Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

THE Bees Thread (merged)

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby careinke » Thu 27 Feb 2014, 11:04:47

This year I plan to test my Peron hive. Hopefully the much larger colony size will make for a more successful overwinter than this year.

Image
Cliff (Start a rEVOLution, grow a garden)
User avatar
careinke
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 3402
Joined: Mon 01 Jan 2007, 03:00:00
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Sat 10 May 2014, 16:53:41

Link between insecticides and collapse of honey bee colonies strengthened

Two widely used neonicotinoids -- a class of insecticide -- appear to significantly harm honey bee colonies over the winter, particularly during colder winters, according to researchers. The study replicated a 2012 finding from the same research group that found a link between imidacloprid and Colony Collapse Disorder, in which bees abandon their hives over the winter and eventually die. The new study found low doses of a second neonicotinoid, clothianidin, had the same negative effect.


sciencedaily
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Master
Master
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby careinke » Sat 10 May 2014, 18:22:40

You could sign the petition to Home Depot, Lowe's and other retailers asking them to stop stocking neonicotinoids:

http://action.sumofus.org/a/home-depot-lowes-bees-neonicotinoids/8/6/?sub=fb

This one is important, (unless you don't like to eat). Walking down the garden chemical isle seems to disturb me more and more. Sometimes I just want to shout out: "ARE YOU PEOPLE JUST STUPID, WHY WOULD YOU USE THIS STUFF!!!"

If nothing else, it will help raise awareness.
Cliff (Start a rEVOLution, grow a garden)
User avatar
careinke
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 3402
Joined: Mon 01 Jan 2007, 03:00:00
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby jedrider » Wed 25 Jun 2014, 23:19:58

Then, there are the earthworm articles. All very interesting:

Neonicotinoids threaten "heart of a functioning ecosystem," says report co-author.

http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2014/06/24-5

Are Bee-Friendly Plants 'Poisoning Pollinators'?

http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2014/06/25-1

[Edit: Poisoning our way to extinction.]
User avatar
jedrider
Intermediate Crude
Intermediate Crude
 
Posts: 754
Joined: Thu 28 May 2009, 09:10:44

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Thu 26 Jun 2014, 07:16:55

Our state just banned the sale of anything called 'bee friendly' plants if they have been treated with Neonicotinoids. Ultimately, they should all be banned completely, but at least it's a start.

I have seen very few bees and fewer butterflies this summer so far, and I have yet to hear a cricket chirp.
User avatar
dohboi
Master
Master
 
Posts: 15524
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Subjectivist » Tue 15 Jul 2014, 21:27:52

I don't know if this video came up before, it was filmed last summer at a TED conference.
http://www.ted.com/talks/marla_spivak_w ... .com_a0J2P
II Chronicles 7:14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.
User avatar
Subjectivist
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 3762
Joined: Sat 28 Aug 2010, 06:38:26
Location: Northwest Ohio

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Keith_McClary » Tue 15 Jul 2014, 23:10:19

How plants may be evolving to the lack of bees
Plants which used to have two types of male reproductive organs – to increase their chances for fertilisation – are reverting back to one type. And in some cases, they are becoming self-fertilising.
This "reverse evolution" could provide new hope for people worried about declining numbers of pollinators, such as bees.
Researchers from the University of Stirling and the University of Illinois turned their attention on the buffalo bur, a prickly species from Mexico and North America. It's part of the same family of "nightshade" plants as the tomato and the humble potato.
The bur has evolved unusual flowers with two types of male reproductive organs – or anthers.
"One type of feeding anther has evolved to lure pollen-eating bees, whilst another pollinating anther sneaks behind the bees' backs and deposits pollen for fertilising other flowers", says Dr Mario Vallejo-Marín from Stirling's School of Natural Sciences.
...
this "reversion" to smaller flowers – with one functional type of anthers – may be caused by the loss of pollinators (such as bees) of the right size required to fertilise the flowers.
...
The buffalo bur is regarded as a weed – and an invasive species in some countries. But falls in bee numbers are a bigger worry for other crops.
"Whether the reversion towards self-fertilisation can provide an escape route from ecological bee shortages depends on how rapidly plants can evolve. In the current pollinator crisis, understanding how plants adapt to changes in bee numbers and type is essential."
That's fine for wild plants ("weeds") but most crop plants can't evolve naturally.
Image
Solanum rostratum aka buffalo bur, spiny nightshade, Colorado bur, Kansas thistle, Mexican thistle, and Texas thistle.
"I could go on, but let’s veer off in another direction instead."

– The Archdruid
User avatar
Keith_McClary
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 7273
Joined: Wed 21 Jul 2004, 02:00:00
Location: Suburban tar sands

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby dinopello » Wed 16 Jul 2014, 10:06:23

The birds and bees have been plentiful this year so far, I've even seen a return of the firefly. I tried various "natural" approaches this year like doing a Ladybug release and Beneficial nemotodes - does that stuff work ? I planted a bunch of flowering plants and fruits (blueberry, blackberry, figs) but the bees seem to prefer the big flowers on the pumpkins which are already massive and taking over the lawn. I just threw those seeds in the compost heap - now I'm going to have a pumpkin patch party in October. There's a community garden about 1/4 mile away that has a beehive so I guess that keeps me in good with the bees.
User avatar
dinopello
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 6096
Joined: Fri 13 May 2005, 02:00:00
Location: The Urban Village

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 16 Jul 2014, 10:28:19

Just be sure if you do get plants that they haven't been treated with neonicotinoids.
I'm glad you're seeing bees in your area. Not too many around here, compared to ten years ago. I haven't seen a firefly around here for a couple years, though I've seen them in the nearby countryside. How are butterfly in your area (where are you, anyway?)? I've seen a few monarchs, but again nothing like in previous years.
User avatar
dohboi
Master
Master
 
Posts: 15524
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby dinopello » Wed 16 Jul 2014, 10:58:36

I haven't seen butterflies much but the same stuff that attracts the bees should lure them in eventually I think. I have various types of flowering Clematis and giant Zinnias and some Gladiolus. I have set out a hummingbird feeder but so far haven't seen any. The birds are just fun to watch - when they aren't trying to chase me away from the blueberry plants.
User avatar
dinopello
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 6096
Joined: Fri 13 May 2005, 02:00:00
Location: The Urban Village

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Lore » Wed 16 Jul 2014, 11:05:35

I have fewer humming birds, no honey bees and haven't seen a monarch butterfly yet this year at my place here in the woods of Michigan.
The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life.
... Theodore Roosevelt
User avatar
Lore
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 9026
Joined: Fri 26 Aug 2005, 02:00:00
Location: Fear Of A Blank Planet

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby dinopello » Wed 16 Jul 2014, 11:22:17

Oh, and I'm in Arlington, VA (very urban environment). I think the proliferation of bees is directly due to the beehive close by in the community garden.
User avatar
dinopello
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 6096
Joined: Fri 13 May 2005, 02:00:00
Location: The Urban Village

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Shaved Monkey » Thu 17 Jul 2014, 02:25:58

We dont get lots of European bees but obviously enough to feed the bee eaters that hang out in the nearby trees
Image
Luckily they eat lots of other flying insects too.
Ready to turn Zombies into WWOOFers
User avatar
Shaved Monkey
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 1988
Joined: Wed 30 Mar 2011, 00:43:28

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Newfie » Mon 21 Jul 2014, 21:12:26

Newfoundland's healthy honeybees are an increasing draw for researchers in the race to understand why colonies across much of the globe are struggling or dying off.

"There is definitely interest in what's happening here," said Dave Jennings, a director with the provincial Natural Resources department.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundl ... -1.2712922
User avatar
Newfie
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 8109
Joined: Thu 15 Nov 2007, 03:00:00
Location: US East Coast

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby JV153 » Sat 20 Sep 2014, 05:34:59

Oakley wrote:
wisconsin_cur wrote:There were a lot of wild swarms this year. I guess I cannot make a solid argument for it but I would contend that it is not the honeybee that is in "terminal decline" but rather industiral, migratory beekeeping which is in decline. Of course their are crop systems which exist in a symbiotic relationship with contemporary beekeeping. Some of them will need to change or seek out other pollinators.

What else needs to be said!


There are certain species of plants which are clearly more suited to bees, e.g, that are major nectar sources.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_A ... honey_bees
JV153
 

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby dohboi » Sat 20 Sep 2014, 10:54:33

Unfortunately, there has been relatively little study of native bee species, so in most cases, as far as I've heard, we don't have a good base line to judge the current health of many of the dozens of native species.
User avatar
dohboi
Master
Master
 
Posts: 15524
Joined: Mon 05 Dec 2005, 03:00:00

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Lore » Thu 15 Jan 2015, 09:40:30

More Than 100 Businesses Call On White House To Protect Bees From Pesticides

More than 100 businesses, many of them food companies that depend heavily on pollinators for their products, sent a letter to the White House and multiple agencies Tuesday, urging the Environmental Protection Agency to protect pollinators by halting the use of certain pesticides.

Representatives from 118 businesses — including the owners of Clif Bar and Nature’s Path and the CEOs of Stonyfield and organic food company Amy’s — signed the letter, which calls on the EPA to immediately suspend its registration of neonicotinoids, a class of pesticides which have been linked to bee declines by at least 30 studies. Neonics are used on a variety of U.S. crops, including corn, soybeans, oranges, and leafy greens. They been found to affect the nervous system of honeybees, with studies finding that exposure to neonics can cause honeybees to forget what food smells like and can create short- and long-term memory loss in bees.

“Our businesses are deeply concerned about the continued and unsustainable loss of bees and other essential pollinator populations and urge that significant action be taken now to address the threats they face from pesticides and other stressors threatening their survival,” the companies write in the letter. “Bee losses have a ripple effect across the entire economy, and in many cases, affect our bottom-line.”

Last year, a federal report found that fewer managed honeybees died during winter 2013 than during winter 2012, but scientists say bees are still in trouble: as one entomologist told the New York Times last May, the winter 2013 bee numbers show bee losses have gone “from horrible to bad.” Much of this decline has been blamed on Colony Collapse Disorder, a phenomenon in which adult bees in a colony disappear from their hives, and which beekeepers have been experiencing since 2006
.
As the companies in the letter state, bee losses are bad news for U.S. crops and for companies who depend on them. One-third of all agricultural output in the U.S. is dependent on some sort of pollination, and some key crops such as almonds and squash depend heavily on bees in particular. But the companies write that they’re also concerned about the importance of bees to the overall health of the environment.

“We are gravely concerned that it neonicotinoids continue to be allowed into our environment at current rates, this practice will have devastating impacts on our food supply, ecosystems and economic wellbeing,” the letter states.
The Obama administration has taken steps in recent years to protect the health of honeybees and other pollinators. June, the Obama administration issued an executive order that created a Pollinator Health Task Force. About a month later, the Fish and Wildlife Service announced that it would phase out neonics in wildlife refuges in certain parts of the country. And in February of last year, the USDA announced it was investing $3 million into a program that pays farmers in the Midwest to make their farms more bee-friendly by doing things like planting alfalfa as a cover crop.

The food companies praised these actions as good first steps, but said more needs to be done to protect pollinators in the U.S.
The businesses aren’t the first to call for a ban or suspension of neonics. Last October, 60 members of Congress sent a letter to EPA Head Gina McCarthy, urging her agency to restrict or suspend the use of neonics on “bee-attractive crops.” The letter also calls on the EPA to stop and consider neonicotinoids’ impacts on pollinator species before registering new neonic pesticides, and states that the agency should restrict the use of neonics in commercial pesticides.

The U.S. may not have taken steps to ban neonics, but other countries and cities have. The European Union placed a ban on neonics in 2013, and in September, Seattle banned the use of neonics within city limits. Eugene, Oregon also voted to ban neonics last year.

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/0 ... t-of-bees/
The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life.
... Theodore Roosevelt
User avatar
Lore
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 9026
Joined: Fri 26 Aug 2005, 02:00:00
Location: Fear Of A Blank Planet

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby M_B_S » Wed 18 Feb 2015, 02:32:22

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/articl ... ne.0114805

Do Pollinators Contribute to Nutritional Health?
Alicia M. Ellis, Samuel S. Myers, Taylor H. Ricketts
Published: January 9, 2015DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0114805

Image

*****************************

Do we proof Albert Einstein another time correct very soon?
Image

Reality 2015

http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2015/02/ ... al-valley/

Honey Bees In Short Supply In Central Valley
Consumers could see increased almond and fruit prices as a result of decreasing bee populations.
February 16, 2015 6:59 PM


M_B_S
User avatar
M_B_S
Fission
Fission
 
Posts: 2674
Joined: Sat 20 Aug 2005, 02:00:00

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Shaved Monkey » Sun 22 Feb 2015, 22:44:41

This invention should increase the bee population as you remove the fear and a lot of the labour and equipment for the average back-yarder
They just got over a mill in crowd funding to make it happen.
Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_pj4cz2VJM
http://www.goodfood.com.au/good-food/fo ... 3m6yo.html
Ready to turn Zombies into WWOOFers
User avatar
Shaved Monkey
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 1988
Joined: Wed 30 Mar 2011, 00:43:28

Re: THE Bees Thread (merged)

Unread postby Pops » Thu 14 May 2015, 07:18:04

A prolonged and mysterious die-off of the nation’s honeybees, a trend worrisome both to beekeepers and to farmers who depend on the insects to pollinate their crops, apparently worsened last year.

In an annual survey released on Wednesday by the Bee Informed Partnership, a consortium of universities and research laboratories, about 5,000 beekeepers reported losing 42.1 percent of their colonies in the 12-month period that ended in April. That is well above the 34.2 percent loss reported for the same period in 2013 and 2014, and it is the second-highest loss recorded since year-round surveys began in 2010.

Most striking, however, was that honeybee deaths spiked last summer, exceeding winter deaths for the first time. Commercial beekeepers, some of whom rent their hives to farmers during pollination seasons, were hit especially hard, the survey’s authors stated.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/14/us/ho ... .html?_r=0

It says the die-off had eased some recently but summertime losses that high are unusual
If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen we must live through all time or die by suicide.
-- Abraham Lincoln
User avatar
Pops
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 17642
Joined: Sat 03 Apr 2004, 03:00:00
Location: QuikSac for a 6-Pac

PreviousNext

Return to Environment

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests