis of the 1970s loomed large for Strummer as he was working on the London Calling album. In an interview with the NME in June 1979, he raised the question of Peak Oil, claiming that “there’s 10,000 days of oil left. It’s finite”. A great performer and songwriter; not such a great energy forecaster.

Other views

Nick Butler — Iraq faces a tough challenge in developing its potential (FT)

Anjli Raval and Josh Spero — Pollution: the race to clean up the shipping industry (FT)

Jamie Smyth — Renewable energy: Australia bets on a ‘water battery’ (FT)

Henry Foy — Tainted Russian oil threatens to pollute politics of gas (FT)

FT View — Green party gains should embolden the EU on climate change (FT)

António Guterres — Further inaction on climate change is simply not an option (FT)

Lakshmi Mittal — Politics remains the biggest obstacle to climate change action (FT)

Richard Perez and Karl Rabago — A radical idea to get a high-renewable electric grid: Build way more solar and wind than needed (The Conversation)

Tim Buckley — The global energy transformation is well under way (Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis)

Quote of the week

“I am pleased that the Department of Energy is doing what it can to promote an efficient regulatory system that allows for molecules of US freedom to be exported to the world.”

— Mark Menezes, the US undersecretary of energy, attracted a lot of attention with his description of American liquefied natural gas as “freedom gas”

Chart of the week

This chart showing the levelised cost of electricity from solar power comes from Irena, the International Renewable Energy Agency, which this week published its latest report on generation costs. The report is full of interesting charts, but this is one of the most striking: the levelised cost of photovoltaic solar dropped 75 per cent in just eight years from 2010 to 2018. The decline is expected to continue this year and into 2020. For some other renewable energy technologies, the decline in costs has been slower. In offshore wind, for example, improvements in the technology have been offset by the move to more challenging deeper waters. But for PV solar, the progress has been inexorable. Irena concludes that solar PV has the highest learning rate of all renewable generation technologies.

FT



39 Comments on "The week in energy: The nuclear threat"

  1. eugene on Sat, 1st Jun 2019 8:58 am 

    Nuclear has always been bullshit to me. The thought we can build storage facilities that will be safe for thousands of yrs in the future is wishful thinking. I see one of these “safe forever” storage “tanks” in the Pacific is leaking. All we are doing with nuclear is taking care of ourselves and to hell with the future.

  2. Sissyfuss on Sat, 1st Jun 2019 10:48 am 

    Thorium salt reactors would be a huge improvement but politicos surfeit with violent dreams see no value in them.

  3. Robert Inget on Sat, 1st Jun 2019 12:57 pm 

    Sissy’s right,

    Nuclear energy hasn’t moved much since the 50’s
    The first time a nuclear reactor generated power was on Dec. 20, 1951, near Arco, Idaho. This experimental reactor produced around 100kW of power and was also the first reactor to have a partial meltdown in 1955.

    Reactors to power ships were going to end oil consumption at sea.
    Only the ‘Defense Department’ could defend
    massive cost overruns.

    Today, Aircraft Carriers and submarines are nuke powered.

    It’s all about Central Power generation and losses
    transporting that CP to final users.
    Of course that goes for coal fired plants as well.

    In the ‘time of Trump’ it would be easier to site
    coal belching power in the US then anything nuclear. ‘The politics of Fear.’
    Really ‘safe’ nuclear, may take a dozen years to complete. Just Google ‘Nuclear Plants under construction’.

    OTOH, a wind or solar farm goes up in months.
    Trump hates wind farms too. Don’t dare trying to put one up off shore one of his money losing golf courses.

    The ‘best. solution still evades. Personal storage
    certainly comes closest.

    Saudi Arabia flared NG for fifty years. Now that its oil wells are watering out, gas becomes scarce, they suddenly need Nuclear just to go on living in 50 C/122 F heat daily.
    Solar doesn’t perform well in Saudi desert heat.
    PV covering Dust storms are frequent.

    Nuclear energy for big cities with little other choice make perfect sense.

    I’ve enjoyed grid tie solar power for 11 years.
    Looking forward to one of Tesla’s Power Walls
    in case our earth quake prone grid goes down for long periods.

    Our ‘grid’ was designed before intrusive super computers.

  4. Theedrich on Sat, 1st Jun 2019 6:00 pm 

    Until the U.S. (and the world) can fix on a place to bury nuclear waste, nuclear plants have no future.  Nevada’s Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository would have been such a place, but the Nevadans refused to countenance it.  Some nuke plants are using dry cask storage for the waste, but this is not a truly permanent solution.  The “Not-In-My-Backyard” (NIMBY) objection has, as is usual in difficult cases of any kind in America, put the entire country in a no-exit trap.  Despite the customary political blather, there are no serious solutions to this quiet national cancer, which will continue to grow until some catastrophe or collapse happens.

    In short, democracy is not a long-term solution for mankind.

  5. makati1 on Sat, 1st Jun 2019 6:17 pm 

    Robert, and your “alt energy” is sustainable without FFs? Bullshit! How many rare earths are involved? Hmm? Many! Panels, converters, and batteries for a start.

    From my recent reading, a ton of rare earths require processing ~2,000 tons of what eventually becomes radioactive, poisonous waste? Maybe that is why most countries will not mine and process it?

    Then there are the mining and refining of all those other ingredients, with FFs! Not to mention transportation, manufacture, installation and replacement.

    When FFs stop, so dies ALL other energy forms not originating from muscle power which is provided by plants that use solar energy.

  6. I AM THE MOB on Sat, 1st Jun 2019 8:16 pm 

    The 2020 global crisis and a third world war

    The sequence of events, in my view, will be:

    We are looking at a global economic crisis leading to stagflation. The evolving bilateral technological, trade, economic, IP rights, political and military conflicts will culminate into a real confrontation globally. The crisis and emerging conflicts will lead to the third world war between the US and China. The US and China will meet to end the war, as all wars end with agreements. A new world order governed by the G-2 (US and China) will emerge.

    http://www.jordantimes.com/opinion/talal-abu-ghazaleh/2020-global-crisis-and-third-world-war

  7. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 1:58 am 

    “The crisis and emerging conflicts will lead to the third world war between the US and China. The US and China will meet to end the war, as all wars end with agreements. A new world order governed by the G-2 (US and China) will emerge.”

    Ridiculous scenario. Hardly any war between A and B ends in a truce and a “let’s rule the world together” end-good-all-good.

    Usually wars end because one party wins. War means inflicting pain on each other, increasing hatred, making agreements ever less likely.

    Mobster has outsourced his geopolitical thinking to a Palestinian from Jordan. Should give you a clear insight into his level of desperation.

    The real ingredients to build geopolitical prediction upon:

    – US exceptionalism
    – Chinese-Russian alliance
    – Brexit split western alliance
    – White desperation in the US and white nationalism
    – European unification and EU army ambitions
    – New Silk Road Eurasian integration
    – European dependence on Russia for energy
    – Disruptive Trump presidency, feeding white nationalism
    – Russian drive to become accepted by Europe

    As I have said 100 times before, the 2nd Orwellian map is the default geopolitical outcome:

    https://documents1940.wordpress.com/2017/09/26/which-future-world/

    with Oceania (Anglosphere) racially bolshevized.

    Only if white Americans can motivate themselves to an insurrection, a happy flow, depicted in the first map, can be realized.

  8. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 2:17 am 

    The upcoming equivalent of the 1938 Anschluss Germany-Austria:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anschluss

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7095217/Donald-Trump-urges-British-government-send-Brexit-Party-leader-renegotiate-deal-Brussels.html

    “Now Trump backs No Deal Brexit ahead of state visit, says Farage should mastermind exit negotiations with Brussels and vows to secure a UK-US trade deal after Britain leaves EU”

    England to be integrated into Oceania.
    And we made Antius vote for it.
    Irony of history.
    Means the end of white England.
    Perhaps Scotland can be saved.

    But no-deal Brexit is by no means as popular in Britain as the original Anschluss was. It is still 50-50. The former big-two LAB-CON are being marginalized and replaced by LibDem-Remain vs Brexit-Leave. Britain becomes severely polarized. Civil war potential?

  9. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 3:00 am 

    Latest Westminster poll:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-party-farage-leads-general-election-poll-opinium-a8940191.html

    Brexit+Con+UKIP=44%
    Lab+LibDem+Greens+SNP+ChangeUK=54%

    This poll looks very different from the last one with the LibDems leading 24% over Brexit party 22%

    But still, there is absolutely no majority for a no-deal Brexit. There are even in the Tory party many who oppose that.

    I’m personally more concerned that Brexit will be cancelled in the last minute.

    The only sensible outcome would be signing the May-deal. But for that you need sensible politicians and they are in short supply at the moment.

    Meanwhile in Germany the governing “Grand Coalition” of conservatives and social-democrats is running out of steam and the country could become ungovernable:

    https://www.spiegel.de/politik/deutschland/olaf-scholz-schliesst-erneute-grosse-koalition-aus-a-1270392.html

    Like everywhere in Europe, old-school social-democracy is phasing itself out because of their fatal embrace of multiculturalism and all the little guys defecting to the populists, just like in the thirties.

    Leftism is soooo 20th century.

    For America this trend comes too late, but Europe can still be saved.

  10. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 3:36 am 

    CLogg

    Global Electricity Generation by Fuel Source (2016)
    https://i.imgur.com/xldgKLs.png

    Source: IEA
    https://www.iea.org/statistics/?country=WORLD&year=2016&category=Electricity&indicator=ElecGenByFuel&mode=chart&dataTable=ELECTRICITYANDHEAT

    What’s not shown in the pie chart is that electricity only makes up approximately 20% of total world energy demand, so, so called renewables make up 22.2% of 20% of total world energy demand – < 1%. Scale is everything.

    LOL

  11. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 3:55 am 

    Global Electricity Generation by Fuel Source (2016)

    LOL

    That’s merely “the world”, including backward territories like the third world and the US.

    Here are the winners:

    https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/renewables-hit-record-77-percent-german-power-easter-monday

    https://cleantechnica.com/2018/01/06/44-wind-denmark-smashed-already-huge-wind-energy-records-2017/

    https://www.renewableenergyhub.co.uk/blog/scottish-renewables-breaking-new-records-in-2018/

    Accept it, you are a loser, a has-been.

    Europe always was #1 and will remain #1, certainly now we are in the process of finally overcoming the Anglo-Soviet globalist disaster 1914-1945.

    https://documents1940.wordpress.com/2017/09/26/origin-scientific-accomplishments/

    Mind the step on your way out and keep talking yourself into the grave by insisting that nothing works. Only a third-worlder talks like that. Like you, empire dave and anonymous.lol

  12. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 4:15 am 

    Mobster is a genius, he really is:

    The crisis and emerging conflicts will lead to the third world war between the US and China. The US and China will meet to end the war, as all wars end with agreements. A new world order governed by the G-2 (US and China) will emerge.

    Well, at least about the first part:

    https://www.rt.com/news/460857-china-fight-trade-taiwan/

    “Chinese defense minister vows to ‘fight to the end, at all costs’ over trade & Taiwan”

    Beijing will fight to the end to protect its national interests both economically, amid the trade war with the US, and militarily, if any outside force dares to challenge the One China policy and split Taiwan from the mainland.

    Although I do not believe in an all-out war between the US and China, I very well believe that China intends to chase the US out of the SCS and Taiwan and has the means to do so.

    https://www.rt.com/newsline/460762-philippines-duterte-china-sea/

    “Philippines president says S. China Sea becoming ‘flashpoint’”

    If that happens, expect the Philippines to become occupied again. This time not by the Japanese but by China.

  13. Davy on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 4:19 am 

    “Like everywhere in Europe, old-school social-democracy is phasing itself out because of their fatal embrace of multiculturalism and all the little guys defecting to the populists, just like in the thirties. Leftism is soooo 20th century.”

    Dream on clogg, the left is stronger in Europe than anywhere else in the world. The populous right is just getting closer to their power. The left will not budge and your right will stall. More Europe governance by committee meaning paralysis just like the US. I keep trying to tell you a majority of European women are left leaning. They sure don’t want to follow your lead. They are emancipated and the last thing they would want is to be a clogg frau.

  14. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 4:23 am 

    Clogg

    Your sources are biased and fake news..And you can put a few countries on a pedestal all you want..That doesn’t change the stats..

    You have to post sources from renewable industry..

    HAHHA

    You are as sad as you are funny..

    The numbers I cited speak for themselves grandpa

  15. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 4:24 am 

    CLogg

    Global Electricity Generation by Fuel Source (2016)
    https://i.imgur.com/xldgKLs.png

    Source: IEA
    https://www.iea.org/statistics/?country=WORLD&year=2016&category=Electricity&indicator=ElecGenByFuel&mode=chart&dataTable=ELECTRICITYANDHEAT

    What’s not shown in the pie chart is that electricity only makes up approximately 20% of total world energy demand, so, so called renewables make up 22.2% of 20% of total world energy demand – < 1%. Scale is everything.

  16. Davy on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 4:24 am 

    “Global Electricity Generation by Fuel Source (2016) LOL That’s merely “the world”, including backward territories like the third world and the US. Here are the winners: “Europe always was #1 and will remain #1”

    Cloggo, Europe’s effort is stalling. I believe China is ahead of you and the US is right behind you. You are full of shit.

  17. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 4:30 am 

    Davy

    Europe will have zero economic growth in a decade..Plus a massive oil shortage..They have no shared culture or language like the US..They are going to collapse into a civil war real soon..

    Best just sit back and eat popcorn and laugh at the stupid Europeans..

    You know Europeans share around 10 percent of their DNA with Neanderthals..

  18. Davy on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 4:31 am 

    “Chinese defense minister vows to ‘fight to the end, at all costs’ over trade & Taiwan” Although I do not believe in an all-out war between the US and China, I very well believe that China intends to chase the US out of the SCS and Taiwan and has the means to do so. If that happens, expect the Philippines to become occupied again. This time not by the Japanese but by China.”

    Cloggo, you can’t distinguish between bluster and reality because that is what you do. China does not have the means to chase the US out of SCS. You are again talking out your ass. You tend to talk out your ass on military matters because you don’t understand what is going on. Your fantasy gets in the way. I would like you to explain how China is going to occupy the P’s and the big question is why? You say that about Australia also but have no clue how China would get the men there to do it BTW with a fight in the process. You are completely washed up and this is why you spam this board saying the same things over and over.

  19. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 4:42 am 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ln6-kcuHstc

    LOL

    Sending a very sinkable bathtub over the ocean in order to “project power” and threaten a 1350 million nation is so mid-20th century thinking.

    https://www.foxnews.com/tech/us-unable-to-defend-against-russian-and-chinese-hypersonic-weapons-report-warns

    https://nationalinterest.org/blog/us-military-admits-its-helpless-against-hypersonic-missile-25098

    A child understands that.

    But not goat herd armchair generals from the Ozarks, whose minute brains are clouded by wishful thinking regarding American grandeur of decades gone by.

    You couldn’t defeat tiny nations like Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria. And now you want to control the coming #1 super power?

    #BeerAndPopcorn

  20. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 6:15 am 

    All-American Despair

    For the past two decades, a suicide epidemic fueled by guns, poverty and isolation has swept across the West, with middle-aged white men dying in record numbers.
    https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-features/suicide-rate-america-white-men-841576/

    Poor Whitey..I almost shed a tear..HAHAAH

    We can just import as many immigrants as we need to replace the great white slob..They will be more than happy to live here..

    #MAYOCIDE!

  21. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 6:19 am 

    Dream on clogg, the left is stronger in Europe than anywhere else in the world.

    BS. You are confusing an American and European understanding of left-right.

    American right means: big business, low taxes, small government. In this sense America is indeed more right-wing than Europe. But it is globalist right. The American ideal is a successful billionaire businessman with a Chinese spouse.

    European right means: protecting the ethnic identity of your nation (“blood and soil”). In that sense Europe is FAR more right-wing than America. Every European country has one or more nationalist parties for decades, where America never had one. US White nationalists for a moment thought that Trump was doing their bidding, but the likes of Richard Spencer, Ann Coulter and Steve Bannon have all distanced themselves from Trump (maybe premature). European nations had erected effective fences in 2015 in a matter of weeks (Balkans, Hungary, Austria). America in contrast is still struggling to build one, as the effort is sabotaged from all sides.

    The populous right is just getting closer to their power. The left will not budge and your right will stall.

    That’s what you hope. My thesis is that the strength of populism is proportional with the amount of invaders in your country. The downfall of Merkel (that could be immanent thanks to the events today in the SPD) could really turn the switch and force an opening towards Russia, what all populists want but is mostly blocked by Merkel.

    I keep trying to tell you a majority of European women are left leaning.

    https://eu.usatoday.com/story/life/people/2019/06/01/taylor-swift-pens-letter-pressing-senate-pass-equality-act-tennessee-trump/1311879001/

    Like everywhere else. Hence remove them from power.

    They sure don’t want to follow your lead. They are emancipated and the last thing they would want is to be a clogg frau.

    They will, if strong family laws will be in place again, and divorce basically abolished and they can rely on their husband for security again, like before 1968.

    Feminism is the fault of men, who demanded commie free sex, not of women. Women do not want to be like men, but were forced to become men, thanks to the irresponsible behavior of western “men”.

  22. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 6:31 am 

    Poor Whitey..I almost shed a tear..HAHAAH

    We can just import as many immigrants as we need to replace the great white slob..They will be more than happy to live here..

    #MAYOCIDE!

    The jewish agenda in full display.

    https://documents1940.wordpress.com/2018/10/31/eric-kaufmann-on-white-shift/

    https://documents1940.wordpress.com/2017/09/27/paul-krugman-white-americans-are-losing-their-country/

    https://documents1940.wordpress.com/2017/10/26/the-new-america/

    Unfortunately for mobster, US society has reached a breaking point.

    Van Jones in 2016, election night: “This is a white-lash. This was a white-lash against a changing country”

    Correct. And that white lash will only grow in strength, hand-in-hand with shifting demographics. Trump will probably win one more time because of white flight from Dems to Reps. But in 2024 at the latest, it will be flash in the pan.

    Of course, Europe and Russia will be standing by and give our white cousins a hand in getting America over with.

    [insert vile natzi grin here]

    Mobster and his water carrier empire dave have only one model in store for white America: ever more darkies rammed through their throats, who get more demanding with every passing day, because they smell blood, white blood. And they intend to demonize and eventually erase every aspect of white history and culture.

    #Timber!

    If I was running an insurance company I would refuse to sell mobster and empire dave a life insurance.

  23. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 6:47 am 

    Van Jones:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92laVQ4HbYI

    Excellent summary of what happened in November 2016. He is emotional and honestly upset and I perfectly understand why. Because he senses the catastrophe that could very well be underway: the end of diversity and breakup of the country.

    But feeling sorry for a civilized man like Van Jones is not going to solve anything. White civilization is under dire threat from the third world, enabled by the treacherous “elites”, Van Jones is referring to.

    Everywhere in Europe and America, immigration (=white displacement) is on top of the political agenda. And sooner rather than later this is going to be followed by drastic action, read separation, if not extreme violence.

    The Death of the West will come as Enoch Powell predicted: with rivers of blood.

  24. Davy on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 6:54 am 

    “You are confusing an American and European understanding of left-right.”
    You are confusing the fact I have lived in Europe. I have firsthand knowledge and experience with a wife that is Italian and a daughter that is Spanish. My wife has many European friends. One of my best friends is Dutch. I do not compare the US and Europe as you do in a hypercompetitive way of fantasy futures and revisionist pasts. I talk about the here and now. I discuss Europe in a straight forward way not a binary chauvinistic way as you do. My comments stands and you are full of shit.

    “I keep trying to tell you a majority of European women are left leaning. “Like everywhere else. Hence remove them from power.” “They sure don’t want to follow your lead. They are emancipated and the last thing they would want is to be a clogg frau.” “They will, if strong family laws will be in place again, and divorce basically abolished and they can rely on their husband for security again, like before 1968.” Feminism is the fault of men, who demanded commie free sex, not of women. Women do not want to be like men, but were forced to become men, thanks to the irresponsible behavior of western “men”.”
    Like most crusty pissed-off old white men you live in a total fantasy world. You are pissing in the wind if you think you are going to take women back to the past when they were treated as less than equal. NOT GOING TO HAPPEN CLOGGO. Now, if, collapse happens the male/female relationship will change profoundly but this also means many men will go back in time when they were indentured servants or slaves. It works both ways. This board is full of pathetic old white men who whine and bitch. You are the classic kind who thinks his shit does not stink and his tribe is the greatest.

  25. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 7:18 am 

    You are confusing the fact I have lived in Europe. I have firsthand knowledge and experience with a wife that is Italian and a daughter that is Spanish. My wife has many European friends. One of my best friends is Dutch. I do not compare the US and Europe as you do in a hypercompetitive way of fantasy futures and revisionist pasts. I talk about the here and now. I discuss Europe in a straight forward way not a binary chauvinistic way as you do. My comments stands and you are full of shit.

    You are confusing European and American concepts of left and right and no amounts of irrelevant text can cover that up.

    You are pissing in the wind if you think you are going to take women back to the past when they were treated as less than equal.

    Men and women aren’t equal and can’t be equal.

    Women, that’s about love, beauty, care, children, compassion, running a family.

    Men, that’s about inventing and further developing civilization, science, technology, money making, provider-ship, military.

    Any other model means the destruction of society.

  26. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 7:43 am 

    Clogg

    You are one paranoid delusional old man..The reason the US and Europe is taking in so many immigrants is because of the low birthrate that is below replacement..You need to keep your birth rate above replacement to keep your economy from stagnating and to pay for retire’s benefits..If not you would have to raise the retirement age to over 75 years or so because you need on average five workers paying into the system to fund every one retire’s benefits..

    You are just a misinformed racist who doesn’t understand how economic dynamics work..

  27. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 8:05 am 

    “You are just a misinformed racist who doesn’t understand how economic dynamics work..”

    You and empire dave are stupid globalist Americans, who think that you can reduce all humans from all corners of the globe into interchangeable economic resources, where in reality you are slowly morphing your society into a giant powder keg.

    The Trump presidency is the first and last warning signal that this diverse model of society is not going to work, other than with extreme totalitarian means. The latter is a distinct possibility to materialize.

  28. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 8:26 am 

    CLogg

    Me and Davy how no control over the worlds economic system..And I am not trying to reduce anyone or anything..

    You are just making up baseless conspiracies because you can’t accept the truth..

    you’re grasping at straws..just another deluded old man..

  29. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 8:29 am 

    Clogg

    Trump lost the popular vote by over 3 million..The only reason he barely won was because people on the left didn’t take him seriously so they didn’t show up to vote..Trump got less votes than Mitt Romney got back in 2012..So he didn’t even grow the republican electorate..

    In 2020 the left won’t make the same mistake again..And Trump is going to be crushed by the younger voters..Just like the Republicans got crushed in 2018 mid terms..

  30. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 8:33 am 

    Richard Spencer and my nothingness think that white flight from Dems to Reps will secure one last victory for the God-Emperor.

  31. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 9:04 am 

    Hitler was a massive dork.

    https://i.redd.it/4rzmmnb7du131.jpg

  32. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 9:48 am 

    “Hitler was a massive dork.”

    But absolutely had a point regarding your tribe:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtlRHPMeV_4

  33. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 12:02 pm 

    Clogg

    Its not mine tribe..I was born and raised in a rural Indiana town..I have only met one jewish person in my entire life..And I am an atheist.

    Time to take your meds grandpa

  34. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 1:31 pm 

    Most jews are atheist these days.

    “I have only met one jewish person in my entire life”

    Every morning in the bath room.

    Seriously, in every post you gloat about the demise of white America. No white leftist dies that.

    I stick by my diagnosis.

  35. I AM THE MOB on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 5:12 pm 

    Clogg

    I don’t have to disprove something you have never proven..If you want to make up baseless accusations you can..I have no reason to lie about anything..You on the other hand have several good reasons to lie..

  36. Cloggie on Sun, 2nd Jun 2019 5:14 pm 

    I don’t have to disprove something you have never proven.

    Of course not, my friend. No worries.

    Mazzeltov.

  37. Gaia on Mon, 3rd Jun 2019 5:30 pm 

    We are all in this mess together. We need to stop blaming others for our problems and take responsibility for our problems.

    Example: People blaming immigrants for their countries economic troubles and when confronted denying that they are racist.

  38. Gaia on Mon, 3rd Jun 2019 5:31 pm 

    Humanity has only one enemy: itself.

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