Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Discussions of conventional and alternative energy production technologies.

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby GHung » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 09:43:02

As I've stated before, IMO, the Powerwall's high voltage greatly limits its versatility. It requires long strings of PV, and upgrading PV output essentially requires another full string of nearly identical panels, as I understand it. I'm free to mix and match my PV as long as I keep my strings below 150 volts Vmp. That's the advantage of keeping charge control separate from DC to AC inversion. Cost a bit more? Yep. Much more versatile and resilient? Absolutely. Only when Tesla markets a Powerwall in the 100 volt range will I even consider such. And I skipped the part where high voltage DC is a very squirrelly thing. A system like mine, with a good hybrid inverter, can be grid-interactive, buying and selling as I choose via fairly simple programming.

Edit: I see the Powerwall2 is available in lower voltages. Hopefully Baha will set me straight. What is the DIY cost of a 13.5 kWh unit these days?

Meanwhile I'm having fun salvaging used 18650 Li-Ion battery cells to upgrade my portable power unit which can supply anything from USB power up to 24 V and 150 watts of AC. Primarily meant to charge USB devices and charge/run 12 volt gizmos. It's a bit astounding how many lithium cells get discarded when they are perfectly fine. If the battery management system in these devices detects just one cell that is questionable, it'll render the entire battery pack inoperable (won't let it charge). Sucks to know those expensive 18 volt power tool battery packs you bought are perfectly fine if one knows how to revive them.

I disassemble the battery packs (mainly from laptops and power tools), test the cells for internal resistance and capacity, and match them into strings for higher voltage to arranged into power banks. My power bank can be charged with PV or AC power. Battery system management systems (for safety and balancing cells) can be had from Ebay ridiculously cheap these days since virtually every lithium-powered device has one. For $5 I got a little unit that can manage, balance, and display data on up to 7 strings of cells. I built my system so that individual cells can be replaced easily, and HD and Lowes provide a constant supply of high quality cells if one wants to dig through the recycle bin. Cells that don't test up to their specs get returned to the bin. Reduce/Reuse/Recycle can be such fun. Eventually I may build my own lithium powerwall.
Blessed are the Meek, for they shall inherit nothing but their Souls. - Anonymous Ghung Person
User avatar
GHung
Intermediate Crude
Intermediate Crude
 
Posts: 2222
Joined: Tue 08 Sep 2009, 15:06:11
Location: Moksha, Nearvana

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 14:39:40

George, the Powerwall 2 is essentially an AC backup for a house which runs on 100% AC grid power at 120/240VAC. Your DC systems are by contrast optimal for a DIYer who implemented a piecemeal system over a number of years. They are not especially compatible, even though in the very long term the Powerwall 2 would be cheaper and a whole lot less maintenance.

My off-the-shelf system (installed by the #1 US roofing contractor and solar installer PetersenDean) is by contrast very compatible with Powerwall 2, because I have two strings of nine 24VDC panels and a two-leg "Sunny Boy" inverter that produces 110/220VAC at about 13 amps, feeding my main power panel through a 20 amp 2-pole breaker. However in my case the regulatory environment in California is so very favorable for a grid-attached system that no case can be made for adding a Powerwall 2. I am already using the power grid as a 100% efficient battery with zero maintenance. The state-mandated "net metering" has PG&E buying my excess power at the same peak retail rate they sell it to me, because my power is produced at the same time that California sun maximizes the A/C burden. In fact I just retired my 1hp pool pump when I removed the pool, so my system will produce a lot more excess power this year than last. This means that in 2018 my electrical surplus will more than ever before be reducing my natural gas charges in the same power bill.

Things will be different at my Nantucket residence. The weather in New England is not very much like California, in fact they call the area "New England" for a reason. Electricity is relatively costly, even after the diesel power plants I remember were replaced by a mainland power feed. However, because it is 30 miles from Cape Cod and the land is flat, the island has a place on NOAA's "Top Ten Wind Power Sites". I am still reflecting upon the alternatives, but a Powerwall 2 might be economically justified, depending upon whether or not "Net Metering" is mandated.

The main consideration is the regulatory environment, versus technical design alternatives. In your case, consider using panels with AC microinverters for your future power expansions. This will allow maximum flexibility going forward.
KaiserJeep 2.0, Neural Subnode 0010 0000 0001 0110 - 1001 0011 0011, Tertiary Adjunct to Unimatrix 0000 0000 0001

Resistance is Futile, YOU will be Assimilated.

Warning: Messages timestamped before April 1, 2016, 06:00 PST were posted by the unmodified human KaiserJeep 1.0
KaiserJeep
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 4984
Joined: Tue 06 Aug 2013, 16:16:32
Location: California's Silly Valley

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby baha » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 17:19:08

Hi Ghung,
The DC coupled PW 1.0 had a 48vdc battery bank with a DC to DC converter to make 400 volts for the AC inverter. There was indeed a 400vdc interface that had to be hooked up. That makes anybody nervous :) especially inspectors (electricians get real uptight about high-voltage DC). Even though it is dead when you hook it up.

But the AC coupled PW 2.0 does not have a DC interface. All the DC is contained within the sealed box. The only connection is 120/240 split phase AC. This simplifies the permit and inspection. Tesla does not advertise the internal DC specs. That is none of my or your business. It just works...no fire yet :) I will assume it is 48 volts.

Think of the Powerwall as a 240 volt AC battery. Add an AC PV inverter and I can sell my excess to the grid.

Unfortunately there is no DIY price for the Powerwall. Tesla says it must be installed by a trained and certified installer. If someone buys one on-line, it comes to our warehouse and is installed by me...can you say job security :)

I would enjoy making my own battery pack. I just don't have time. Just like everything else...you can have extra time or extra money, but not both :(

KJ - California is the reason PV panels are rated at 72f. Doesn't that get boring? You are in for a culture and climate shock moving to New England :)
A Solar fuel spill is otherwise known as a sunny day!
The energy density of a tank of FF's doesn't matter if it's empty.
I will see your google and raise you an infinity!

https://monitoringpublic.solaredge.com/solaredge-web/p/kiosk?guid=19844186-d749-40d6-b848-191e899b37db
User avatar
baha
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 987
Joined: Thu 12 Jul 2007, 02:00:00
Location: North Carolina, USA

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby GHung » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 18:11:45

baha wrote:Hi Ghung,
The DC coupled PW 1.0 had a 48vdc battery bank with a DC to DC converter to make 400 volts for the AC inverter. There was indeed a 400vdc interface that had to be hooked up. That makes anybody nervous :) especially inspectors (electricians get real uptight about high-voltage DC). Even though it is dead when you hook it up.

But the AC coupled PW 2.0 does not have a DC interface. All the DC is contained within the sealed box. The only connection is 120/240 split phase AC. This simplifies the permit and inspection. Tesla does not advertise the internal DC specs. That is none of my or your business. It just works...no fire yet :) I will assume it is 48 volts.

Think of the Powerwall as a 240 volt AC battery. Add an AC PV inverter and I can sell my excess to the grid.

Unfortunately there is no DIY price for the Powerwall. Tesla says it must be installed by a trained and certified installer. If someone buys one on-line, it comes to our warehouse and is installed by me...can you say job security :)

I would enjoy making my own battery pack. I just don't have time. Just like everything else...you can have extra time or extra money, but not both :(

KJ - California is the reason PV panels are rated at 72f. Doesn't that get boring? You are in for a culture and climate shock moving to New England :)


I knew a new Powerwall was not an option because the one thing I insist on is a "right to repair and install". I won't buy things I'm prohibited (by contract, agreement, or fine print) from installing and maintaining,,,, period. That's why I've never owned, and never will own, an Apple product. On the other hand, I found a guy here in NC that upgrades Tesla battery packs and sells low mileage Model S packs (24 volt) for a good price. For around $5K I can get four and have a 20 kWh+ battery set that should last a while.

Nothing against you guys and your great work. I just like to over-engineer everything which frustrates the crap out of "professionals". My former building inspector who is now my insurance guy saw how I do things 20 years ago. He stopped by the other day for his 3 year policy check and made fun of me. Said he worries about our place less than any of his customers. Says it'll take an EF-5 to bring this place down.

As for KJ and his "piecemeal" comment, I haven't had a single system failure in over 21 years, and only one planned power outage to swap out batteries. Nuf said about that.

BTW: I pulled one of my first PV panels from the greenhouse this morning for cleaning and testing. Hooked it to a spare MPPT contoller and a well-discharged deep cycle battery. Still producing 77 watts, and it's a 75 watt panel which has been in constant service since October 1994. It's a fairly cool day here and my solar irradiance meter was reading 1020 watts/m2. Right on spec after 23+ years.
Blessed are the Meek, for they shall inherit nothing but their Souls. - Anonymous Ghung Person
User avatar
GHung
Intermediate Crude
Intermediate Crude
 
Posts: 2222
Joined: Tue 08 Sep 2009, 15:06:11
Location: Moksha, Nearvana

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Mon 02 Apr 2018, 19:41:39

Nobody ever claimed that solar PV wears out in an electrical sense. What usually happens is that the protective films cloud and delaminate, the wire insulation deteriorates in sun and weather, and the aluminum frames corrode.

I implied no criticism of your system, by the way. If you intend to remain off grid forever, then the afore-mentioned "piecemeal" approach and seperate DC components are optimal as long as a knowledgeable person is present to tweek and repair such a system. But if you intend to convert at any future time to a grid-attached system, or even sell your house to a non-solar enthusiast, then integral microinverter panels are a good choice. For example I would choose those today to add capacity to my own DC to AC inverter grid-tied system, which is entirely managed and operated by PG&E at zero cost to me. But I don't ever forsee any Powerwalls here in California for grid-attached systems, unless they change the compensation scheme for grid-attached solar PV.
KaiserJeep 2.0, Neural Subnode 0010 0000 0001 0110 - 1001 0011 0011, Tertiary Adjunct to Unimatrix 0000 0000 0001

Resistance is Futile, YOU will be Assimilated.

Warning: Messages timestamped before April 1, 2016, 06:00 PST were posted by the unmodified human KaiserJeep 1.0
KaiserJeep
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 4984
Joined: Tue 06 Aug 2013, 16:16:32
Location: California's Silly Valley

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby baha » Wed 04 Apr 2018, 06:53:44

KaiserJeep wrote:Nobody ever claimed that solar PV wears out in an electrical sense. What usually happens is that the protective films cloud and delaminate, the wire insulation deteriorates in sun and weather, and the aluminum frames corrode.


Dude, you are living in the past. What usually happens is PV panels just work. I do solar service...inverters die, charge controllers quit, fans go out, PV panels just work. The only reason I have ever replaced a panel is squirrels eating the insulation right up to the connection box, or it was shattered by impact. The aluminum is anodized and will not corrode unless you scratch it...hard.

KaiserJeep wrote:But if you intend to convert at any future time to a grid-attached system, or even sell your house to a non-solar enthusiast, then integral microinverter panels are a good choice.


Just give me call, I did this the other day. A few changes to the wiring and Ghung's system would be cranking out 400 vdc. Installation of a PV inverter and a Powerwall and the new soccer mom would love it :) Fire...what fire? It's called POWER.

KJ - I am not now or ever been a fan of microinverters. Sensitive electronics has no business on a hot roof. The 20 year claims by Enphase have been hit or miss. If you get a good one it's fine, but we have had bad batches that all had to be replaced over time. And everytime I replace one I have to climb on the roof!

Enphase used to pay installers for replacing units $110. They stopped doing that because it was out of hand. We don't install them anymore...
A Solar fuel spill is otherwise known as a sunny day!
The energy density of a tank of FF's doesn't matter if it's empty.
I will see your google and raise you an infinity!

https://monitoringpublic.solaredge.com/solaredge-web/p/kiosk?guid=19844186-d749-40d6-b848-191e899b37db
User avatar
baha
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 987
Joined: Thu 12 Jul 2007, 02:00:00
Location: North Carolina, USA

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby GHung » Wed 04 Apr 2018, 08:11:13

Yeah, Baha, I've never been a big fan of micro-inverters. Fun to play with, but not for battery-based systems. Where is the sense in inverting DC to AC to be converted back to DC to be inverted to AC for household use. One could make the case for a purely grid-tied system or for very long wire runs, but where's the fun in that?

As I said, I'm also not a big fan of higher voltage DC. My arrays top out at around 90 volts, mainly because my inverters are still 24 volt (48 volts was rare when I originally built the system) , my battery bank is made up of 12 big 2 volt cells (would require 24 cells for 48 volt) and a couple of my arrays are 10 panels (would be around 115-120 volts in two strings of 5). My 5 arrays run from about 36 volts to about 90 Voc, which has been working fine on my MPPT controllers. If it ain't broke ..... and there weren't many panels available over 12 volt nominal for early adopters like me back in the day.

Also, systems over 48 volts were subject to a lot more scrutiny by inspectors in the late 90s. Under 48 volts, they were largely ignored on the DC side. Inspectors didn't really know what they were dealing with so they just asked; "Is it below 48 volts?"....
Blessed are the Meek, for they shall inherit nothing but their Souls. - Anonymous Ghung Person
User avatar
GHung
Intermediate Crude
Intermediate Crude
 
Posts: 2222
Joined: Tue 08 Sep 2009, 15:06:11
Location: Moksha, Nearvana

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Wed 04 Apr 2018, 12:04:34

Well, for my own on-grid situation, micro-inverter panels make sense because they can be added to the remainder of my roof space and will still produce usable power. I don't have unobstructed roof space to add even one more string of nine 24-volt panels to the two I have, because at least one panel in such a new series string would be shaded by chimney, trees, or nearby houses. The individual microinverter panels would go on and offline as the shade changed throughout the day - and there isn't any space for anything else, even a single tracking array on a pole would intrude in my tiny backyard.

It's an academic consideration anyways. Since I retired the swimming pool pump, I have lots of excess power production, which my neighbors without solar roofs are effectively consuming. The net metering benefits me and it's a wash for PG&E, who are reselling my power at the same retail rate. They do benefit in the sense that as the neighborhood ages and more people add A/C and hot tubs and EVs, they don't have to do an infrastructure upgrade. That would not be cheap in my 35-year-old neighborhood, because all the utilities are underground. Although I was the first to get solar PV, there are now 8 solar homes out of the 38 in our little homeowners association. Additionally, two houses have domestic hot water heating and I know at least one neighbor has a solar pool heater on the back fence of his backyard.

Frankly, with a strong net metering environment like we have in California, Musk won't be selling too many Powerwalls. I am speculating that is the reason he chose Australia as his first major Powerwall and solar roof market - it was a friendly regulatory environment that was still a fairly large sized market.
KaiserJeep 2.0, Neural Subnode 0010 0000 0001 0110 - 1001 0011 0011, Tertiary Adjunct to Unimatrix 0000 0000 0001

Resistance is Futile, YOU will be Assimilated.

Warning: Messages timestamped before April 1, 2016, 06:00 PST were posted by the unmodified human KaiserJeep 1.0
KaiserJeep
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 4984
Joined: Tue 06 Aug 2013, 16:16:32
Location: California's Silly Valley

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Thu 05 Apr 2018, 13:06:54

baha wrote:Enphase used to pay installers for replacing units $110. They stopped doing that because it was out of hand. We don't install them anymore...

This reminds me of the shops which used to build custom PC's locally (good old days, like the 90's). They would show me shelves full of bad motherboards which the Asian makers had refused to honor the warranty on.

It's hard to imagine a company just refusing to do the right thing on parts with a bad reputation, UNLESS its a part of a going-out-of-business (at least in that line of business) plan.
Given the track record of the perma-doomer blogs, I wouldn't bet a fast crash doomer's money on their predictions.
User avatar
Outcast_Searcher
COB
COB
 
Posts: 5275
Joined: Sat 27 Jun 2009, 20:26:42

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby KaiserJeep » Thu 05 Apr 2018, 15:46:39

Outcast_Searcher wrote:
baha wrote:Enphase used to pay installers for replacing units $110. They stopped doing that because it was out of hand. We don't install them anymore...

This reminds me of the shops which used to build custom PC's locally (good old days, like the 90's). They would show me shelves full of bad motherboards which the Asian makers had refused to honor the warranty on.

It's hard to imagine a company just refusing to do the right thing on parts with a bad reputation, UNLESS its a part of a going-out-of-business (at least in that line of business) plan.


You have never had experience with Chinese contract manufacturers, it would seem. When we had a quality issue with one particular manufacturer that they did not seem willing to address, we switched to an alternate and pre-qualified source. Then bad hardware without valid serial numbers showed up at a major customer site, made by the first (now disqualified) manufacturer. They were back-dooring the stuff to a major stock exchange customer. We refused to service machines that contained any parts we had not blessed via our test process, and things got very ugly for a while, the stock exchange held up add-on orders for one quarter and the District Sales Manager blamed Engineering's "unreasonable attitude" for the shortfall.

THAT is the reality of doing business in China. We would LOVE to have had US manufacturers respond to our RFP's, but the only venders that would sign contracts were Chinese. We knew we would have quality and scheduling issues and we did in fact have them. Meanwhile back in the USA the company that had absorbed mine had laid off our entire former manufacturing organization, there were no alternatives.

Then there was a huge language issue as well. TRY to find an interpreter that can adequately explain Engineering level technical details. Try to examine source control documentation written in Chinese. (For all I knew, they had provided an Egg Foo Yung recipe and called it an SCD.)

You can only beat your head against the brick wall for so long, then it begins to hurt, and when you have 38 years on the job and are qualified for early retirement, you take them up on it.
KaiserJeep 2.0, Neural Subnode 0010 0000 0001 0110 - 1001 0011 0011, Tertiary Adjunct to Unimatrix 0000 0000 0001

Resistance is Futile, YOU will be Assimilated.

Warning: Messages timestamped before April 1, 2016, 06:00 PST were posted by the unmodified human KaiserJeep 1.0
KaiserJeep
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 4984
Joined: Tue 06 Aug 2013, 16:16:32
Location: California's Silly Valley

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby baha » Fri 06 Apr 2018, 07:01:15

GHung wrote:Also, systems over 48 volts were subject to a lot more scrutiny by inspectors in the late 90s. Under 48 volts, they were largely ignored on the DC side.


That is why 48 vdc is a standard in the solar industry for battery based systems. The code reads 48 volts and below is not considered hazardous. Which is silly...I can hurt you with 24 volts :twisted:

Or I can show you how to work with 400 volts safely. All wire insulation these days is rated to 600 volts. Which is why amateurs like me can play around with 400 volt systems. The code requirements for high voltage DC include metal conduit (inside the house) and ground fault and arc fault detection.

Microinverters have been superseded by Optimizers. Each panel gets it's own MPPT (Max Power Point Tracker) so shading only kills the panels being shaded. And it meets the new 2017 code requirement for Rapid-Shutdown...

If a fireman shows up at your house and pulls the meter the grid tied inverter will shutdown instantly. The Optimizers will detect that and also shutdown. All the wiring in the whole system is now safe. The fireman doesn't have to worry about DC conductors that are still hot because the sun is shining.

KaiserJeep wrote:Frankly, with a strong net metering environment like we have in California, Musk won't be selling too many Powerwalls.


Many Powerwalls have been sold in CA. To some people it is about more than the money. Being independant and taking control of your environmental footprint is also important.
A Solar fuel spill is otherwise known as a sunny day!
The energy density of a tank of FF's doesn't matter if it's empty.
I will see your google and raise you an infinity!

https://monitoringpublic.solaredge.com/solaredge-web/p/kiosk?guid=19844186-d749-40d6-b848-191e899b37db
User avatar
baha
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 987
Joined: Thu 12 Jul 2007, 02:00:00
Location: North Carolina, USA

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby EdwinSm » Sat 02 Jun 2018, 05:56:31

2nd phase of my solar installation has been ordered. The first was a ground heat exchange (basically using stored solar heat in rocks during winter). Now a few pv panels (10) are going on the roof, in a standard grid-tide system.

To go for a battery backup for just solar in a latitude equal to south Alaska, it would need to hold 4-6 months worth of power. The adverts for solar power here warn of 0 kWh production in December and January! Wind would be a good addition if my smallish property was not at the base of a wooded ridge, so the flow of wind over the property is limited. At least we are sheltered from the cold northerly winds.

To go off grid year round in this area the following components seemed to be needed: wood heating (not enough land so would need to buy wood), solar and wind power and a back up generator.

Given current electricity prices (we have some of the lowest in Europe) the economics of adding solar panels is decidedly suspect (ie payback in 28 years!), but this is a sort of hedge against rising prices and the banks here have basically stopped giving interest on savings so the money saved for retirement might be used now to lower costs later.
EdwinSm
Lignite
Lignite
 
Posts: 384
Joined: Thu 07 Jun 2012, 03:23:59

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby baha » Mon 04 Jun 2018, 19:00:50

EdwinSm wrote: a latitude equal to south Alaska


ES, I am impressed! To pursue Solar Power where you live is real dedication. I think it can be done. You should tilt your panels as much as you can. Be sure to let us know how much offset you can achieve.
A Solar fuel spill is otherwise known as a sunny day!
The energy density of a tank of FF's doesn't matter if it's empty.
I will see your google and raise you an infinity!

https://monitoringpublic.solaredge.com/solaredge-web/p/kiosk?guid=19844186-d749-40d6-b848-191e899b37db
User avatar
baha
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 987
Joined: Thu 12 Jul 2007, 02:00:00
Location: North Carolina, USA

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby Newfie » Mon 04 Jun 2018, 20:39:08

We have a 400 watt wind generator. When we lived in a marina at about 42°N it was pretty useless. I considered dumping it. Now that we are living in the trade winds it is doing very well and produces 24x7.

Wind speed drops of sharply when you are on land.
User avatar
Newfie
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 10262
Joined: Thu 15 Nov 2007, 03:00:00
Location: US East Coast

Re: The Rise of the Personal Power Plant

Unread postby baha » Tue 12 Jun 2018, 10:06:50

It's been almost a year now. I have to admit the novelty has worn off a bit. Since I passed thru the winter I have been grid free. Everything is programmed and running and all I have to do is smile :)

Last year I didn't turn the AC on until July. I just dehumidified to keep it cheap. This year it's like what's the point. I programmed the heat pumps so the living room cools during the day and the bedroom cools at night. I make, store, and use power automatically without a minutes thought. I can't even begin to use all the power I am making. I really need that EV.

I have the Powerwall set at 25% reserved. With that setting, I can handle many cloudy days without using the grid (except in Dec and Jan). Since March, I quit worrying about it. I am grid free and it feels good :)

So far my best day of production was 46.8 kW-hrs. The worst was about 2. On the worst heating day my house used 51 kW-hrs. Just once, but that really hurts. I need that solar heating system. But the overall result is my electric bill has been $13.29 every month since I installed the system...and always will be. The rates have already gone up once.

I have made 8.12 MW-hrs so far. I have used 5.8 in my house during that time. The rest is exported for free...your welcome :) At 11 cents a kW-hr, that is $888.16 worth of power... In 10 months.

I keep making progress. I now have network access from my PC to my Powerwall without the Internet. It creates it's own wireless network and, if you know how to connect to it, you can get a webpage showing solar production, home usage, and battery state-of-charge. This means when the grid and Internet are down I can still sit in my easy chair and monitor my system on-screen.

Here you go...

Screen Shot 2018-06-12 at 9.49.23 AM.jpg
Screen Shot 2018-06-12 at 9.49.23 AM.jpg (41.26 KiB) Viewed 1525 times


Here are a few graphs of yearly totals. If the green bar is taller than the red, I am net exporting for that month. If the red bar is taller than the blue, I used the grid...Pretty much only in winter. Solar thermal heating will solve that problem. Remember I didn't get the Powerwall until September.

Screen Shot 2018-06-12 at 9.46.53 AM.png
Screen Shot 2018-06-12 at 9.46.53 AM.png (126.79 KiB) Viewed 1525 times

Screen Shot 2018-06-12 at 9.48.53 AM.png
Screen Shot 2018-06-12 at 9.48.53 AM.png (124.3 KiB) Viewed 1525 times


Conclusions? When I get a solar thermal heating system and an EV all this back and forth about FFs and Alt energy and supply and demand will be in the noise. I will have already paid for the next 20 years :) And it will be time to PARTY [smilie=occasion16.gif]
A Solar fuel spill is otherwise known as a sunny day!
The energy density of a tank of FF's doesn't matter if it's empty.
I will see your google and raise you an infinity!

https://monitoringpublic.solaredge.com/solaredge-web/p/kiosk?guid=19844186-d749-40d6-b848-191e899b37db
User avatar
baha
Tar Sands
Tar Sands
 
Posts: 987
Joined: Thu 12 Jul 2007, 02:00:00
Location: North Carolina, USA

Previous

Return to Energy Technology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests