Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby Timo » Thu 23 Apr 2015, 21:29:10

El Lago Llanquihue is actually a very beautiful place. I spent three weeks there back in 84, and looked across the lake every day to see three beautiful, majestic volcanos rising above the horizon. I wouldn't mind retiring there in just a few years, either. Real estate prices should be coming down about now, too. :roll:
Timo
 

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby Keith_McClary » Fri 24 Apr 2015, 01:24:49

"I could go on, but let’s veer off in another direction instead."

– The Archdruid
User avatar
Keith_McClary
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 7279
Joined: Wed 21 Jul 2004, 02:00:00
Location: Suburban tar sands

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Fri 24 Apr 2015, 09:45:30

Thanks, that's a marvelous shot.
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 16838
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby Keith_McClary » Fri 24 Apr 2015, 15:08:21

"I could go on, but let’s veer off in another direction instead."

– The Archdruid
User avatar
Keith_McClary
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 7279
Joined: Wed 21 Jul 2004, 02:00:00
Location: Suburban tar sands

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby vox_mundi » Fri 04 Dec 2015, 13:56:10

Mount Etna’s stunningly violent eruption was among the strongest in decades

Image

The lava fountain reached heights of close to a mile.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late.
User avatar
vox_mundi
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 3696
Joined: Wed 27 Sep 2006, 02:00:00

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 15 May 2016, 07:38:29

http://www.sltrib.com/news/1311474-158/ ... -magnitude

Swarm of earthquakes shakes Yellowstone

The big one???...

A total of 130 earthquakes of magnitude 0.6 to 3.6 have occurred...

...The first, a magnitude 3.5, struck Sept. 13 about 17 miles northeast of West Yellowstone, Mont. Then, in the early hours Sept. 15, two quakes, a magnitude 3.2 and magnitude 3.4, were detected in quick succession at 5:10 and 5:11 a.m., about 15 miles southeast of West Yellowstone. The magnitude 3.6 that marked the peak of the swarm struck nearby about 4 1/2 hours later.

"They weren't big earthquakes," Smith said, "but they were felt."

About half a dozen earthquakes are felt in Yellowstone in an average year, he said.

"This is pretty unusual, to be honest," Smith said...
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 16838
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby Cid_Yama » Sun 15 May 2016, 11:05:42

Did you not note that this was from Sept 2013?
"For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst and provide for it." - Patrick Henry

The level of injustice and wrong you endure is directly determined by how much you quietly submit to. Even to the point of extinction.
User avatar
Cid_Yama
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 6952
Joined: Sun 27 May 2007, 02:00:00
Location: The Post Peak Oil Historian

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Sun 15 May 2016, 12:14:20

dohboi - The size of those quakes isn't nearly as important as the frequency IMHO. It's what they might represent: the magma chamber getting significant shallower. The worse case scenario isn't an earthquake but a major venting event. That could destroy the economy of the country and potentially lead to millions across the globe starving.
User avatar
ROCKMAN
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 10671
Joined: Tue 27 May 2008, 02:00:00
Location: TEXAS

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 15 May 2016, 13:17:38

Sorry, missed the date.

And yeah, I know it takes more than this to signal a big quake. Just wanted to keep this thread bumped and generate some discussion. Go back to your usual tasks, now! :-D
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 16838
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Mon 29 Aug 2016, 23:07:49

Katla, one of Iceland's largest volcanoes, was rocked by two abnormally strong earthquakes Monday morning, raising concerns that the volcano may soon erupt.

The southern-Iceland volcano has not erupted since 1918, and scientists believe that a violent release is long overdue. From AD 930 to 1918, there were twenty large-scale eruptions documented by Katla, generally every 13–95 years.

In the early hours on Monday the area was hit by magnitude 4.5 and 4.6 quakes, similar to movements it experienced in 2011.

Interestingly, the volcano is covered by a large icecap, which would likely delay the eruption for around 60 to 90 minutes, according to Roberts. The delay could give people time to evacuate and assist air traffic control in redirecting aircraft.

The ice cap itself presents hazards, though.

“The other hazard might be a jökulhlaup, or glacial outburst flood."


http://sputniknews.com/europe/20160830/ ... uakes.html
User avatar
dohboi
Harmless Drudge
Harmless Drudge
 
Posts: 16838
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

The Volcanic thread

Unread postby Cid_Yama » Sun 04 Dec 2016, 12:51:00

Volcanoes: Coming to New England? William Menke
Some 30 years ago, geophysicists detected a 400-kilometer-wide anomaly under parts of New England and eastern New York, where the mantle is unusually hot. It was assumed to be the remnant of a hot spot that moved on some 130 million years ago. Now, based on new seismic images and signs of helium making its way up to lake beds, Menke says the feature is an active upwelling—hot and shallow enough to create lava. Similar features may underlie other parts of the East Coast.
Friday, Dec. 16, 8 a.m.-12:20 p.m., Moscone South Posters. T51G-3012

At the AGU.
"For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst and provide for it." - Patrick Henry

The level of injustice and wrong you endure is directly determined by how much you quietly submit to. Even to the point of extinction.
User avatar
Cid_Yama
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 6952
Joined: Sun 27 May 2007, 02:00:00
Location: The Post Peak Oil Historian

Re: The Volcanic thread

Unread postby Plantagenet » Sun 04 Dec 2016, 16:22:57

Cid_Yama wrote:Volcanoes: Coming to New England? William Menke
Some 30 years ago, geophysicists detected a 400-kilometer-wide anomaly under parts of New England and eastern New York, where the mantle is unusually hot. It was assumed to be the remnant of a hot spot that moved on some 130 million years ago. Now, based on new seismic images and signs of helium making its way up to lake beds, Menke says the feature is an active upwelling—hot and shallow enough to create lava. Similar features may underlie other parts of the East Coast.
Friday, Dec. 16, 8 a.m.-12:20 p.m., Moscone South Posters. T51G-3012

At the AGU.


Active hot spots produce linear arrays of multiple volcanoes as crustal plates move over them due to plate tectonics. The actual hot spot itself is actually a pretty small feature---it just manifests itself as large volcanoes.

There is no line of volcanoes terminating in New England, i.e. the "thermal anomaly" under New England is mostly likely not a hot spot.

There are lots of ways to get an anomaly that don't involve hot spots. Since New England is in the middle of a place and isn't tectonically active, it probably just involves the crust being a bit thinner there so asthenosphere is a bit closer to the surface or perhaps the rocks at depth being quite thermally conductive, making it relatively hotter then most of the rest of the mid-plate region around it.

Cheers!

"Its a brave new world"
---President Obama, 4/25/16
"Il bel far niente"
---traditional Italian saying
User avatar
Plantagenet
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 20632
Joined: Mon 09 Apr 2007, 02:00:00
Location: Alaska (its much bigger than Texas).

Re: The Volcanic thread

Unread postby Tanada » Sun 04 Dec 2016, 22:15:38

Back in 2005 I visited the San Fransisco Peaks in Arizona, a bonafide National Park,
http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2001/fs017-01/

It seems every 450-600 years a new Volcano punches up through the bedrock of Arizona from the hot spot in the mantle underneath that location. This is also the phenomenon that formed the islands from Wake all the way down the Hawaii chain of extinct volcanoes right up to the Big Island. There is even a new deep sea vent east of the Bog Island that is current forming a submerge4d shield volcano that will eventually be above sea level as the newest island in the very long chain.

If the hot spot under New England does manage to punch a few holes and build a few volcanoes I don't expect it to be like some Hollywood movie. Much more likely it will be like Hawaii and Arizona where a few mountains form over long periods of quiet interrupted by short bursts of lava and ash eruptions that actually create new mountains.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14115
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: The Volcanic thread

Unread postby rockdoc123 » Mon 05 Dec 2016, 10:54:01

There is still some debate as to whether there is an actual hot spot beneath the San Francisco volcanic field or if there was some other circumstance. Most of the research done has been to look at the petrography of the basalts with hopes of figuring out its genesis ....lot's of research and lots of paper but nothing conclusive from what I can tell. What I find interesting is the timing of volcanism in Arizona and New Mexico is somewhat similar to timing of volcanic events in southern California (Pliocene) which are believed to have formed as a response to subduction of the Mendocino triple junction. Perhaps there is some relationship.

In any event likely the Arizona risk for volcanic eruption is relatively low in comparison to Yellowstone but probably not zero.

Brumbaugh, D.S. et al, 2014. Analysis of the 2009 earthquake swarm near Sunset Crater volcano, Arizona. Jour of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 285, pp 18-28.
Abstract
A swarm of microearthquakes occurred on October 31, 2009 within 5 km of the Sunset Crater, Arizona, volcano. A detailed study of the swarm was warranted because of its location near a young volcanic construct and its proximity to the population center of Flagstaff, Arizona. The question posed in this study was whether the swarm was the result of tectonic stress release during fault slip, or due to stresses driven by magmatic processes. This question was addressed by analyzing and comparing the physical and seismic characteristics of the swarm to the regional tectonic environment and to the characteristics of tectonic swarms in Arizona and magmatic/volcanic swarms elsewhere. This analysis included swarm duration, frequency of events, b-value, focal depths and epicentral pattern of the swarm. The comparison of the salient features of the 2009 Sunset Crater swarm to both magmatic and tectonic swarms indicates that the Sunset Crater swarm has features similar to magmatic swarms and is a potential magmatic swarm candidate.
User avatar
rockdoc123
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 5595
Joined: Mon 16 May 2005, 02:00:00

Re: The Volcanic thread

Unread postby sparky » Tue 06 Dec 2016, 16:50:36

.
For those interested in volcanoes , a good link
It keep a day to day watch on the world volcanoes

http://volcano.si.edu/reports_weekly.cfm

It should be noted than recent volcanic activity has been quite boring ,
no world class events has occurred for decades , just the usual barbecuing of some locals
the last one was mount Pinatubo scaled at 6
the most fun was Eyjafjallajökull at a meager 4 , but it disturbed the European air transports for days
it turned out some university idiots had set up a model of the dust cloud ,
.......as all untested models do , it turned out to be useless .
User avatar
sparky
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 3265
Joined: Mon 09 Apr 2007, 02:00:00
Location: Sydney , OZ

Re: The Volcanic thread

Unread postby pstarr » Tue 06 Dec 2016, 17:02:45

sparky wrote:.
For those interested in volcanoes , a good link
It keep a day to day watch on the world volcanoes

http://volcano.si.edu/reports_weekly.cfm

It should be noted than recent volcanic activity has been quite boring ,
no world class events has occurred for decades , just the usual barbecuing of some locals

Los Angeles is not far from the Salton Buttes which last erupted around 940 and 0 BC.
Image
Not impossible and a load of fun! Well, as far as the movie goes anyway :( :cry: :razz:
Haven't you heard? I'm a doomer!
pstarr
NeoMaster
NeoMaster
 
Posts: 26543
Joined: Mon 27 Sep 2004, 02:00:00
Location: Behind the Redwood Curtain

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby Subjectivist » Sat 25 Mar 2017, 16:40:30

An underwater volcano on a small, remote island in Alaska's Aleutian chain has erupted 36 times in the past four months.

Dubbed by some as "one of the most active volcanos" in the United States, the volcano that sits under Bogoslof island has prompted the Alaska Volcano Observatory to issue red alerts to aircrafts after it began spewing ash plume up to 20,000 feet into the sky.

The island has reportedly tripled in size as a result of the pyroclastic fall from the volcanic eruptions and flow deposits.

According to the University of California at Santa Barbara's Volcano Information Center, pyroclastic flows stand to be "one of the most dangerous of volcanic phenomenon." The destructive masses are basically "hurricanes of hot gases and volcanic particles."

But humans have nothing to worry about, for now.

The entire land mass is protected by the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge System, so there aren't any human inhabitants on this volcano or the other reported 160 active volcanoes in that section of the Pacific Oceans called the "Pacific Ring of Fire."

Photos taken last year show the volcano erupting through an offshore vent under water.

"You can see in these images that a new volcanic cone is being built," Michelle Coombs, a USGS geologist told the New York Times in 2016. "If it continues, it might build a cone that is above seawater."


https://www.aol.com/article/news/2017/0 ... /21943337/
II Chronicles 7:14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.
User avatar
Subjectivist
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 4154
Joined: Sat 28 Aug 2010, 06:38:26
Location: Northwest Ohio

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby ROCKMAN » Sat 25 Mar 2017, 17:27:57

Sub - If it keeps growing perhaps we'll have our own "fire giant":

Surtsey ("Surtr's island" in Icelandic, pronounced /ˈsʏr̥tsei/) is a volcanic island located in the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago off the southern coast of Iceland. Surtsey is the southernmost point of Iceland. It was formed in a volcanic eruption which began 426 ft below sea level, and reached the surface on 14 November 1963. The eruption lasted until 5 June 1967, when the island reached its maximum size of 1 sq mi. Since then, wave erosion has caused the island to steadily diminish in size: as of 2012, its surface area was 1/2 sq mi). The most recent survey (2007) shows the island's maximum elevation of 509 ft above sea level.

The new island was named after Surtr, a fire jötunn or giant from Norse mythology. It was intensively studied by volcanologists during its eruption, and afterwards by botanists and other biologists as life forms gradually colonised the originally barren island. The undersea vents that produced Surtsey are part of the Vestmannaeyjar submarine volcanic system, part of the fissure of the sea floor called the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Vestmannaeyjar also produced the famous eruption of Eldfell on the island of Heimaey in 1973. The eruption that created Surtsey also created a few other small islands along this volcanic chain, such as Jólnir and unnamed other peaks. Most of these eroded away fairly quickly.
User avatar
ROCKMAN
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 10671
Joined: Tue 27 May 2008, 02:00:00
Location: TEXAS

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby rockdoc123 » Sat 25 Mar 2017, 17:43:41

here is another article on the Bogoslof Island eruption. In the article they also show a postcard photo from back in 1900 showing an underwater eruption.
http://www.ktva.com/pilots-report-eruption-bogoslof-island-volcano-avo-issues-warning-769/
User avatar
rockdoc123
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 5595
Joined: Mon 16 May 2005, 02:00:00

Re: THE Volcano Thread Pt. 2

Unread postby sparky » Mon 27 Mar 2017, 02:07:20

.

Volcano index photo Bogoslof | Fox Islands (USA) | 53.93°N, 168.03°W | Elevation 150 m

AVO reported that no significant volcanic activity at Bogoslof was detected in seismic or infrasound data during 15-21 March, and satellite views were either obscured by clouds or showed nothing noteworthy. Slightly elevated surface temperatures were identified in satellite images during 16-17 and 20-21 March. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Warning.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)


there is four new activity reports , making the monitored total of present volcanic activity at 19
all are in well known activity zone

4 in the south Asia rim ,
4 in Russian East ,
6 in South America
and one each in Sicily ( Etna ) ,Hawaiian Islands and the Aleutian Islands

From the Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
User avatar
sparky
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 3265
Joined: Mon 09 Apr 2007, 02:00:00
Location: Sydney , OZ

PreviousNext

Return to Environment, Weather & Climate

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests