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New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

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New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby kublikhan » Fri 18 May 2012, 17:05:02

Delphi, a major parts supplier to automakers, is developing an engine technology that could improve the fuel economy of gas-powered cars by 50 percent, potentially rivaling the performance of hybrid vehicles while costing less. A test engine based on the technology is similar in some ways to a highly efficient diesel engine, but runs on gasoline.

Delphi's approach, which is called gasoline-direct-injection compression ignition, aims to overcome the problem by combining a collection of engine-operating strategies that make use of advanced fuel injection and air intake and exhaust controls, many of which are available on advanced engines today. For example, the researchers found that if they injected the gasoline in three precisely timed bursts, they could avoid the too-rapid combustion that's made some previous experimental engines too noisy. At the same time, they could burn the fuel faster than in conventional gasoline engines, which is necessary for getting the most out of the fuel.

They used other strategies to help the engine perform well at extreme loads. For example, when the engine has just been started or is running at very low speeds, the temperatures in the combustion chamber can be too low to achieve combustion ignition. Under these conditions, the researchers directed exhaust gases into the combustion chamber to warm it up and facilitate combustion.
Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby efarmer » Tue 22 May 2012, 21:08:26

Now this is real American engineering at work. Our refineries, versus Europe's, were designed to get the highest fraction of petrol versus diesel, which is in fact, the reverse of European
refineries. This makes DI diesel German engine designs less than optimal for America.

The hybrid car, dragging along a weighty and expensive and finite battery and a gasoline
ICE is a very poor compromise versus people driving less, driving smaller, and using
innovations such as Delphi's work.

Why on earth we took truck designs and spun them to be luxury vehicles is beyond me, except that truck chassis got government exemptions and people would drive their house
to work if it had wheels on it.

The real innovation is when the internet tempers driving to where a paypal sort of thing
allows people to join a system that let's them real time ride share any and all the time and
more people get into one ICE vehicle to make trips. Poor people will of course use it immediately, and we are exactly who should. Rich people will use it if they ride share with rich or interesting people. People with other people in a confined space may kill Facebook as they will have real conversations and do real things together. Real community can be made by reducing the cost of fuel and transportation and changing the paradigm from a jillion single occupant vehicles going about. People with terminal farts and bitching will still have to walk, but it will do them a world of good, or do the people they are not riding with a world of good, and in any case a world of good will be done somehow.

Efarmer does a little bit of blue sky, even if just to prove he has some game in that vector.
Engine tech is good stuff and glad it is done. In my mind the real deal is a system of reducing the cost of driving and getting more human bods in each vehicle. It is the most bang for the buck and unit dose of petrol immediately and could really change the dynamic.
Someone needs to innovate a website for it and make it cool and easy and safe as possible, and become a billionaire so everyone jumps on board.

If government wishes to lead, put a big bag of swag and gumment cheese for getting a website off the ground to clear people's personal security and hook them up to rideshare with financial transactions preset on a paypal or other basis. Give tax breaks to people who save liquid fuels by participating and pull the stigma off of being a rubberneck in a single passenger vehicle both ways to work and home and network vehicle expense and ownership where it is cheap to drive and ride and we need less foreign and domestic oil, and give a boost to mass transit that links with the personal ride share network seamlessly as an adjunct or a backup. Let the oil companies finance the backbone to make money on reducing consumption by getting a few points for a ride and reducing their petroleum consumption.

I think we can do this America if we quit dividing up into two camps and making sure we both lose big time with wonderful excuses for knowing exactly why we lost, and whom to blame other than our dysfunctional relationships with each other.
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby kublikhan » Sat 04 Jan 2014, 21:03:24

Just an update on this technology. Good news is work is continuing and Delphi has partnered with Hyudai and the University of Wisconsin to develop a GDCI engine. And it will be cheaper than diesel engines. Bad news is the fuel savings expected are a more modest 25% instead of the initially reported 50%. And it still looks to be several years away from commercial production.

Hyundai is developing a gasoline-burning compression-ignition engine in conjunction with Delphi and the University of Wisconsin. Hyundai says that its under-development mill, which it calls GDCI (Gasoline Direct Compression Ignition), will achieve a 25 percent improvement in mileage compared to its current crop of spark-ignition gas engines. Unlike some other automakers’ previous attempts at gasoline-burning compression ignition, Hyundai will not fit the engine with any spark- or glow plugs.

The Korean automaker says that cost will be kept down in comparison to a diesel motor because its engine will use conventional solenoid injectors rather than the costly piezo units commonly found in today’s diesel engines. And Hyundai says that it can navigate around the cost of diesel engines’ high-pressure fuel pumps by running fuel pressures of less than 500 bar compared to a diesel unit’s 1800–2000-bar operating range.

Hyundai said that preliminary results have been “very, very promising.” At this stage, we remain some time away from seeing a production-spec product—if it happens at all—but Hyundai is confident that it will be selling cars powered by gasoline-burning compression-ignition engines within the next 10 years.
Hyundai Developing Gasoline-Burning Compression-Ignition Engine
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby kublikhan » Tue 08 Aug 2017, 10:47:26

Mazda Motor Corp said it would become the world's first automaker to commercialize a much more efficient petrol engine using technology that deep-pocketed rivals have been trying to engineer for decades, a twist in an industry increasingly going electric.

The new compression ignition engine is 20 percent to 30 percent more fuel efficient than the Japanese automaker's current engines and uses a technology that has eluded the likes of Daimler AG and General Motors Co. Mazda, with a research and development (R&D) budget a fraction of those of major peers, said it plans to sell cars with the new engine from 2019.

A homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine ignites petrol through compression, eliminating spark plugs. Its fuel economy potentially matches that of a diesel engine without high emissions of nitrogen oxides or sooty particulates.
Mazda announces breakthrough in long-coveted engine technology
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Tue 08 Aug 2017, 11:15:27

kublikhan wrote:
Mazda Motor Corp said it would become the world's first automaker to commercialize a much more efficient petrol engine using technology that deep-pocketed rivals have been trying to engineer for decades, a twist in an industry increasingly going electric.

The new compression ignition engine is 20 percent to 30 percent more fuel efficient than the Japanese automaker's current engines and uses a technology that has eluded the likes of Daimler AG and General Motors Co. Mazda, with a research and development (R&D) budget a fraction of those of major peers, said it plans to sell cars with the new engine from 2019.

A homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine ignites petrol through compression, eliminating spark plugs. Its fuel economy potentially matches that of a diesel engine without high emissions of nitrogen oxides or sooty particulates.
Mazda announces breakthrough in long-coveted engine technology

Sounds like great news. Couple this with a hybrid technology like Toyota's, and you could have mid sized cars getting over 60 mpg, real world. An even nicer bridge while the BEV fleet goes through its build-out S-curve.

Efficiency is aweseome. If governments want to be awarding incentives and tax credits, IMO, big increases in inefficiency in critical machinery that currently harms the environment would be an excellent place to look.
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby Tanada » Tue 08 Aug 2017, 22:16:27

I will believe it when they are mass produced and show greatly improved economy in real world driving conditions.

No offense but this is about the tenth time since 2005 I have seen a greatly more efficient ICE motor being touted as the wave of the future. We have had horizontal opposed, Crowder 6 cycle engines, double expansion 5 Stroke engines and a whole bunch of diesel and gasoline ;improvements' that would get us '30 to 50 percent better mileage' over and over and over.

Mass produce any of them and prove just how stinking good they are already! Heck prove multiple designs then combine the best features of each to get synergies in increased efficiency!
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby asg70 » Tue 08 Aug 2017, 22:23:25

HCCI has been on the horizon for a long time. The principles behind it are well-established. I don't think it's fantasy-land.
Hubbert's curve, meet S-curve: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby AdamB » Tue 08 Aug 2017, 22:27:19

kublikhan wrote:
Delphi, a major parts supplier to automakers, is developing an engine technology that could improve the fuel economy of gas-powered cars by 50 percent, potentially rivaling the performance of hybrid vehicles while costing less. A test engine based on the technology is similar in some ways to a highly efficient diesel engine, but runs on gasoline.

Delphi's approach, which is called gasoline-direct-injection compression ignition, aims to overcome the problem by combining a collection of engine-operating strategies that make use of advanced fuel injection and air intake and exhaust controls, many of which are available on advanced engines today. For example, the researchers found that if they injected the gasoline in three precisely timed bursts, they could avoid the too-rapid combustion that's made some previous experimental engines too noisy. At the same time, they could burn the fuel faster than in conventional gasoline engines, which is necessary for getting the most out of the fuel.

They used other strategies to help the engine perform well at extreme loads. For example, when the engine has just been started or is running at very low speeds, the temperatures in the combustion chamber can be too low to achieve combustion ignition. Under these conditions, the researchers directed exhaust gases into the combustion chamber to warm it up and facilitate combustion.
Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half


Interesting. I current own 2 direct injected cars, and I can say that they haven't increased efficiency over their normal throttle body/upstream of the valve injected by 50%.

CVT transmissions on the other hand...
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby kublikhan » Wed 09 Aug 2017, 00:24:13

AdamB wrote:Interesting. I current own 2 direct injected cars, and I can say that they haven't increased efficiency over their normal throttle body/upstream of the valve injected by 50%.

CVT transmissions on the other hand...
Only a portion of the increased efficiency in the Delphi-Hyundai engine was from the direct injection. Another big part was getting the cylinders to fire off with compression alone, no spark plugs. Like a diesel engine. And combining direct injection with a turbo, like the Ford ecoboost engine. There were numerous other areas that added a small efficiency gain here or there as well. And Hyundai is targeting more modest fuel savings than the original Delphi article: 25% better fuel economy.

In conventional gasoline-powered engines, a spark ignites a mixture of fuel and air. Diesel engines don’t use a spark. Instead, they compress air until it’s so hot that fuel injected into the combustion chamber soon ignites. Several researchers have attempted to use compression ignition with gasoline, but it’s proved challenging to control such engines, especially under the wide range of loads put on them as a car idles, accelerates, and cruises at various speeds.
Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Hyundai has revealed an ultra-efficient diesel engine, and although it’s a compression-ignition internal combustion engine — gasoline is its fuel. It has a common-rail fuel system, uses both a supercharger and turbocharger, and has diesel-like high compression. What it does not have is a spark plug or even a glow plug. According to Hyundai’s Nayan Engineer, “What we have is an ultra-efficient IC engine, a diesel compression-ignition engine running on gasoline.” What’s at stake is creating internal combustion engines that are clean, efficient, powerful and cost-efficient engines for the next 10 to 30 years.

Then there’s the turbos. While gas engines have toyed with turbos, and in the last decade about 15% of engines passenger car engines became turbocharged, modern diesels always use at least one, and often two turbos or an expensive variable-geometry turbocharger. You can see turbochargers gaining use as smaller engines nabbed the turbo advantage, then direct injection, to make a compact gas engine punch far above its weight. Ford’s EcoBoost engines are a great example, as are Hyundai’s GDI motors.

According to Engineer, “Gasoline doesn’t want to auto-ignite, diesel fuel does. Gas is locally slow (burning), locally lean.” The Hyundai chief says that to make this engine work there are several critical technologies, all enabled by modern turbos, injectors, and above all, modern engine computers.

In every phase of development, the team has also focused on friction reduction. This engine accomplishes many tiny efficiency gains, like 1 percent from a rollerized camshaft, 3 percent from rollerizing the cranktrain, 1 to 2 percent by recovering waste heat. They’ve optimized the two-stage oil pump and lowered the rpm limit to 5,000, coated piston rings with low-tension oil control rings, and coated the piston skirts. Even cooling the EGR offers a 3 percent improvement in efficiency.

If you’re wondering why all the bother to create a new class of engine you need look no further than the emissions regulations set to phase in next year. We’re betting we will see similar technology for small engines emerging from many automakers. For one, it makes sense, and we know clean-burning engines are needed globally as well as at home. This research also opens whole new avenues in diesel engine technology, and we’re darn thankful. Hyundai is not the only company working on gasoline fuel use in a diesel engine environment. We’ve also seen early examples of a similar setup from Audi and Aragon National Labs. In both cases, the goal is to reduce the emissions in a gasoline-burning engine. As technology marches on, we’ll see more of these hybrid engines and most likely other new technologies as well.
DIESEL HYBRID ENGINE: NEW HYUNDAI DIESEL RUNS ON GASOLINE
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby evilgenius » Wed 09 Aug 2017, 11:44:19

I can remember when common rail fuel injection was a huge boost to economy. I first heard about it in Smart Cars. It works by using a magnetic wafer to control injector flow, very precise.

I've been looking for someone to use compression to ignite gasoline engines at combustion. I've also been thinking that the length of a cylinder in such an engine ought to provide for the opportunity to inject either air or some air fuel mixture other than that of the primary mixture along the path of piston travel in order to provide for more complete burning of fuel.

Experimenting with different engine ideas is one of those things I'd like to do, but don't have the resources for. In the meanwhile, I think about design ideas. I don't like how the connecting rods in today's engines constrain the leverage of the power stroke. I don't see any reason why an engine needs to operate under the same leverage condition for compression as for power. It certainly does not take as much energy to compress an air/fuel mixture as you get back out of it when it ignites.
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby kublikhan » Wed 18 Oct 2017, 18:52:06

Looks like Mazda backed off on the pure HCCI engine and instead went for a hybrid combustion ignition/spark ignition. Most of the time it runs in compression ignition mode. While spark ignition takes over for those situations where HCCI has trouble with. They are calling the technology SPCCI, for Spark Plug Controlled Compression Ignition and it is set to debut in the 2019 Mazda 3. Estimated MPG improvement is 30%.

A gas engine that can act like a diesel—Skyactiv-X - Diesel engines squeeze the air and fuel in their cylinders until pressure makes the pair combust on its own; gas mills, meanwhile, fire spark plugs to create those torque-birthing explosions. This system, set to debut on the 2019 Mazda 3, blends the two, and gets up to 30 percent more MPG. It keeps the air-fuel ratio light on the petrol so it won’t self-ignite, but, in certain situations, it’ll squirt a skosh of extra fuel into the chamber and set it ablaze with the spark plug. That flame raises the pressure in the cylinder so the main supply of air and fuel more efficiently burns itself up.
A gas engine that can act like a diesel—Skyactiv-X

Mazda achieves compression ignition using a spark plug as a combustion control. This generated a new acronym: SPCCI, for Spark Plug Controlled Compression Ignition. It enables the Skyactiv-X to use extremely lean fuel mixtures like an HCCI engine—the sort that are so lean they can’t be combusted via spark, only by compression—but it does so over a much broader swath of driving scenarios, including under moderate load and higher engine speeds.

the X is plenty responsive and feels about as powerful as the current Mazda 3’s larger 2.5-liter four. We had assumed the X’s zeal might sag during CI operation, with deadened responses like those felt in hybrids that can briefly run solely on their relatively weak electric motors. That does not seem to be the case, and the engine is relatively tractable running under compression ignition. Even under compression ignition, the engine is smooth and quiet; the engine behaves so similarly in each ignition state that it takes concentration to detect which one is in play. Our limited exposure to fast, curvy roads during our drive hinted that the new 3 is just as satisfying to drive as the current model, with the benefit of a more composed ride and more refined wheel control on bumpy surfaces. In short, the 3 feels every bit like an evolution of today’s 10Best Cars–winning model. Only now, in addition to being fun to drive, the next 3 promises better fuel economy, more power, and an available working compression-ignition gasoline engine.
Driving Mazda's Next Mazda 3 with Its Skyactiv-X Compression-Ignition Gas Engine
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Re: New Engine Could Boost Fuel Economy by Half

Unread postby kanon » Fri 20 Oct 2017, 17:10:32

efarmer wrote:. . . . In my mind the real deal is a system of reducing the cost of driving and getting more human bods in each vehicle. It is the most bang for the buck and unit dose of petrol immediately and could really change the dynamic.

Public transportation does not reward the oligarch owners and so it was replaced by cars. Public transportation is deliberately mismanaged and short-changed on resources. The sheeple are generally OK with that since they like their toys and there are advantages. The idea of reducing the cost of driving is the non-starter here. Fuel efficiency and consumption must be balanced with fuel production and payments must slightly exceed income. Therefore, I predict these engines will be deployed after there is a lasting situation of fuel demand exceeding fuel production. Following that, electric cars will be employed as a last resort. OK, possibly too cynical, but I have to say that smaller and lighter cars could achieve similar results. How about smaller, lighter, and better engines?
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