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Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

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Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby braveb » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 02:04:27

So I'll finish by associates degree at a 2 year state "university" system, acquiring nearly 70 credits in liberal arts and science classes. Despite what some people will say on higher education, I felt it was worth the time and money. While I would like to go on and study more to get a bachelors, I fear that my current skill, knowing how to drive an 18 wheeler, isn't exactly a secure long term skill. I'm making a decent wage today(most 25 year-olds don't break over 45,000), but I don't think that this income will be around 15 years from now. It is strange, however, that despite the economic collapse, truck driving is still a job that's available in just about every city.

Knowing this, what types of associate degrees are the most valuable as we are entering the age of peak oil? Utility engineering technician? Industrial welding? Diesel mechanic(related to trucking, but still might be useful)?

I want to avoid the "bullshit" stuff like EMT, chemical/clinical lab technician, web page development,...etc.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby StargazerNE » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 10:35:02

So I'll finish by associates degree at a 2 year state "university" system, acquiring nearly 70 credits in liberal arts and science classes.


So what is your major? Is it just a general degree that you can transfer to a four-year school?

Knowing this, what types of associate degrees are the most valuable as we are entering the age of peak oil? Utility engineering technician? Industrial welding? Diesel mechanic(related to trucking, but still might be useful)?

I want to avoid the "bullshit" stuff like EMT, chemical/clinical lab technician, web page development,...etc.


What exactly do you mean by "bullshit" stuff? I could maybe see how a web page developer may be pretty useless in the age of peak oil, but not the other three occupations. Do you not think the medical field will be around when oil is expensive? You just stated that even after the economic collapse that truck-driving jobs could still be found everywhere. I think the medical profession will be just fine for the most part.

I just graduated from a clinical (medical) laboratory technology program last month. I have a job that makes $39,000/year that was waiting for me when I graduated. The other 12 people in the program also have jobs within two months of graduating. That's not too shabby for a "bullshit" occupation in the middle of a recession (I would also like to mention that the job market for MLT/MT's is considered tight in our area). I knew about peak oil two years before starting the program and I did my research on the occupation. The average age of an MLT/MT is lower fifties. A huge number will be retiring in the next ten years and the occupation is supposed to grow without taking into account all of those retirements. Even if the need for MLT/MT's dropped off dramatically, there would still be more than enough open slots out there.

As far as chemical lab technicians, I think a lot of them will be okay also. I know quite a few because the clinical and chemical lab programs at our college share the same prerequisites. Many of the chem techs that graduate from our program end up in public utilities. I think those jobs are pretty safe for now. Afterall, doesn't everyone need clean drinking water?

I just thought I would get my two cents in for all of the "bullshit" occupations :)
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 11:43:44

braveb wrote:Knowing this, what types of associate degrees are the most valuable as we are entering the age of peak oil? Utility engineering technician? Industrial welding? Diesel mechanic(related to trucking, but still might be useful)?


This probably isn't what you want to hear, but it is important, so I'll say it anyway.

The most important financial decision you can make is NOT what type of job you get. It is how you live, from a financial standpoint.

Living below your means will be extremely important in the age of peak oil. In America, this is something few people seem to realize, and why so many are in financial trouble.

Whether you collect garbage or work on Wall Street - you need to put away a substantial proportion of your pretax wealth into some sort of diversified investments, possibly including "prep" investments.

Reading the old but wise "Money and Class in America" is great psychological prep for this, IMO. "The Millionaire Next Door" is also excellent in this regard.

I keep reading about how so many 50-somethings are in financial trouble very shortly after they get laid off. This is just CRAZY and is their own fault. They should be practically ready to RETIRE for crying out loud.

I keep reading about how people have to spend every nickel they earn to "survive". For anyone above the poverty line, this is also crazy. This poor planning and decision making, NOT a need to survive.

In EVERY documentary I see where people end up in a big financial box after layoffs, if they are middle aged they made BAD decisions when their salaries/positions increased and didn't save (but bought bigger houses, traveled extensively, etc. etc). Of course, the liberal documentaries ALWAYS minimize their lack of planning and act like they were just unlucky -- like a clean living young cancer victim.

Make your FIRST "degree"/priority about common sense saving/investing as an ongoing lifestyle decision. Over time, peak oil or not, you'll almost certainly be glad you did. And if you start out right before you start acquiring lots of stupid status symbol "stuff", you'll hardly even notice the missing "stuff".

I retired at 48, sick of the corporate stupidity and pressure. Having this choice was worth a thousand times more to me than any stupid status symbol. I'm not "rich", but by living simply, I'm more secure financially than 99% or so of folks, from what I read. And I get enough cases of beer from grateful friends thanking me for getting them to start saving early, or to buy a house they could comfortably afford a 15 year mortgage on instead of maxing out on housing expenses -- that I'm pretty comfortable giving this general strategic advice.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby Narz » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 14:16:45

I want to avoid the "bullshit" stuff like EMT, chemical/clinical lab technician, web page development,...etc.

Those sound pretty important/good potential IMO.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby braveb » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 15:09:26

Well then, it appears that I was wrong about the clinical lab technician.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby braveb » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 15:18:07

Outcast_Searcher wrote:
This probably isn't what you want to hear, but it is important, so I'll say it anyway.

The most important financial decision you can make is NOT what type of job you get. It is how you live, from a financial standpoint.

Living below your means will be extremely important in the age of peak oil.


Yes, I totally agree. It took me a few years to figure out how to live cheaply and stop the impulses to buy expensive electronics. Keeping a diary of expenses for a month is very illuminating. If it wasn't for philosophy and literature, I don't think I would've developed into being a cheapskate.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby TreeFarmer » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 17:29:53

I will throw out an idea and let's see what everyone thinks of it.

Perhaps a way to evaluate which skills will be valuable in a post peak society is to look for those skills that are valuable/in-demand in the less developed countries. My logic is that since they don't have excess money to be throwing at "less valuable" skills or degrees like religous studies, those skills/degrees that are useful are the ones that will be evident.

With that said, medicine is probably a good idea, as are the technoloogical skills from agriculture to welding to engineering.

Just throwing out some ideas;

TF
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby SeaGypsy » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 19:02:08

Since going into an apprenticeship in nursing I have had no problem getting $50k+ jobs. Previously in the arts, this was a real struggle and the jobs required a minimum 12 month committment.
A lot of it seems to come down to the personality of the individual concerned.
I doubt anyone really knows what will be happening in the 10 to 15 year time frame specified though.
A lot of superfluous jobs will evaporate. I am meeting a lot of IT professionals and qualified writers who are either unable to find a job or are working for peanuts.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby Carlhole » Sun 18 Jul 2010, 23:28:50

When I worked for Merrill Lynch back in the 90's, the research department would constantly remind us that all you had to do to make reasonably accurate long-term economic forecasts (at least pertaining to the US) was to observe the Baby Boom generation. Thus huge hump of affluent population influences everything according to the particular life-phase they are moving through.

This generation is now hitting retirement age. So, naturally, recently, we've seen especial emphasis on healthcare and managing the problems associated with aging and all that.

Think about this. There will be a variety of good job areas in the next 10 - 15 years, most of which will be linked to this boom generation phenomenon. Nursing is an obvious beneficiary of this trend.

But the self-absorbed Baby Boomers have always rebelled against the ways of their parents. They will want to transcend and conquer the classical problems associated with growing older. Whether this is realistic or not is beside the point.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby frankthetank » Mon 19 Jul 2010, 09:25:58

Can't go wrong with the medical field, although i think our local market is getting near the point where its becoming saturated because of the amt of younger people that have entered the field and the fact that the old people won't stop working! People that would normally retire just continue to work because of this or that (financial/boredom/they like it?) . This is what i see locally, so i don't know about other areas. This town is almost built on healthcare (Mayo/Gunderson).

One thing i'm seeing or seems to be taking place is something i first noticed in the war in Iraq, and that is private companies doing things that use to be done by the government (hired soldiers). This whole thing of privatizing profit while socializing losses seems to be gaining strength. One of the fastest growing local companies does healthcare work for the government...which i'm guessing use to be done by government employees. Now a select few are making a bundle, while the majority are making peanuts... With this new government healthcare plan, you have to imagine things are going to change.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby SeaGypsy » Mon 19 Jul 2010, 11:01:49

Isn't the paradoxical nature of humanity profound?
Some freak Guru years ago said 'as we reach the zenith everything fundamental will intesify whilst everything superfluouse will wane',
Carlhole; I thank you for these profound words of wisdom.
Frank; I uphold your sense of dignity as a right even for an utter cannibal.
Godbless us all; for we are all (almost) equally F$#ked.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby MarkJ » Tue 20 Jul 2010, 07:48:11

The majority of our family work as medical professionals. None have any problems finding full time jobs, second part-time jobs, or private duty gigs.

Even much of the work we perform in the commercial construction, fuel and HVAC/R business is providing services for hospitals, extended care facilities, adult care facilities, retarded care facilities.

The largest local employers are businesses that care for retarded clients.

The majority of my tenants work in the health care industry, or supporting industries as well.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby SeaGypsy » Tue 20 Jul 2010, 11:15:29

Today I made $200 plus after tax for: spending 2 hours sitting with a brain damaged guy who has no short term memory but photographic long term memory, making a quadraplegic lady dinner and putting another quadraplegic guy to bed for the night with a bit of physio. An entertaining day, lots of breaks.
Easiest job I've ever had, home care nursing, can become like visiting a friend who needs a bit of help and getting paid very nicely for it.
Of course I am not talking Wall Street wages, but plenty enough for my needs and those of my small family.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby davep » Tue 20 Jul 2010, 12:39:37

SeaGypsy wrote:Today I made $200 plus after tax for: spending 2 hours sitting with a brain damaged guy who has no short term memory but photographic long term memory, making a quadraplegic lady dinner and putting another quadraplegic guy to bed for the night with a bit of physio. An entertaining day, lots of breaks.
Easiest job I've ever had, home care nursing, can become like visiting a friend who needs a bit of help and getting paid very nicely for it.
Of course I am not talking Wall Street wages, but plenty enough for my needs and those of my small family.


Today I earned $700 for sitting in an office looking busy. I'm one of the few IT Professionals still earning decent money. I don't kid myself that it's because I'm better than the rest, I just happened to find a cushy number with a European quango. God knows what I'll do when it ends in 18 months. I'm still looking towards the farming angle, but my wife is getting more insistent about moving from the sticks to a more 'normal' suburban environment.

Either the sh*t will hit the fan personally or she'll follow me as she has always done over the past 19 years. It's tough planning for the future with no buy-in from your family :cry:
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby pup55 » Tue 20 Jul 2010, 14:15:33

The most important financial decision you can make is NOT what type of job you get. It is how you live, from a financial standpoint.


Warning: Possible boring content on life-skills from someone old enough to be your dad.... who has no business advising anyone at anything....Click "next" to skip

1. I agree totally with the above. Live below your means.

2. Be careful with your choice of spouse/life partner. Nothing will FU your life faster than getting into a long term contract with someone who is not aligned with your priorities. Get a pre-nup, even if you are penniless, spelling out the expectations of both parties, including kids or lack of, work expectations, roles in the family, possible relocation, weight gain (not induced by some medical condition) and importantly, what happens after the kids are grown up and hit the road. If your spouse/partner candidate refuses, or whines "if you really love me we will not need to do this" dump them summarily, because you do need to do that, for no other reason than to set out expectations.

3. If you have not already done so, review Jonathon Pond's theory of motor vehicle purchase, which is, try as much as possible to avoid borrowing money to buy a motor vehicle, or other depreciating asset. This goes for houses, if the houses in your area are continuing to depreciate in value.

4. Keep your overhead low. By "overhead" I mean all types of maintenance expenses and anything else that causes you to have to pay to keep your little system running. Examples: debt, student loan debt, expensive-to-operate vehicles and that kind of thing. Also if you have a lot of junk in your life, get rid of it. It's expensive to store a lot of junk, you have to pay for storage space and you can't take it with you.

5. Learn a new skill every year. It doesn't matter what skill, nor should you necessarily expect to ever make a dime doing it. You do not even need to reach the level of "competent", but one of the worst things you can do is to get mentally stagnant. Suggestion: if you have not already done so, it is useful to learn two things early in your life: accounting, with some focus on the time-value of money, and automotive repair.

6. There is no such thing as a stable company. There is no such thing as a loyal boss. You can work diligently at your job and literally be working for a competitor the following day. There is no such thing as a "guaranteed bonus" Anybody can be fired for any reason whatsoever, including being "too good" at what you do. This goes for any job, including medical. Get everything in writing.

7. Career Training: Do not make the assumption that the people down at the student placement center have the slightest clue as to what the economy is going to be like many years from now. The following things did not exist on a widespread basis when Pops and I were 25, back in the dinosaur era: The internet, cellphones, most types of electronic gadgets including the one you are looking at right now, cable TV, VCR's, microwave ovens, MRI machines, arthroscopic surgery, and AIDS. In light of this, plan your career on a 5-year timeframe, and do not hesitate to change fields at least a couple of times before you are 35. Keeping your overhead low is a really good way to ensure that you can comfortably do this without starving out.

8. Be an intern somewhere, even if briefly, and even if you have to work like a dog and get squat out of it. You will be able to look at people in the organization at various ages and levels, and find out what they did to get to where they are, and make the determination whether or not you like it, and figure out a logical career path. Do this particularly if your parents or significant role models in your life are clueless. Note: If the people in your life rag you for doing this, tell them to stick it.

9. When you go into your job interview, listen to see if you hear any laughter in the halls. If you don't, apply somewhere else, if you possibly can. I did a Yahoo Jobs search the other day for the word "fun" and it gave me an error message. If you aren't having fun, it really will seem like work, and it will shorten your life. Keeping your overhead low will allow you to fire an employer if you choose to for having a stuffy workplace.

10. Stay in shape. Run, or walk, at least one 5K per year, preferably on the same day every year, and record your time in your family bible, if you have one. It's much cheaper than going to the doctor, and will give you an annual benchmark of your general health. Yeah, you'll get slower once you reach middle age, but part of keeping your overhead low is avoiding medical problems, depression, and a lot of other things that can be remedied by staying in shape.

Ten is enough advice. There is a story behind everything I said above....
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby davep » Tue 20 Jul 2010, 16:34:15

pup55 wrote:2. Be careful with your choice of spouse/life partner. Nothing will FU your life faster than getting into a long term contract with someone who is not aligned with your priorities.


Now he tells me... :evil:
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby Oakley » Tue 20 Jul 2010, 17:10:52

Undertaker.

Why?

Baby boomers bubble will start to reach death age. Social Security and Medicare failure will result in pressure to die for those dependent upon it. Obamacare will up the death rate as the quality and availability of health care wanes. And peak oil should bring on peak population; imagine if net oil production is cut in half over the next 15 years what that will do to the death rate.

Second choice would be manufacturer of cheap coffins.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby davep » Tue 20 Jul 2010, 17:20:27

Oakley wrote:Undertaker.

Why?

Baby boomers bubble will start to reach death age. Social Security and Medicare failure will result in pressure to die for those dependent upon it. Obamacare will up the death rate as the quality and availability of health care wanes. And peak oil should bring on peak population; imagine if net oil production is cut in half over the next 15 years what that will do to the death rate.

Second choice would be manufacturer of cheap coffins.


Scary. My next door neighbour (OK, 200 yards away, but he's still my next door neighbour) makes coffins for an undertaker. Apparently he also digs graves. He's only about 5'6" but is just as wide. And he's not fat.

There are two families that dominate our hamlet, and they don't get on. We're stuck between the two feuding families. If things went bad, I know that at least one set will survive. I just don't know if they'd fancy dragging us along with them. But they also know I'm armed to the teeth and probably think I'm more than a bit crazy. That earns the kind of respect/wariness that may just see us through the dark days should they arrive.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby SilentRunning » Tue 20 Jul 2010, 17:43:54

TreeFarmer wrote:Perhaps a way to evaluate which skills will be valuable in a post peak society is to look for those skills that are valuable/in-demand in the less developed countries. My logic is that since they don't have excess money to be throwing at "less valuable" skills or degrees like religous studies,....
TF


I will speak out in defense of "religious studies" - but be sure that the religion selected meets the following criteria:

1) It is readily recognizable to the community in question
2) It provides hope and comfort for those suffering from loss
3) It links happiness in the afterlife with maintaining of its priestly caste (aka: you)
4) It links happiness in the afterlife with following the dictates of the political elite.

After becoming a priest of the selected religion, go to the local political/economic elite - and point out item 4 as an integral part of your teachings and ask for their support with founding/maintaining your church.

This is an almost sure fire recipe for success as a religious leader in almost all times and places.
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Re: Best jobs for the next 10-15 years

Unread postby Ainan » Mon 26 Jul 2010, 22:59:06

Major props to Outcast and Pups. I've met people who earn 120k a year and are broke and people who earn 50-60k a year doing fruit picking and manage to save 40k a year since accomodation is practically free.

One of the most important financial rules is 'pay yourself first'. I won't go into it, people can google up, but even though I'm 12,000 miles from home and only doing cash in hand odd jobs at the moment I still have a seperate bank account to put 10% of what I earn in. At the moment it only has $30. There's not much difference between surviving on $270 and $300. But saving $30 every week or so makes a big difference long term. It doesn't matter how much you earn, only how much you save. Should be able to add $50 into my 'investment' account next week. :-D There's a young economist on po.com who saves like 80%? of his income, hopefully he can give us all some advice.

This thread has got me thinking about investing in bush retirement homes for hippy boomers.
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