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Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 20 Dec 2016, 19:10:54
by ritter
@Vox,

I've always felt that feeding ourselves will be the real problem with climate change, not heat, drought, deluge and sea level rise. While challenging in their own ways, those are mere symptoms of our shortsightedness. Thanks for posting this.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 20 Dec 2016, 19:25:53
by pstarr
The Dust bowl had nothing to do with GW, and little to do with drought. It was about over planting, over fertilization, over production and a chance few bad years of rain deficit. The Industrial Revolution in the grain belt was new, and folks had no idea how to deal with recurrent whether changes. There is not going to be another dust bowl in the US. we are smarter than that.

Post peak, the Great Plains will return to the bison, antelope, and the few brave warrior white folks who take up residence there.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 20 Dec 2016, 22:31:03
by clif
we are smarter than that.


beg to differ,

remember we have elected a narcissistic carnival barker for pResident

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 20 Dec 2016, 23:54:34
by pstarr
clif wrote:
we are smarter than that.


beg to differ,

remember we have elected a narcissistic carnival barker for pResident

America's professional farmers feed much of the world. They are competent and rely on good science. This has nothing to do with Trump. Trump is a sideshow barker. He has his hand in your pocket. You are the mark.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 13 Mar 2017, 09:05:55
by dohboi
Queensland in highest level of drought ever recorded there

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-13/d ... ns/8349056

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 13 Mar 2017, 23:29:52
by dohboi
Drought, Deforestation Set to Propel Vicious Amazon Die Off

Thirty-eight percent of the Amazon Basin is at risk due to a self-amplifying process of drought and forest die off — which is made worse by industrial-scale agricultural production.


Reduced rainfall across the Amazon basin is causing large areas of forests to die, which could be amplifying drought conditions across the region.

Researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research believe that this process, known as self-amplifying forest loss, could cause a vicious circle of drought and further forest loss across the Amazon region, according to a study published in Nature Communications.


http://www.seeker.com/drought-deforesta ... 72248.html

and now...this...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_cont ... sIB81sLe2w

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Tue 21 Mar 2017, 21:28:02
by dohboi
Surprise, surprise...

India is still in trouble:

https://robertscribbler.com/2017/03/21/ ... ry-season/

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Thu 23 Mar 2017, 12:21:09
by dohboi
Under the Dead Sea, warnings of dire drought

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 143139.htm

Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans — a possible warning for current times.

Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as a fifth of modern levels some 120,000 years ago, and again about 10,000 years ago.

“All the observations show this region is one of those most affected by modern climate change, and it’s predicted to get dryer. What we showed is that even under natural conditions, it can become much drier than predicted by any of our models,” said lead author Yael Kiro, a geochemist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Sun 26 Mar 2017, 05:34:21
by dohboi
Villagers in northern Kenya have begun to burn piles of animal carcasses, hoping to head off an outbreak of disease as their livestock starve to death in the region’s worst drought in five years.

The smell of death hangs heavily over Lake Turkana and dried animal corpses dot the cracked mud where the lake has receded, leaving boats stranded on the dry land.

https://widerimage.reuters.com/story/dr ... -carcasses

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 19 Apr 2017, 16:13:01
by dohboi
It's been very dry in the UK, and the first stirrings of concern are emerging.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04 ... er-driest/

And then there's:

Historic Calif. Drought Wreaked Irreversible, Bizarre Damage
Central Valley sank 3 feet—and won’t be rebounding


Snowmelt and rain are in abundance for the first time in years in Central Valley, Calif., which boasts so much farmland it helps feed much of the world. But the state’s five-year drought was so bad that all those farms sucked up enough groundwater to sink a solid three feet, thereby reducing the region’s water storage capacity, reports a new study out of Stanford University.

“California is getting all of this rain, but in the Central Valley, there has been a loss of space to store it,” says a researcher tells Courthouse News; they used satellite technology to precisely calculate the changes in elevation. “When too much water is taken out of clay, its structure is rearranged at the microscopic level and it settles into a new configuration that has less storage space.


http://www.newser.com/story/241443/cali ... ought.html

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 19 Apr 2017, 16:55:10
by pstarr
    Historic Calif. Drought Wreaked Irreversible, Bizarre Damage
    Central Valley sank 3 feet—and won’t be rebounding
A bit of perspective from the original journal paper (with apologies to dohboi for stealing his doom :-x ): Water Resources Research
This subsidence represents a permanent loss in groundwater storage. Using these methods, we estimated that a permanent loss of 7.48 × 108 m3 of groundwater storage occurred during our study period. This accounted for roughly 9% of groundwater pumping in our study area. While this is just a small fraction of the total water stored underground in this area, this 'water of compaction' is an important safeguard for times of drought that, once removed, cannot be replenished.
So 1/5 cubic mile of storage, a few thousand sq.ft. of a particular clay in one little area in the San Joaquin Valley was permanently lost. Note to humans: there are a myriad clay types, in and around a endless different geological structures in the Central Valley. This particular study focused on one area in the San Joaquin already known to have aquifer problems.

Take-away: learn the truth, do not rely on suspect/hysterical advertiser-driven headlines in mainstream press dribble.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 19 Apr 2017, 17:18:14
by dohboi
Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Postby dohboi » Wed Apr 19, 2017 3:13 pm
It's been very dry in the UK, and the first stirrings of concern are emerging.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04 ... er-driest/

And then there's:

Historic Calif. Drought Wreaked Irreversible, Bizarre Damage
Central Valley sank 3 feet—and won’t be rebounding


Snowmelt and rain are in abundance for the first time in years in Central Valley, Calif., which boasts so much farmland it helps feed much of the world. But the state’s five-year drought was so bad that all those farms sucked up enough groundwater to sink a solid three feet, thereby reducing the region’s water storage capacity, reports a new study out of Stanford University.

“California is getting all of this rain, but in the Central Valley, there has been a loss of space to store it,” says a researcher tells Courthouse News; they used satellite technology to precisely calculate the changes in elevation. “When too much water is taken out of clay, its structure is rearranged at the microscopic level and it settles into a new configuration that has less storage space.


Reposted this, because I'm trying to figure out if there is any bit of the factual information presented here that p is directly denying...or if he just is hand waving because he objects to some imagined tone or attitude in it or in me...

Oh, wait a minute...I just realized....

I don't care... :-D :-D :-D

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 19 Apr 2017, 18:15:06
by pstarr
You should care. You posted crap. The lying idiot headline and completely wrong article based on slightly interesting story? Which you bothered to promote?

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Wed 19 Apr 2017, 18:41:17
by pstarr
Shouldn't the nonsense be in the "Most Deadly Killer California Horrible Drought" thread?

Nah That would reveal the nonsense.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 24 Apr 2017, 07:54:19
by vox_mundi
Somali Pirates Being Driven Back to the Seas by Drought and Famine: U.S. Commander

Pirates in Somalia are being driven to the seas by a devastating drought, says the top U.S. military commander in Africa.

General Thomas Waldhauser, the head of the U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), said food shortages in Somalia were contributing to the resurgence in piracy.

About three million Somalis face food insecurity or famine and a national disaster was declared last month.

US Defence Secretary Jim Mattis expressed concerns about the resurgence of Somali piracy during a visit to the American military base in Djibouti.

One reason for the increase in the attacks is famine and droughts in the region, as some of the vessels targeted were carrying food and oil, Gen Waldhauser told a press conference.

Somalia is one of four countries and over 20 million people in Africa and the Middle East identified by the United Nations as currently at risk of extreme hunger and famine.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 24 Apr 2017, 08:23:47
by Revi
Looks like the worst drought area is the Smoky Mountains and North Georgia right now.
The west looks like it's pretty much out of drought for right now.

Meanwhile a new El Nino is forming in the Pacific way ahead of schedule.

We'll see...

http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/RegionalDroughtMonitor.aspx

Check out a year ago. Severe drought in the Southwest.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 24 Apr 2017, 11:24:51
by pstarr
California has been out of drought for two years, in spite of suspect metrics and endlessly repeated media.

Rain season 2015-2016 was normal.This 2016-2017 rain season breaks historical records. There never was proven aquifer damage (see article above). I predicted and asked for a wager back in Oct. 2016 that even the official 'red-scare' drought would be over around the first of the year. It was. In spite of the 'red-scare' drought monitor bs maps.

Does anyone remember color-coded anti-terrorism signs at the airports after 9/11. Orange scare, red scare, just a yellow scare. My tiny little airport had ragged dirty orange-scare placard out for years. a joke. The PTB and the advertising industry like it when the consumer is nervous. It's proven, they buy crap. Just like the california drought scare. :(

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 24 Apr 2017, 12:08:35
by Newfie
Patience Pete. Let's see what things look like in 10-20 years.

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 24 Apr 2017, 12:26:44
by pstarr
Newfie wrote:Patience Pete. Let's see what things look like in 10-20 years.

fossil fuels add CO2 to the atmosphere. CO2 is a plant nutrient, and so CO2 photosynthetic take-up increases. We now have proof of this. There was just a several decade delay in the apparent take up of excessive CO2. The planet is not on the same deadline as the nightly news. The planet is patient lol, like me. I like the greening. You should see it in California. It's like Hawaii everywhere!

Re: The Drought Thread Pt. 4

Unread postPosted: Mon 24 Apr 2017, 12:35:58
by Newfie
Piracy and drought. A sobering viewpoint.

http://gcaptain.com/no-u-s-military-res ... ys-mattis/