Page 5 of 5

Re: What is the top killer? Wars? Epidemics? Suicides? Drugs

Unread postPosted: Sat 21 Oct 2017, 17:22:34
by onlooker
A marked sign of our tremendous negative impact on this planet. This also undoubtedly is greatly affecting non human species as well. Not surprising that it was included in the limits to growth scenarios of back in the seventies. Those folks did a magnificently thorough study on the Limits to Growth

Re: What is the top killer? Wars? Epidemics? Suicides? Drugs

Unread postPosted: Sat 21 Oct 2017, 19:08:29
by pstarr
dohboi wrote:"...clean water and waste water treatment"

In other words...pollution...thanks. :-D

I think of pollution as toxic chemicals. Human waste treated properly is a nutrient, like any natural compost. It's the pathogens in improperly treated waste that kill.

Re: What is the top killer? Wars? Epidemics? Suicides? Drugs

Unread postPosted: Sat 21 Oct 2017, 19:32:26
by SeaGypsy
If you knew the process you could get high off sewage. The authorities use it to track drug use, as most of the drugs humans use end up in the toilet. Funny that.

Re: What is the top killer? Wars? Epidemics? Suicides? Drugs

Unread postPosted: Tue 24 Oct 2017, 10:38:00
by evilgenius
SeaGypsy wrote:If you knew the process you could get high off sewage. The authorities use it to track drug use, as most of the drugs humans use end up in the toilet. Funny that.


Antibiotics being one of those. We should worry about their overuse. We should worry about whether the form they are in when they go down the toilet allows bacteria exposure that makes them resistant, and whether those exposed bacteria communicate well enough with other bacteria outside of that environment. I know you drive for a living like I do, SeaGypsy. I deliver drugs to nursing homes. Unlike how, when I used to work around x-ray film years ago, there was a collector for waste silver in the drain, there is no collector for what old people are putting out. Those things are super concentrated in those environments. You gotta wonder.

Re: climate change "existential" threat to humanity

Unread postPosted: Sun 29 Oct 2017, 22:56:21
by dohboi
This is not exclusively on cc, but it does show there plenty of other threats to humanity (and much of the rest of planetary life) beyond cc:

Pollution’s Annual Price Tag?

$4.6 Trillion and 9 Million Dead


by John Tozzi, Bloomberg News

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... llion-dead

Re: Pollution Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Mon 20 Nov 2017, 16:45:58
by onlooker
Seems India is overtaking China as world's top polluting country
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-14639-8

Re: Pollution Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Sun 03 Dec 2017, 14:15:28
by dohboi
"A cricket Test match between India and Sri Lanka was repeatedly interrupted on Sunday with claims players were “continuously vomiting” due to hazardous pollution levels in the Indian capital."

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/ ... to-breathe

Re: Pollution Pt. 2

Unread postPosted: Thu 07 Dec 2017, 23:18:10
by onlooker
Light pollution
Outdoor lighting is regarded as a necessity, especially in highly populated areas, but artificial night-lights are an environmental pollutant, disrupting processes such as light-dark cycles in nocturnal animals—those that are active at night—and affecting plants and microorganisms. Prolonged exposure to artificial night-lights has also been suspected in affecting our health and sleep patterns
.
https://www.gotscience.org/2017/12/arti ... -brighter/

How the oil industry set out to undercut clean air

Unread postPosted: Thu 14 Dec 2017, 22:27:24
by AdamB
On sunny days, when his classmates run out to play, Gabriel Rosales heads to the school nurse for a dose of Albuterol. The fine mist opens his airways, relaxing the muscles in his chest. Without it, recess could leave the nine-year-old gasping for breath. He gets a second dose at the end of the day before heading home from St John Bosco Elementary School, in San Antonio, Texas. How big oil is tightening its grip on Donald Trump's White House Over the past year, Gabriel’s asthma has worsened. Visits to the emergency room, shortened trips to the park and reliance on inhalers have become his new norm. “It got to the point where I couldn’t even leave him with anybody,” said his father, Gabe, who works as a consultant to the National Association of Public Employees, a workers’ advocacy group, and a seasonal


How the oil industry set out to undercut clean air