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Page added on March 27, 2016

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Deepwater Horizon – The Movie

Due out in September apparently.



22 Comments on "Deepwater Horizon – The Movie"

  1. rockman on Sun, 27th Mar 2016 9:48 am 

    Can’t wait to see how technically accurate it is. Hollywood has a habit of getting reality wrong for the sake of entertainment. Also if they try to whitewash the monumental mental blunders made on the rig. More then once the Rockman has been on a rig that took a kick and blew drill mud out of the hole. Fortunately no blowout. Slightly personal for the Rockman: didn’t know him but worked with the uncle of one of the dead floor hands. Bad enough for the uncle to deal with the boy’s mom but just two weeks before the uncle had to bury his a adult son killed in an accident.

    A bad f*cking memory to start what was a nice Sunday morning. LOL.

  2. geopressure on Sun, 27th Mar 2016 1:26 pm 

    I was on the Deepwater Nautilus (the Horizon’s sistership – they both have/had the slanted columns – only semi’s like that) when all that went down…

    We were drilling the Appomattox Discovery Well in MC-392 when the Horizon Blew Out in MC-252… I was no days-off though & never went back…

    I was fortunate in that no one I knew died… Hell, I didn’t even know anyone on the Horizon…

    I have the E-Logs to the Macando Well, if anyone is interested…


    I’ve got a friend who is a drilling consultant who was cast as roughneck in the movie. He’s a smart guy, but he does not look or sound very smart. I have a feeling that they will be trying to portray our industry negatively…

  3. geopressure on Sun, 27th Mar 2016 1:30 pm 

    I’ve never seen the trailer before, that looks just like the Nautilus’s Drillfloor, I think it was a set in South Louisiana somewhere though…

  4. Go Speed Racer on Sun, 27th Mar 2016 1:41 pm 

    Wow! Watch the earth get destroyed on the IMAX screen!! Need more popcorn!! There were two BP corporate A-holes on the rig they flew in on helicopter and forced the drill crew to break all the rules. Managers objected but the suits blew it all sky-high. Same as the two space shuttle destructions, those most directly responsible for manslaughter will be promoted to the next level, with an 8 figure salary. Don’t expect any of that to be shown in this movie.

  5. rockman on Sun, 27th Mar 2016 5:38 pm 

    Racer – I’m fairly familiar with the details. The primary reason for the catastrophe was their following a very risky (IMHO) but legal procedure. In over 40 years and hundreds of wells the Rockman not once saw any company follow that procedure. No one was “forced” to break any rules that caused the accident. And even though that procedure had failed monumentally there was a good chance they still could have prevented the blowout had the been monitoring the well properly.

    And guess what: after the worse environmental disaster in US history I can’t confirm if the govt has made that same risky procedure illegal. The reg change may be there but I’ve yet to find it.

  6. Go Speed Racer on Sun, 27th Mar 2016 6:42 pm 

    Thx Rockman, good info, appreciate the critique. But about those 2 BP exec’s…… something went wrong,
    the 2 BP executives got charged with crimes…

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2012/11/15/bp-near-settlement-with-us-over-gulf-spill/1706209/

    Well, once the company lawyers get them loose of the frivolous charges, then comes the 8 figure salary and snorting cocaine off the curves of those pricey hookers.

    I think they need more exec’s like that. Where do I send in my resume?

  7. geopressure on Sun, 27th Mar 2016 9:03 pm 

    The 2 BP executives that you are speaking of were drilling consultants aka. Company-men… They took the fall… All the advanced decisions were made in Houston, all of the realtime decisions were made on the drill-floor…

  8. rockman on Sun, 27th Mar 2016 10:04 pm 

    Raced – As geo says. After the movie comes out we’ll go over the facts. At least one of the consultants/company men didn’t take the questionable cement test serious enough. Bad judgement call but not illegal. But the worst offense IMHO was THE COMPANY APPPROVAL of leaving the well in an underhanded state. Will explain that after to movie comes out. No one on the rig was responsible for that procedure. But contributing mistakes were made on the rig.

    But an offshore drill rig is a bit like a ship. And in the end the captain is ultimately responsible for safety regardless of company policies. On that rig there were two hands with that responsibility. Either could have refused to follow that plan. But doing so might get them run off. Such is life: the Rockman has walked off one job and got run off on another under such circumstances.

    But as I alluded to before not closely monitoring the well was the big SIN committed on the rig especially after the was a VERY BITTER argument about the safety factor. And that’s what I’ll never understand: with that level of dispute the well should have been closely watched by those concerned. And it wasn’t monitored even when normal protocol should have 2 or 3 hands checking.

  9. Go Speed Racer on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 1:17 am 

    Wow. Sounds like you guys know how to drill for oil. I admit to not knowing enough about this. So I will stay out of your industry, other than my job is to burn up your products by going down the freeway. :O)

  10. rockman on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 5:04 am 

    Racer – There’s a lot of what happens in the oil patch that’s too technical to go into on sites like this. But when we go over the details after the movie is released you’ll be shocked (and probably more angry then before) to learn the simplicity of the situation and how it could have easily been avoided. It will be difficult for many here to understand now but the procedure that would have likely prevented the blowout has been a common drilling practice FOR OVER 100 YEARS. I’m not kidding when I say the preventative actions that should have been taken weren’t rocket science: in 15 minutes I could train a 15 year old on the monitoring method that would have alerted the drill crew to the pending disaster long before it happened and would have allowed them to react properly.

    As risky as the BP policy that led to the blowout might have been there was another common procedure that would have likely prevented the accident. And that very simple procedure wasn’t followed. There is great justification for the public to be outraged over the BP company policy (and the federal govt for allowing it)as well as the failure of those on the rig overseeing the activities. It’s just that the general public doesn’t know the actual reason it should be very pissed off about the accident. LOL

  11. Dooma on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 5:51 am 

    As a commercial aircraft mechanic, I am sure that the rig workers here will spend their time laughing at the BS just as I do with a movie containing an aircraft as a set.

    And logic dictates that their should be a white president in the film.

  12. geopressure on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 6:09 am 

    The Macando Well had been giving them fits for months… For like 3 months every MI-Swaco Mud Plant in LA & TX had been mixing & shipping 14.4# Reliant Mud to the docks – I think they lost like 40K BBLs total or something like that…

    They drilled through a sand that had a higher pressure & required a 14.4# mud weight…

    They knew that their target, just a few hundred feet below was likely under-pressured & they should have set casing before drilling into it…

    However, that would have left 5.5″ casing across the pay, which is undesirable in Deepwater wells, so they drilled ahead…

    The Pay Zone was beautiful, but only had a reservoir pressure of 12.6# Equivalent mud weight…

    So, over the course of the next 3 months, it drank 40K BBLs of mud while BP tried to find a solution…

    The Permeability was astronomical & they could not get it to seal off…

    Now they had the challenge of pumping cement high enough up the annulus to seal the 14.4# sand (at 17,700), without the main reservoir at 18,100 drinking that cement… It didn’t work in the lab… & it didn’t work in the field…

    While running casing, they had dropped the MW & the well was flowing & kicking (trying to increase the odds of getting a good cement job) the Schlumberger Wireline Crew walked into the company man’s office & demanded a helicopter come get them because this was not safe…

    BP refused… So Schlumberger sent their own helicopter… This was covered up, but this is why no cement bond log was run… There was no body to run it…


    I don’t really know too much about the event’s that transpired after the cement job… I think all the smart people went to sleep as soon as they realized that the well was no longer flowing (which it wasn’t yet – I don’t think)…

    Like I say, I don’t know much about the actual events that transpired the day of the accident, just the stuff leading up to the cement job…

  13. geopressure on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 6:17 am 

    The 17,700′ Sand had a pressure of 13,250psi & was about 10′ thick…

    The 18,100′ Sand had a pressure of 11,860psi & was about 100′ thick – Ultra High Perm…

    Should have set casing between these two different pressure zones…


    LLOG has the lease now & someone told me they are producing from the same reservoir, though I have been unable to confirm…

  14. rockman on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 7:45 am 

    Geo – If you didn’t catch this detail at the time: after they had the questionable cmt test they displaced about half (?) the mud with sea water. IOW they intentionally left the well underbalanced by several pounds (?). With the bad cmt job it was just a simple matter for the well to unload down the annulus and back up the csg. Essentially they accidentally brought the well in. Don’t know about your experiences but I’ve never seen a well intentionally left underbalanced after a csg run. But in most cases I’ve have perforated a well a little underbalanced but that was expected to bring the well in almost immediately and was prepared for it.

    That’s the point I was alluding to about monitoring the well. Once the well flowed down the annulus it unloaded the entire mud column and apparently no one was watching returns to see the mud flowing out while the pumps were off. That’s why the floor hands didn’t stand a chance: the well unloaded oil/gas right to the drill floor before they had an opportunity to shut it in. But one person recognized the situation but didn’t put 2 and 2 together: the boat captain tied to the rig. They were pumping mud down to his tanks when he radioed them to stop pumping because his tanks were full. They told him that couldn’t be because they still had a lot of mud left in the rig tanks. That extra mud in the rig tanks was what had unloaded from the csg.

    I’ve never handled an offshore well but when drilling in the bayous I always had the well checked for flow with every connection let alone when I thought I might see a kick coming. But you’ve probably been on an offshore rig demobilizing and know how distracting that can be. That’s the only explanation I can come up to explain why no one was paying attention to returns. Especially since more than a few (including Schlumberger) were concerned. Are you aware that when the two consultants argued about the cmt test the one who lost the argument said “I guess that’s why we have BOP’s.” I’m sure you know the implications of such a statement and that it’s never said lightly.

    That was the statement that got me run off a job that time. And I was glad to leave the rig. LOL.

  15. rockman on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 7:50 am 

    LLOG may have the offset lease and are producing it there. Way back when I think LLOG and another offset lease owner(a Japanese company?) were going to participate in the BP well. The potential trap extended across the lease line. But then BP withdrew the offer. A very lucky day for those two companies.

  16. geopressure on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 8:32 am 

    Interesting…

    Yeah, they made some really pore decisions after the cement job – when I speculate that all the smart people went to sleep…

    Using the Riser for a a negative pressure test instead of the choke/kill line… Poor interpretation of results…

    The OIM was from Laurel, MS (where I’m from) & on his days off prior to going back out, he had moved a bunch of money around & written a last will & testament – So they all knew that there was a good chance that things were going to go wrong…

    I think they had limited BOP capabilities left & had been faking BOP test for quite a while…

    The decisions made after the Cement Job though are very confusing…

    In the end, there was only a 10% chance of the shear rams landing on a tool joint, but it did & they were unable to disconnect…

  17. geopressure on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 8:51 am 

    Chevron has retrieved Miocene Cores from the GoM that had over 10,000 mD of Permeability…

    I think that the targeted Pay Sand that BP was going after had permeabilities that were of this magnitude…

    They spent months trying to get the formation to seal off so they could get a good cement job, but no luck…

  18. rockman on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 1:31 pm 

    geo – I appreciate that the OIM did want to lose his job but he also didn’t want to die either. Always a tough choice when your family is counting on you. He probably figured if it came to it the family would at least get his life insurance.

    Once I was sleeping off tour when we were going in hole. When the BHA got to the BOP on the sea floor it rammed into something so hard that it shook the rig (5,000’ up) so hard I woke up. I’m sure you know the drill: grab your life jacket and stand in the door in your underwear waiting for an alarm. And looking down the hallway at other hands doing the same. A prudent operator would have immediately pull out of hole and pulled the BOP up for inspection. Might have cost $5 million in lost time. But they didn’t. I’m not sure the incident was even recorded on the morning report.

    And no: I didn’t ask the company man about it. My family was dependent on me also. But I did sleep with my clothes on for the rest of the hitch: difficult to look manly running to the lifeboats in your tidy whities. LOL.

    Dooma – Like the scene in “Armageddon” when everyone was cheering as oil blew out of the hole onto the drill floor where they were all standing. Just like what happened on the BP well. Except, of course, for the explosion and fire that killed 11 hands. LOL.

  19. Practicalmaina on Mon, 28th Mar 2016 11:49 pm 

    Cost of progress eh? Not quite like sacrificing astronauts to touch the face of god. Sacrificing hard working blue collar heroes so people don’t have to shut the car down and go into the fast food place.

  20. charmcitysking on Tue, 29th Mar 2016 6:59 am 

    Who’s gonna play Matt Simmons

  21. rockman on Tue, 29th Mar 2016 7:13 am 

    Practical – Appreciate the thought but there are a lot of others folks doing much more dangerous jobs to help society. BTW the most common cause of death for offshore oil fields hands doesn’t even happen on the rigs: it’s in the chopper transport to and from the rigs. I’ve been scared sh*tless more times in the bird then on the drill floor. LOL.

  22. joe on Tue, 29th Mar 2016 9:00 am 

    We all know what happend. Superman blew really hard and the oil went backwards in, then he lasereyed the hole and said sorry for causing all that trouble!

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