Page 2 of 2

Re: Cyclone/Hurricane/Typhoon Season 2017

Unread postPosted: Mon 31 Jul 2017, 23:07:54
by dohboi
“Two storms make landfall in Taiwan

In a very rare weather scenario, Typhoon Nesat and Tropical Storm Haitang bring over a metre of water to Taiwan”

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpict ... 59339.html


http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/31/us/florid ... index.html

Tropical Storm Emily downgraded as it moves across Florida


The Gov announced a state of emergency.

Elsewhere:

"Supertyphoon #Noru is now a Category 5 w/ max winds of 160 mph - the 1st Cat. 5 hurricane/typhoon of the 2017 Northern Hemisphere TC season."
With radar loop: https://twitter.com/philklotzbach/statu ... 6411003904

"Hugely powerful Category 5 Super Typhoon #Noru has rapidly intensified over the last day or so. May impact southern Japan in about 7 days."
https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status ... 0656909312

"Seriously, this is a beautiful storm.
For now, #Noru is safely out at sea. This 3-min resolution satellite loop will not disappoint."
https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status ... 9909403649

"As it looks right now, Super Typhoon #Noru could rival some of the strongest landfalls ever recorded in Japan.
Please watch this one closely"
https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status ... 6381516805

Re: Cyclone/Hurricane/Typhoon Season 2017

Unread postPosted: Wed 09 Aug 2017, 11:32:04
by vox_mundi
This Hurricane Season May Generate as Many as 19 Atlantic Storms

The Atlantic hurricane season will probably end with an above-average 14 to 19 named storms that can rattle energy and agriculture markets now that it is almost certain a system-deterring Pacific El Nino won’t arrive.

At least 5 to 9 will become hurricanes with 2 to 5 becoming major systems with winds of 111 miles (179 kilometers) per hour or more, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a conference call with reporters Wednesday. Storms are named when their winds reach 39 mph. In May, the agency said 11 to 17 storms would form.

“There is a possibility now that the season will be extremely active,” said Gerry Bell, lead hurricane seasonal forecaster at the U.S. Climate Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland. “We are now entering the historical peak months of the season. This three month period is when the bulk of hurricanes occur.

The tropical Atlantic is about 1 to 2 degrees Fahrenheit (0.5 to 1.1 Celsius) warmer than normal, which can spur on hurricane development, Bell said. Tropical storms and hurricanes draw strength from warm water.

They aren’t the warmest temperatures on record but they are certainly sufficient,” Bell said. “These conducive conditions are in place and we expect them to persist.”

Starting around Aug. 20, the Atlantic enters its most active phase that lasts about six weeks. The statistical peak of the season is Sept. 10.