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The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby Tanada » Sun 28 Feb 2016, 10:17:56

vtsnowedin wrote: I see some difficulties in your standard.
If you lost all income that would mean the sources of those incomes had collapsed not only for you but for your neighbors as well. You wouldn't be able to sell material assets as nobody would have any money. That is a true TSHTF scenario and is both unlikely and very hard to determine the exact outcomes from. A more likely problem is you or your spouse getting ill and the other having to quit their job to stay home and care for the other. The rest of the economy goes on around you and you can apply for benefits like food stamps etc. that you qualify for and draw any retirements you have in place. You could then calculate what you could reverse mortgage or sell off and a survival time.


I think that would all depend on where your outside income is sourced and how your neighbors outside income is sourced. Just for example, say it is 1970 and all your outside income, or at least the vast majority, comes from oil stocks diversified over several OPEC countries. Somewhere around 1973 the national governments of those OPEC countries 'nationalize' all those different countries you get income from and they give you zip, zero, nada in return. You personally would be financially devastated, but your neighbors would be just fine.

Or what if you are an Md in a specialty like plastic surgery and the Government adopts a single payer medical system where regulations remove your lucrative income and replace it with a fixed hourly salary as a general practitioner only allowed to treat patients who live within 10 kilometers of your home office. Sure you still have an outside income, but it is a pittance compared to what you were earning the year before.
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Sun 28 Feb 2016, 10:54:39

I was thinking more along the lines of my own situation where I am working while drawing a pension from another job , I am soon to be drawing social security and have a wife that is working two town government jobs one elected and one appointed .
My current job is public infrastructure related and may well end at the end of the project if no other project gets funding. The State pension check could only stop if the State of New Hampshire goes bankrupt. The Social security checks can only stop if their is a revolution. The wife could get voted out of office but her last election cycle was 285 to 0 so I think she can have it as long as she wants it or until the Town goes Bankrupt.
If the town went toes up property values and property taxes would fall like a stone. If social security , welfare and food stamp checks ended the economy would be so screwed up that heating oil would be unavailable and I could do pretty well selling fire wood off my land.
But if all that goes south at the same time or in a domino chain reaction we all will have more to worry about then the price of potatoes.
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Tue 15 Mar 2016, 14:42:34

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 085942.htm

We tend to talk about the extinction of most complex life, but even microbes are under threat, and that also has consequences for other life forms and life support systems:

Microbes in soil -- organisms that exert enormous influence over our planet's carbon cycle -- may not be as adaptable to climate change as most scientists have presumed
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 23 Mar 2016, 20:22:48

...the convergence of food, water and energy crises could create a 'perfect storm' within about fifteen years.


But these 'business as usual' forecasts could be very conservative.


From an oldie but goodie: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ ... scientists
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby americandream » Wed 23 Mar 2016, 20:31:09

dohboi wrote:
...the convergence of food, water and energy crises could create a 'perfect storm' within about fifteen years.


But these 'business as usual' forecasts could be very conservative.


From an oldie but goodie: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ ... scientists


Water and energy I would rate as the two majorish unknowns in a system largely hobbled by "peripheral" and avoid-able conflict and incompetence. On all of that, climate is the biggest elephant in this room.
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby onlooker » Mon 28 Mar 2016, 08:07:41

We are really in the process of committing Omnicide and Ecocide. Astonishing. http://www.reportfella.com/2016/03/37-m ... after.html
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby vox_mundi » Wed 06 Apr 2016, 13:21:32

Add one more to the list ...

Proof that ancient supernovae showered Earth with radioactive debris

An international team of scientists has found evidence of a series of massive supernova explosions near our solar system, which showered the Earth with radioactive debris.

The scientists found radioactive iron-60 in sediment and crust samples taken from the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

The iron-60 was concentrated in a period between 3.2 and 1.7 million years ago, which is relatively recent in astronomical terms, said research leader Dr Anton Wallner from The Australian National University (ANU).

"It's an interesting coincidence that they correspond with when the Earth cooled and moved from the Pliocene into the Pleistocene period."

Some theories suggest cosmic rays from the supernovae could have increased cloud cover.

One paper, authored by Anton Wallner and colleagues, proves the existence of ancient seabed deposits of iron-60 isotopes, tracing their source to supernovae occurring about 325 light years from Earth. The second paper, by a team headed by Deiter Breitschwerdt, estimates explosion times of these supernovae, isolating two events: one 1.7 to 3.2 million years ago, and the other 6.5 to 8.7 million years ago.

They would have been visible during the day and comparable to the brightness of the Moon.

Melott said both supernovae events were beyond the "kill zone" of roughly 30 light years, but they might have had other impacts—including influence on human evolution.

A possible source of the supernovae is an ageing star cluster, which has since moved away from Earth, independent work led by TU Berlin has proposed in a parallel publication. The cluster has no large stars left, suggesting they have already exploded as supernovae, throwing out waves of debris.

The locations of recent supernovae near the Sun from modelling 60Fe transport
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 06 Apr 2016, 13:50:35

"they might have had other impacts—including influence on human evolution"

So we really are mutants!
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby vox_mundi » Wed 06 Apr 2016, 18:02:51

What's a little fallout, eh? Have a nice day!

Image
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby onlooker » Sat 16 Apr 2016, 10:00:39

http://churchandstate.org.uk/2015/06/hu ... scientist/
Humans will be extinct in 100 years says eminent scientist
“"If you think the economy is more important than the environment, try holding your breath while counting your money"”
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Sat 16 Apr 2016, 13:17:27

He predicted that about 6 years ago when he was 96 a few weeks before he died.

Not saying it disqualifies the judgment, but Lovelock has backed of some of his doomiest predictions lately, and who knows if this guy would have too if he had continued to live (though he'd be 102 by now!).
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby vox_mundi » Sat 16 Apr 2016, 14:01:58

Pollutants in fish inhibit human's natural defense system

In a new study, environmental pollutants found in fish were shown to obstruct the human body's natural defense system to expel harmful toxins. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego-led research team suggests that this information should be used to better assess the human health risks from eating contaminated seafood. The study was published in the April 15 issue of the journal Science Advances.

A protein found in cells of nearly all plants and animals, called P-gp, acts as the cell's bouncer by expelling foreign chemicals from the body.

To determine how effective P-gp is at ridding cells of industrial and agricultural pollutants found in seafood, collectively known as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The scientists focused on POPs most commonly found in human blood and urine, and also detected in the muscle tissues of wild-caught yellowfin tuna. The pollutants included older "legacy" compounds such as the pesticide DDT as well as newer industrial chemicals, such as flame retardants.

Working with researchers at UC San Diego's Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science and School of Medicine, the researchers discovered that all 10 pollutants interfered with the ability of P-gp to protect cells.

The study was also the first to show how one of the 10 pollutants, PBDE-100, commonly used as a flame retardant in upholstery foam and plastics, binds to the transporter protein. The POP binds to the protein in a similar way as chemotherapeutics and other drugs, but instead of being transported out of the cell, the bound POP ultimately inhibits the protein's ability to perform its defense function.

"When we eat contaminated fish, we could be reducing the effectiveness of this critical defense system in our bodies," said Amro Hamdoun, an associate professor in the Marine Biology Research Division at Scripps, and lead author of the study.

"Its unsettling to find that all of the tested persistent environmental pollutants interfered with the P-gp protein's ability to protect cells," said Jacob James, managing director of the Waitt Foundation, who funded the study. "Even more troubling are the results showing that PBDE-100 binds to the P-gp protein, in essence latching onto and poisoning the 'bouncer' whose job it is to throw out the toxins. We can assume that some 'hot' fish carry more than one toxin and that seems like a credible triple threat, as the results with mixtures suggest that multiple toxins do act as 'force multipliers' in degrading cells ability to respond. We are the only species that can influence entire food chains and habitats, we must act more responsibly in the design and use of chemicals in our environment as well as work on economically feasible ways to measure and understand the impacts of those chemicals in seafood, and ourselves."
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Fri 29 Apr 2016, 16:19:26

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/a ... ource=SFFB


Human Extinction Isn't That Unlikely

“A typical person is more than five times as likely to die in an extinction event as in a car crash,” says a new report.
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Re: Learning how to die in the Anthropocene

Unread postby Tanada » Thu 19 May 2016, 22:54:00

Just found an interview with Roy Scranton, the author of Learning To Die In The Anthropocene. 30 minutes well worth your time.




http://www.cchange.net/2016/01/26/scranton/
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Re: Learning how to die in the Anthropocene

Unread postby dohboi » Fri 20 May 2016, 13:48:58

Thanks again, T.

Somewhat related:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/18/opini ... .html?_r=1

Our Crime Against the Planet, and Ourselves

There are three components to the claim that environmental degradation is a crime against humanity. First, it is an appeal to a universal, common humanity that stretches across space and time, and that is oblivious to geographic and historical differences. Second, the crime in question is an existential one that is committed against the very experience of being human, the human élan. Third, it is a crime that calls the established legal order into question, because everyone, and yet no one specifically, can be held responsible.

What is the nature of this crime? The human species is the agent of a terrible injustice being perpetrated against other species, future generations, ecosystems and our fellow human beings. Examples include contaminated waterways, mass species extinction, massive fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions and unsustainable rates of deforestation, to name just a few. This is leading to extreme and more frequent weather events, expanding deserts, loss of biodiversity, collapsing ecosystems, water depletion and contamination, and the rise of global sea levels.

However, humans are not all equally guilty of this crime. Some, such as those advancing the interests of the fossil-fuel industry, or those whose high-income lifestyles carry a heavy environmental footprint, are implicated more than those living in poverty. Present and past generations are collectively more at fault than future generations.
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Re: Learning how to die in the Anthropocene

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 22 May 2016, 13:26:53

And here's E. O. Wilson's alternative term for our epoch: The Age of Loneliness (or Eremocene--eremos in Greek means hermite, as in English 'eremite')

As we mow down more and more other species, we will be more and more alone as one of the few complex animals left.
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Re: Learning how to die in the Anthropocene

Unread postby ennui2 » Sun 22 May 2016, 14:02:41

Regarding "loneliness", this may be coming out of left-field, but has anyone paid much attention to television commercials of late?

More and more I'm seeing animal-based commercials. These commercials usually involve inserting wild or exotic animals into our a setting where they no longer exist.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45Vok2fM7Lg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2o3shroj7U

I think there's this yearning to be close to wild animals despite our urbanism.
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Re: Learning how to die in the Anthropocene

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 22 May 2016, 14:44:43

Edward Abbey's term for that was 'eco-porn.'
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 03 Jul 2016, 07:11:30

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... are_btn_fb

Could human imagination save us from extinction?

--Andrew Simms

We have been driving many species to extinction, seemingly without a care about who and what we push over the edge, including ourselves. But our ability to empathise may be key to our survival

If you wandered around planet Earth 100,000 years ago you would have come across at least half a dozen distinct species, or sub-species, of human. At least one, Homo erectus, centred around East Asia, lasted for nearly two million years. That makes the duration of us, recognisably modern Homo sapiens, at around 200,000 years, seem modest.

It will remain so if Yuval Noah Harari, author of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind is correct. He suggests on current trends we’ll be lucky to see out the millennium.

Some of those other human species we seem to have absorbed, such as the Neanderthals whose DNA we carry, while others we probably drove to extinction, directly or inadvertently. Scratching for positives you could argue that at least we don’t discriminate over who or what we push over the edge, including ourselves.

Is this, counter-intuitively what we will be remembered for – if there is anything or anyone else to remember us? Not our art, technology or great cities, but our epochal knack for driving others, and possibly ourselves in the process, to extinction?

That we are living through the planet’s sixth great (or not so great) mass extinction event was reinforced again last month. A new paper by scientists from the US and Mexico confirmed that vertebrate species, conservatively, are being lost at a rate up to 100 times faster than the natural background rate...
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Re: The Extinction Of Humanity pt. 2

Unread postby onlooker » Sat 01 Oct 2016, 19:39:28

This to me is a sign that humans have fundamentally altered our biosphere for the worse. A marker quite probably of our demise as a species. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/rel ... imates/en/

A new WHO air quality model confirms that 92% of the world’s population lives in places where air quality levels exceed WHO limits*. Information is presented via interactive maps, highlighting areas within countries that exceed WHO limits.
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