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THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Discussions about the economic and financial ramifications of PEAK OIL

Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Ibon » Thu 18 May 2017, 18:04:05

Midnight Oil wrote:If you attended any EARTH FIRST! Roundups

No thanks. I'll pass.

Wilderness areas are doing just fine...not


Reread what I wrote. Wilderness in protected areas are doing fine. Of course wild lands are disappearing all over the planet n unprotected areas. Biodiversity loss and extinctions are on the rise. The majority of terrestrial earth is now human landscapes.

I don't interact much with political environmental activists and frankly I find most of them boring, opinionated and not at all effective in what they are trying to accomplish. They exist in a bubble. They are mostly not a good source of information.

Trained ecologists and zoologists on the other hand are often great sources of information. We do receive many ecologists and researchers here at Mount Totumas that are doing direct studies in ecology. In the past year herpetologists, entomologists, botanists, ornithologists, geologists. This evening we have our mercury vapor lights on as we have an entomologist from Montreal Canada here with us for the next 7 days. This afternoon we mixed molasses, beer and rum together as a bait and set up traps in the forest in over 20 locations. His focus is beetles.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Thu 18 May 2017, 19:02:49

Counterpoint. This is the Duzy-Ershim trail:
Image
31 miles of terrain, which takes four days of slow rock-crawling to traverse. Every bit as challenging as the Rubicon, but far less crowded. You need at least one more vehicle, at least one locking differential, plus both skill and courage.
Image
This never was a road, a wagon route, or a mule trail. It is a 600 foot wide right of way for 4WD vehicles, between 9000 and 10000 feet above sea level, between the John Muir Wilderness and the Dinkey Lakes Wilderness. It is not maintained, in fact there are no facilities any more elaborate than trail markers.
Image
You can stop and camp at many spots, and there are literally dozens of spots to catch Golden Trout while day hiking into the wilderness.
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These are the state fish of California, among the most difficult fish to catch, and very tasty to boot. It's my favorite place to go, and I have never seen a single tourist, and seldom seen anybody else. If I'm lucky, I may take my grandkids there before I die.
Image
I'm not seeing a lot of relevence to the topic of Capitalism in this discussion.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Ibon » Thu 18 May 2017, 19:09:41

KaiserJeep wrote:I'm not seeing a lot of relevence to the topic of Capitalism in this discussion.


Looks like an awesome place there KJ. Feel blessed you have gotten to experience it. No this tangent on wilderness is not directly related to this thread but that is ok, it is just a tangent and if we persist with it we can merge it with another thread or start a new one but I usually give a lot of latitude with tangents on threads because this is related to the way free association of thoughts and ideas can roam and explore and wind you up in unintended territory.

Than can happen in the wilderness also :)
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Midnight Oil » Thu 18 May 2017, 21:14:13

Sure Ibon real protection for those wilderness lands (sarcasm)... Yep, I think you failed, not passed....

Annie Knox and Kim Palmer
President-elect Donald Trump aims to open up federal lands to more energy development, tapping into a long-running and contentious debate over how best to manage America’s remaining wilderness.

The U.S. government holds title to about 500 million acres of land across the country, including national parks and forests, wildlife refuges and tribal territories stretching from the Arctic to the Gulf of Mexico. They overlay billions of barrels of oil and vast quantities of natural gas, coal, and uranium
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-t ... SKBN14V1EP

Even worse at other protected wilderness areas..... Just a piece of paper on a map

"Around the world, industrialized society is stealing tribal lands in the pursuit of profit. What's happening in Brazil is simply a continuation of the invasion and genocide which characterized the European colonization of the Americas," said the group's director, Stephen Corry.

The organization quoted a letter the Harpy Eagle tribe sent to Brazilian police, in which they call the land grab "extremely serious

https://m.phys.org/news/2016-10-brazil- ... vists.html

Amid escalating violence, the Brazilian government this month fired Antonio Costa, the former head of FUNAI, just months after he took office. The official’s removal came days after he criticized lawmakers for cutting the agency’s budget by more than 40 percent, which he said impeded the agency’s ability to fulfill its obligation to protect land rights for Brazil’s 900,000 indigenous people.

Brazil is home to hundreds of indigenous tribes, and dozens of their members are killed in conflicts over land every year. Official statistics indicate that the violence is escalating, with 61 land rights campaigners killed last year – the highest figure recorded in Brazil since 2003.

Many tribes say their communities are increasingly threatened by proposed dams, agricultural plantations and infrastructure projects, which activists have repeatedly blamed for environmental damage and human rights abuses across the region.

http://www.humanosphere.org/human-right ... ts-agency/

Dang, they must be taking a lesson from the Trump Administration!

Trump’s budget blueprint includes gouges to public lands programs, including across the board cuts at the Departments of Interior and Agriculture – totaling over $6 billion. The Department of Interior, now headed by our previous congressman, Ryan Zinke, oversees the National Park System, the Bureau of Land Management, and additional iconic agencies that are crucial to the protection of our natural resources.

Yep, Ibon...Old Cactus Ed had it right....disappearing Fast....
But your an Old Man at 60...relish those sweet memories.

BTW, too bad you didn't
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread pt 4

Unread postby ralfy » Thu 18 May 2017, 22:40:49

Ibon wrote:
Edward Abbey's words are as salient today as they were 40 years ago when I read them the first time and resonated with them. Midnight, this is no longer relevant today. The great vast majority because they never knew anything different, choose to stay deeply embedded in the malaise Edward Abbey writes about. They have no interest to go beyond the superficial experience of motoring down a black asphalt road looking at arches and scenery out their window. They are unfamiliar with a Canyon Wren calling in the acoustics of a slot canyon with the percussion of water dropping down from a seep on the canyon walls.

I have zero interest these days in educating the masses to be more sensitive to the natural world. I prefer the vast ignorance that affords me more solitude in wilderness places. We have built an infrastructure here at Mount Totumas that limits the number of guests and this is by design. There is no adrenalized zip lines through the forest, no Disneyland nature experience here. This is all by design. Just 40km of trails through the Cloud Forest. I get inquiries from folks asking me what are the activities they can do when they come. I send them on to Boquete nearby where they can wait in long lines to zipline through the canopy like fools. Fortunately we still have enough folks who do want to merge with the hum of wilderness, who come here to enter into habitat dominated by the ecosystem with no signs of man outside a trail hardly bigger than a game trail. These are the guests we serve. But again, why try to educate the masses differently? To what end?

Leave the masses to their mediocrity. It opens up plenty of cracks and space for those of us who know better to create our own separate reality.

Edward Abbey was well embedded back then in the 70's that there was still hope to implant in the shallow suburbanites a deeper wilderness ethic. His books were well read and he did succeed as a writer to put prose to these deeper wilderness spaces.

Sorry Edward, we have moved way beyond where you left off. We have a vast sea of shallow fools who have no interest any longer in your prose. A vast sea of humanity where nature is such an abstraction that Edward's words no longer have a hook on to where they can tether. These references are gone among the vast population today.

I like the masses ignorant. They cluster together in places with no future, with values that have no future, with aspirations that remain shallow and indolent. They are not adaptive to the changes coming our way.

Since we have to get back down to a billion or so anyway why not just write them off. Why attempt to educate?

Damn, am I feeling cynical today as I watch the clouds drifting up the valley and enshrouding us in a blanket of mist.


From what I know, most people worldwide are not suburbanites but are poor and came from rural areas. Unfortunately, they do not have funds to meet various basic needs and are forced to earn such in urban areas.

Also, they are partly responsible for the rise and upkeep of private reserves, among others.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby ralfy » Thu 18 May 2017, 22:44:07

Ibon wrote:
35 years ago I was pretty hard core into wilderness trips and expeditions. We didn't even go into national parks which we regarded as parks. We were pretty intense about this, getting a back country permit in a national park meant we were being monitored and controlled of where we had to camp each night etc. We choose not to visit most national parks for this reason.

In the desert southwest we did a lot of back packing trips for 7-10 days into slot canyons on BLM land. Some of those magic spots have become upgraded to national parks or monuments in the meantime. Escalante Canyons and Great Staircase are now monuments, back then in the 70's this was all still BLM land were a few of us knew the access points to some wilderness canyon areas that were completely unknown by the general public. We considered these spots secrets and very few knew about these spots. It was word of mouth and hand drawn maps back then, nothing published. This added to the allure of these places.

I worked back then for several years as a therapeutic wilderness counselor working with problem kids and all our spare time me and my buddies were off on crazy expeditions, back packs, one time 600 km canoeing the Churchhill River in northern Saskatchewan for the whole month of September.

We were hard core. Looking back now as a 60 year old I admit we were kind of arrogant and cocky but at the same time wilderness flowed through our veins and nothing less than unregulated huge wilderness areas off the map would excite us. As I said National Parks were just parks for us.

I am still the same in many ways, I still hold myself somewhat exclusive over most of my fellow humans. This all started back then. Like KJ I have physical limitations but our 400 acres that borders 1.5 million acres still provides me that sense of wilderness, walking our trails that touch directly a vast upland wilderness where tapirs and jaguars still roam.

I am grateful to wilderness for exposing me to a deeper sensibility to the natural world and yes I admit that this perspective makes me consider most humans as having quite diminished lives. Call me elitist if you like, I am just being honest. I consider most of humanity to be shallow & superficial, cowardly, indolent, lazy, mostly trash actually. Takers not givers. Wanting the good life which means big cars and houses and all the works.

This is related to why I support the growing disparity of wealth. Most of humanity makes bad use of wealth. Given the chance they consume away as much as possible, even more than they should as you can see by the debt levels. That's not to say I support the 1%. They are mostly trash as well. I support the growing disparity of wealth in order to restrict wealth to the 99% not because I am aligned with the 1% which I am not. I just know that in aggregate we would be consuming a lot more if we more evenly distributed the wealth. Humans don't handle opulence well, better to restrict access.

I am an elitist.....yep. definitely.


The good life also involves money to travel to private reserves. In several cases, that money is earned by selling lots of big cars and houses.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby ralfy » Fri 19 May 2017, 00:07:38

Ibon wrote:
One thing to keep in mind is that civilization came along just 9000 years ago or so and in our species time line this is like about a second ago. In other words, civilization is a novel arrangement for our species and still being honed and tested. It is no surprise that civilizations have been so tumultuous because they represent this punctuated inflection point as a novel social arrangement departing from our tribal hunter gatherer past. Natural selection of our species basically occurred during a long stable period of equilibrium when our social arrangement was HG tribal culture. Civilization is something still very new and it is hard to tell in these short 9000 years to what degree it has acted as a force of natural selection. Probably insignificant.

I make this point because capitalism as an economic and social system does not represent an end point. It is an economic system that is part of this still novel arrangement of civilization, still part of this punctuated tumultuous inflection point in our species history. Part of a novel continuum that is still very much volatile. If you want an example of that volatility then just consider 7.5 billion humans on the planet.

Most likely capitalism as we know it will morph into something totally different as an economic system in the future especially when we consider the obvious external consequences coming our way. We are in severe human overshoot. We have only witnessed capitalism relatively unbridled and unregulated when resources were unlimited and when the environment was integrated and healthy.

The consequences of human overshoot with a tightening resource base and increasingly unstable environment represents an external wedge into growth based capitalism. It will change and adapt just like cultural values will as well. I think stability and security will increase as cultural values and individual consumption as status will decrease. Increased regulation would seem unavoidable but this may be embraced more willingly from a population valuing stability and security in an increasingly unstable environment. Capitalism will enter a phase certainly of increased regulation. Collectivism will rise as a result of increased regulation. How can this not happen?

This should give pause to many out there who yearn for going back to the good old days when government was less obtrusive. I think we can also pretty much forget about wealth and opulence remaining options for a broad based middle class. Our economic system will adapt to constraints and the fat will be trimmed and the low hanging fruit where this can be easiest achieved should be obvious. The middle class is not part of the power structure but this demographic in aggregate is like the fat underbelly of a salmon. It will be trimmed way back. This is more ecological than ideological.

But we can only identify with a broad brush the forces that will act as the agents of change to our economic system. We really don't have much of a clue.

I have always found that those most rigid and adamant about a certain outcome usually are those trying to drag unsustainable ideologies along with them into an uncertain future. This applies to the entitlement you see from the political left that we can somehow preserve justice and egalitarian outcomes for all 7.5 billion kudzu apes just as much as it apples to the entitlement we see from the political right that we can get through the bottle neck of human overshoot without government regulation of capitalism and without constricting the freedom of the individual. Less justice for all and less unregulated freedoms. Our politics are polarized because both sides are hopelessly entitled.

Not to single any one out but if you take two of our posters like Cid and Cog and watch them fighting it out on these boards you can see how these two positions are both hopelessly unprepared for the external forces that will drive change moving forward.

Personally I look forward to external consequences stamping out mediocrity.

I never saw a mediocre cheetah or a mediocre gazelle.

I do see however billions of mediocre Kudzu Apes currently living shallow indolent lives ripe for culling.... by natural forces of course.


But cheetahs and gazelles may also be threatened by the same external consequences.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Hawkcreek » Fri 19 May 2017, 01:00:06

I've camped and hiked most of my long life, and I see nothing wrong with beautiful places being made open to most of our citizens. The average person doesn't even want to get more than 100 yards away from the gift shop, so they leave the majority of the parks open for the real nature lovers. Most roads don't take up much space, and I have been to lots of places where you could be 50 feet away from the road, and never see it, and probably only hear traffic once a day.
I can walk on my 60 acres and feel the wilderness, and see deer, bear, turkeys, porcupines, and moose.
I detect a lot of wilderness snobbery in this thread so far. The enjoyment of wilderness is in your head. If all you can hear is bird calls or coyotes howling, your mind can accept it is wilderness, and enjoy it. It doesn't spoil it for me to hike all day and find an empty beer can on the trail. I just swear, pick it up, and continue the hike.
But like everything else, you can choose to make the best of something, or the worst.
If you really insist on getting away from it all, you can go to Alaska, and find plenty of places with no one around you for 50 miles ,and like Onlookers comment stated, find plenty of ways to get yourself killed by not knowing what you are doing.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Ibon » Fri 19 May 2017, 07:32:05

Midnight Oil wrote:Sure Ibon real protection for those wilderness lands (sarcasm)... Yep, I think you failed, not passed....


Midnight, I don't dispute anything you stated. There is no argument here. We are destroying wilderness areas at unprecedented rates. Read my past posts.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Midnight Oil » Fri 19 May 2017, 07:54:14

Thanks Ibon for being a good sport....OK think we made our point about the losing battle against the onslaught of Capitalism so called progress and development.
For those misguided ones that believe GREEN Capitalism will provide a means of escape, read this article, later published as a book

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/2106 ... hat-failed

what scientists have called "The Great Acceleration," the engine of global capitalist economic development since 1950 has now engulfed nearly the whole world and accelerated at an ever-faster speed, overwhelming our small blue planet's finite natural resources and limited ability to withstand pollution in a last great fire sale of global upper and middle-class overconsumption. Yet the powers that be, governments and their corporate masters, tell us that growth and consumption must grow even faster if we want to keep our jobs, but "not to worry" because their "green jobs," "carbon taxes" and the like will brake the slide to ecological collapse. This article, originally published January 9, 2014, shows why this patently phony delusion is, nonetheless, so attractive, and why "green capitalism" is a plan for the collapse of civilization and global ecological suicide.

The results are in: No amount of "green capitalism" will be able to ensure the profound changes we must urgently make to prevent the collapse of civilization from the catastrophic impacts of global warming.

And for you Ibon, Dave Foreman's book The Great Outside Description of Wilderness Areas left in the Continental US.
Published way back in 1992 and updated 1996, may be a good read for you and your memories.
Dave was one of the founders of EARTH FIRST!

https://www.amazon.com/Big-Outside-Desc ... 0517587378


This book provides the reader a glimpse into the remaining wilderness areas in the west over 100,000 acres (& smaller ones in the east). It is comprehensive and provides details of the history of the US Forest Service's accomplishments and failures to protect wilderness on public land in this great country we call
OK take care
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Ibon » Fri 19 May 2017, 08:11:31

Midnight Oil wrote:Thanks Ibon for being a good sport....OK think we made our point about the losing battle against the onslaught of Capitalism so called progress and development.


Thanks for the book reference. A nice gift for my daughters who still have the youth to journey into some of these areas.

I always take a degree of solace that we are losing the battle but that in the end we will win the war. Humans are the most vulnerable species on the planet at the moment in terms of being due for a huge correction. The dominant foot print our species has on the planet has a short shelf life and even those small refuge areas of native habitat fragmented as they are will one day be the seed stock that will recolonize former human habitat. No doubt that there will be extinctions of many species before this all plays out but I have little doubt that the future looks bright for restoration as the current incarnation of parasitic kudzu apes will soon go into decline.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby evilgenius » Tue 23 May 2017, 11:26:00

I still don't know what's wrong with a Forest Service management approach that engages the wilderness on the part of the people. Right now, it seems, their road closing policy is a mandate to protect the wilderness from the people. My point is that engaging the wilderness would be an act of preserving it as well as an act of developing it (in the sense of maintaining access and summarizing what can be expected). I don't think that sending a D3 down a road every five to ten years to cut new water bars and clear large obstacles is an act that goes against the preservation aspect of this type of management. Neither do I think that picking up trash once a year is an effort that would only invite more pollution. Basically, I think that man encounters the wilderness individually to varying degrees. In one trip a person may experience a range of degrees. You might go deep in, but you also might spend some time where a lot of other people go also.

This argument reminds me of how people who already live in an area always complain when the existing road infrastructure, usually built from decades ago ideas of what was required, is found no longer up to the task. They don't want any more lanes. They don't want new roads. The casual remark is often that those will only bring more people, as if the roads themselves create the demand. The implication being that the occupation of a specific place derives its essence from those already there, and that anybody else coming there would destroy that essence. This leans heavily upon nostalgia.

I believe there is an element of nostalgia involved in romanticizing the wilderness. You don't have to be John Muir half-way up some big tree in a snowstorm in order to connect with the wilderness. And connecting with the wilderness is important to modifying human behavior. Nostalgia may block that somewhat, reinforcing the barrier of the large bonfire and fear of what's within the trees. We could quite easily grow everything in vats, you know, and cover the earth with a Borg-like exterior. It's only our real understanding, not the nostalgic, of nature that will save it. That takes use, sometimes by people who aren't like us.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Midnight Oil » Tue 23 May 2017, 11:39:13

In a nutshell, very little true wilderness areas left...meaning roadless non commercial places in touch by the wrath of the Industrial Capitalism complex.
Forest Service Management....????
Turning what is left into Commercial Tree Farm Plantation with scenic borders views for folks in their cars driving by....
Trump Administration will driver to open up for development to oil/bad fossil fuels, mining and maybe Walt Disney drive through(sarcasm) along with Fast foodies so folks need not get out of their cars.
Next....
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Hawkcreek » Tue 23 May 2017, 11:45:32

evilgenius wrote:I believe there is an element of nostalgia involved in romanticizing the wilderness. You don't have to be John Muir half-way up some big tree in a snowstorm in order to connect with the wilderness. And connecting with the wilderness is important to modifying human behavior. Nostalgia may block that somewhat, reinforcing the barrier of the large bonfire and fear of what's within the trees. We could quite easily grow everything in vats, you know, and cover the earth with a Borg-like exterior. It's only our real understanding, not the nostalgic, of nature that will save it. That takes use, sometimes by people who aren't like us.

Yes, I agree. That is what I was talking about when I said I detected some wilderness snobbery on this thread. To a person who has always lived in a city, summer camp may seem like the wilderness. Everyone has to start somewhere in their appreciation of nature.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Midnight Oil » Tue 23 May 2017, 12:30:31

Sometimes us snobs are dead on right

http://pagosadailypost.com/2017/05/22/f ... -exchange/

The Honorable Senior Judge Richard P. Matsch issued an Order today affirming that the Forest Service “failed to consider important aspects of the issues before them, offered an explanation for their decision that runs counter to the evidence, failed to base their decision on consideration of the relevant factors, and based their decision on an analysis that is contrary to law.” This Order concludes another chapter in this decade’s long saga to protect Wolf Creek Pass from a large scale residential and commercial development that could accommodate 8,000 to 10,000 visitors.

“This ruling is an incredible victory for the flora and fauna that rely on Wolf Creek pass for their survival,” stated Tehri Parker, Executive Director of Rocky Mountain Wild. “This order specifically recognizes the ‘unique’ environmental qualities of this region, and the role that it plays as a wildlife movement corridor between the Weminuche and South San Juan Wilderness areas. We couldn’t be happier with this outcome and getting this great news on Endangered Species Day!”

The Court rejected the Forest Service conclusion that it lacked any control over the use of the private parcel. The Court explained that “there is no legal or logical basis for Defendants’ position in the FEIS and ROD that the Forest Service had no power or jurisdiction to limit or regulate development on the federal lands being conveyed to LMJV in the present exchange.” The Court was troubled by the fact that the Forest Service previously conditioned use of the original parcel created in 1986 “with a scenic easement that limited development.”

Judge Matsch was also concerned with the fact that “development resulting from the Forest Service’s approval of the land exchange will adversely impact an endangered species, yet fails to comply with the statutory requirements for the protection of that species.” The species the Court was referring to is the Federally listed Canada lynx which would have been harmed had the Village construction and operation commenced.

If anyone desires more...just let the snob know!
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Wed 24 May 2017, 15:30:43

So, it's capitalism's fault for all the problems with failing to protect resources?

So overpopulation, people wanting to maximize their own spending and borrowing without regard for the planet, war, corruption, stupidity, and on and on have NOTHING to do with that?

So if we had another system like socialism, people could breed and consume endlessly and there would be no negative consequences?

If you believe that, get help.

If that's not the gist, then what does all this have to do with "The Capitalism Thread"?
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby onlooker » Wed 24 May 2017, 15:44:25

Not just Capitalism but facets of the Western world view
Western world view flawed


http://www.resilience.org/stories/2017- ... worldview/

A House on Shaky Ground: Eight Structural Flaws of the Western Worldview
“"If you think the economy is more important than the environment, try holding your breath while counting your money"”
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby asg70 » Wed 24 May 2017, 16:42:43

onlooker wrote:Not just Capitalism but facets of the Western world view


Remember that it was China that felt compelled to institute the one-child-policy. Overshoot is baked into nature itself, hence the phrase "are humans smarter than yeast"?
Hubbert's curve, meet S-curve: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Wed 24 May 2017, 17:22:42

Image
I find that the current discussion is circling around the truth. However it is time that we land and commence tearing off chunks and swallowing.
Image
First, those that seek to "preserve" things by making them off limits to other people, simply hasten the demise of what they seek to protect. Nor does the desire to protect something possess any virtue of itself, there cannot be any group, seperate from the others, with access to the forbidden areas.

Second, making a natural wonder open to all does not diminish it. As human populations grow, our "fair share" of everything, including the air we breathe and the water we drink, and especially the remaining Wilderness, shrinks. I favor protecting such resources via development, because as Hawk and EG noted, the shallow impacts of a great many people are easy enough to manage, and still preserve the more remote areas for those few who are willing to make the effort.
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Re: THE Capitalism Thread Pt. 4

Unread postby ralfy » Wed 24 May 2017, 19:55:41

Outcast_Searcher wrote:So, it's capitalism's fault for all the problems with failing to protect resources?

So overpopulation, people wanting to maximize their own spending and borrowing without regard for the planet, war, corruption, stupidity, and on and on have NOTHING to do with that?

So if we had another system like socialism, people could breed and consume endlessly and there would be no negative consequences?

If you believe that, get help.

If that's not the gist, then what does all this have to do with "The Capitalism Thread"?


Actually, all of the points that you raised are connected to capitalism. Look up the Green Revolution, population trends, and ecological footprint vs. biocapacity, consumer spending and Model Ts, BRICS and emerging markets, Silent Spring, the history of the rise of global carbon emissions, the military-industrial complex coupled with blowback, low intensity conflict, etc., studies on companies that dominate the global economy, including food production and media, and policies such as structural adjustment, the formation of the Federal Reserve, the state of education in countries like the U.S., and more.

Also, the result that you gave for socialism is actually the goal of capitalism.
http://sites.google.com/site/peakoilreports/
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