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Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Tue 05 Dec 2017, 15:57:45

by 11 pm it was up to 10,000 acres.
http://ktla.com/2017/12/04/fast-moving- ... onditions/

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/201 ... ands-homes
Nearly 8,000 homes have been evacuated in southern California after ferocious winds whipped up an explosive wildfire that could soon threaten a city of more than 100,000.

The blaze broke out on Monday evening east of Santa Paula, which is about 60 miles north-west of Los Angeles. It grew to more than 100 sq km (40 sq miles) by the early hours of Tuesday, consuming vegetation that has not burned in decades...
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby Plantagenet » Tue 05 Dec 2017, 17:49:20

The fires have now reached the outskirts of the city of Ventura and houses and apartment buildings are burning.

The Thomas fire is considered to be 0 percent contained. They can't stop it.

ventura-county-fire-california

Isn't all this wildfire activity in California a little unusual in December? I lived for a while in the Bay Area and December was usually when I had to stop wearing shorts and flip flops and shift to tennis shoes, jeans and a rain jacket because the weather cooled down and sometimes it even sprinkled a bit.

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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Tue 05 Dec 2017, 20:30:41

Thanks for the map, P. At the rate this is going, it looks like it could just burn the whole town to the ground in the next day or two. I've only seen one report of a fatality so far, though, fortunately.
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby Plantagenet » Wed 06 Dec 2017, 16:34:49

They've got 2 dangerous within the LA city limits now. One is threatening the Getty museum.

Ohmigod. Don't let the Getty Museum complex burn. Please god. No, god. Not the museum.

And save beautiful Ventura. And save historic Santa Barbara. Protect Malibu and Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica as well. OK....also save LA, I guess.

We'll be good now. Honest we will. We'll take global warming seriously now. We'll throw out the phony Paris Climate Accords and replace it with a real treaty that cuts CO2 emissions. We'll stop eating meat. We'll all drive EVs. We'll cut way back on airplane travel. Honest we will.

We'll be good now. We promise.

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Global Warming causes extreme heat waves which cause large wildfires
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Thu 07 Dec 2017, 14:55:16

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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby Plantagenet » Thu 07 Dec 2017, 16:39:04



Great link Dohboi. I quote:

Today, the fire index for Southern California is 296. The threshold for an extreme fire index is 165. And 296 is the highest fire index So Cal has ever experienced according to local firefighters. Fire index is a measure of fire risk. So, if these reports are correct, this region has never seen fire danger hit such an extreme intensity.

The scribbler has identified a very important point here. This is unprecedented.

Thats the nature of global warming. Its pushing the climate into regimes that we haven't seen before, and we don't know exactly how the planet will respond.

Apparently one way it responds is by creating heatwaves and drought and high winds and wildfires in California. This year of fires may be showing us the new climate for the golden state----hot, dry, very windy and extremely prone to wildfires.

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How do you like your new climate, California?
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Thu 07 Dec 2017, 17:38:13

Yes, the figures and pictures (thanks for that one...wow) are just amazing.

"Unprecedented" is a word we are hearing more and more.

And yes, now this will be our new reality, and of course much much worse.

And we see that these kinds of fires in these places do not just burn the houses of the poor. Bel-Air is home to some of the wealthiest and most powerful people in the country. I wonder if it will cause some to be a bit more...concerned about consequences of GW.
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby onlooker » Thu 07 Dec 2017, 20:58:40

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-m ... story.html
Ventura County wildfire destroys more homes, reaches Pacific Ocean

"The Thomas fire has burned 65,500 acres, destroyed at least 150 structures and forced 27,000 people to evacuate.
Ruben Vives, Laura J. Nelson, Sarah Parvini, Matt Hamilton and Sonali Kohli Contact Reporters

The fire that has ravaged Ventura County continued to burn out of control Wednesday, reaching the Pacific Ocean unchecked as officials warned many more homes have been lost.

The fast-moving, wind-driven wildfire continued to rage through the city of Ventura on Tuesday evening, jumping Highway 33 and burning through oil fields before crossing the 101 Freeway into Solimar Beach, authorities said.

On Wednesday, fire officials said their focus was going to be prevent the fire from moving into the Ojai Valley.

The blaze has consumed 65,500 acres on its journey to the ocean. The 101 remains open, but authorities warned drivers to be cautious traveling through the area.

Thousands of homes were still threatened by flames, 27,000 people were forced to flee, a firefighter was injured and Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency, as some 1,100 personnel continued to battle the blaze.

At least 150 structures — including one large apartment complex and the Vista Del Mar Hospital, a psychiatric facility — were consumed by flames. But Cal Fire suspects the true number is hundreds more; firefighters just haven’t been able to get into areas to know for sure.

Authorities Tuesday evening continued to widen evacuation zones and announced dozens of school closures in Ventura and Conejo Valley for Wednesday.

The Casitas Municipal Water District warned residents to boil their tap water for about a minute before drinking and cooking. The order was issued to residents in the Upper Ojai Valley, Casitas Springs, Foster Park and the entire city of Ventura because of the loss of pressure and water supply from fire-related power outages.

The fall weather sequence helped spark the Thomas fire, which as of 7:45 p.m. Tuesday was 0% contained, fire officials said. In the last couple of years, the rains came before the Santa Ana winds. But this year, with no rain in three months, the winds hit dry fuels.

“This fire is very dangerous and spreading rapidly, but we'll continue to attack it with all we've got,” Brown said. “It's critical residents stay ready and evacuate immediately if told to do so.”

The state sent resources to help with firefighting efforts as authorities opened new shelters throughout the county. Ventura County officials have asked the state for eight fixed-wing firefighting aircraft to help douse the flames, said Ventura County Sheriff’s Sgt. Kevin Donoghue.

The blaze started about 6:25 p.m. Monday in the foothills near Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula, a popular hiking destination. It grew wildly to more than 15 square miles in the hours that followed — consuming vegetation that hasn't burned in decades, Ventura County Fire Sgt. Eric Buschow said.

Source: Ventura County Fire, Mapzen, OpenStreetMap (Raoul Ranoa/@latimesgraphics)
“The burn area is pretty much all the mountains between Ventura and Ojai and extending east to Santa Paula,” Donoghue said. “It’s a challenge because of the enormity of it, and it’s a challenge because it’s pretty rugged terrain.”

Power outages also caused problems for firefighters Monday night and rendered some pumping systems inoperable, said Ventura County Fire Capt. Steve Kaufmann. Some hydrants couldn’t get water pumped to them because there was no power, he said.

At one point in Ojai, the entire water system went down, including hydrants and drinking water, because a pumping system was damaged by the fire, Kaufmann said.

On Tuesday morning the water district had sent people to Ventura to repair the problems, but he did not know status of the repair.

“It definitely presented a challenge to us,” he said.

By 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, authorities had ordered a mandatory evacuation of the entire community of Casitas Springs, northwest of Ventura. The evacuation area spreads from the northern portion of Highway 33 into Ojai, said Ventura County Fire Department Capt. Stan Ziegler. The county also issued a voluntary evacuation order for all parts of Ojai Valley not under mandatory evacuation.

In addition to the Ventura County Fairgrounds in Ventura and Nordhoff High School in Ojai, evacuation centers have been set up at the Oxnard College gymnasium and Santa Paula Community Center.

The size of the fire will likely grow, Ziegler said. Authorities are still seeing “erratic fire behavior and erratic winds so it’s making the firefight very difficult," Ziegler said.

Aircraft are available for firefighting efforts, but will usually only drop retardant when winds are below 30 mph, said California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection spokesman Scott McLean.

About 7 a.m., the wind appeared to be pushing the fire east toward Camarillo and north toward Ojai, said Ventura County Sheriff’s Senior Deputy Tim Lochman.

On Tuesday, firefighters continued trying to save homes in Ventura, where the fire was active. They faced a red-flag wind advisory that notes ridgeline winds of 35 to 45 mph, with gusts up to 70 mph. Winds are expected to decrease somewhat in the afternoon, said Chad Cook, Ventura County Fire Department division chief.

The fire hopscotched through hillside neighborhoods Monday night, burning some homes and sparing others. Some residents hoped the worst might be over in the early hours of the morning when the wind died down. But it picked up with a fury around daybreak, causing more destruction.

Engulfed in flames, the Hawaiian Village Apartments above central Ventura collapsed about 4 a.m.

Water gushed down North Laurel Street as firefighters worked to put out the flaming complex and residents watched, holding cameras and cellphones. The sound of bursting propane tanks filled the air.

Hundreds of firefighters working through the night tried to prevent the blaze from spreading, block by block, as they were confronted by wind gusts of up to 50 mph.

One firefighter was hit by a car while he was protecting homes. He was at a hospital, said Ventura County Fire Capt. Scott Quirarte.

Fire officials said the intensity of the fire, coupled with the high winds, made it pretty much unstoppable.

Schools in the Oxnard, Ventura, Hueneme and Santa Paula school districts were closed Tuesday.

California authorities have secured a grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to assist in firefighting efforts, the Office of Emergency Services announced Tuesday morning.

Fire officials expected flames would rip through at least 50,000 acres in the mountains between Santa Paula and Ventura.

The destruction comes in what was already the worst year on record for wildfires in California. Forty-four people were killed and more than 10,000 structures were lost when fires swept through Northern California’s wine country in October.

The Thomas fire’s movement bears some similarity to Northern California’s Tubbs fire, which ravaged the town of Santa Rosa and killed more than 20 people in October, McLean said.

The Thomas fire has moved almost as quickly as the Tubbs did, with winds pushing flames that started north of a community into a city, he said. Like the Tubbs, there are access issues with the Thomas fire because of the topography, McLean said.

What’s different, though, is that authorities began the morning of the Tubbs firefighting more than a dozen blazes in the area, whereas the Thomas fire is currently the greatest threat in Southern California. The Creek fire, near Sylmar, was at 11,000 acres early Tuesday afternoon and had destroyed at least 30 structures.

There were no confirmed fatalities in the Thomas fire as of 2 p.m., authorities said.

Southern California has been under red-flag weather conditions since Monday, with “the strongest and longest duration Santa Ana wind event we have seen so far this season” expected through at least Thursday, the National Weather Service said.

The dry, gusty Santa Ana winds will continue for at least the next three days, the National Weather Service said.

“Generally, it’s awful fire weather today, tomorrow and Thursday,” said forecaster Ryan Kittell. “The winds we’re seeing right now are … plenty strong to drive a fire.”

It doesn’t matter that the winds are relatively cool compared to typical Santa Anas because wind gusts are so powerful and dry, he said.

Ventura County fire officials reported Monday night that one person was killed in a traffic accident on a road closed due to the Thomas fire. But at about 6 a.m. Tuesday, authorities said no human fatalities were confirmed — although they added that one dog had died.

At least 1,000 homes in Ventura, Santa Paula and Ojai were evacuated.

More than 260,000 customers in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties lost power as the fire raged. By noon Tuesday 15,000 homes in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties were still without power, said Southern California Edison spokesman Paul Netter.

More homes may lose power as the fires continue to spread, and some may be without power for days, Netter said.

“We’re encouraging conservation because of the power fluctuations,” he said. “Every little bit helps when it comes to maintaining power as we restore it.”

Just north of Foothill Boulevard, along Hilltop Drive, Mark Urban, 53, took a moment about 7 a.m. Tuesday to inspect the front of his home, where at least two spot fires had broken out; one was put out by firefighters and the other by himself, using a garden hose.

Urban said he and his wife began evacuating their Spanish-style home about 11 p.m. Monday and headed to the Ventura fairgrounds. About 1 a.m., though, he returned to grab more belongings and decided to stay to defend their home with a hose, he said.

“I just kept hitting the hot spots,” Urban said.

A crowd gathered Tuesday morning in the street at the top of a hilly Santa Paula neighborhood, watching as black smoke and flames crept along a tawny ridge near dozens of white, tan and pink houses.

Gusts ripped red flowers off a bougainvillea and sent flames billowing upward a few hundred feet from houses along Coronado Circle.

Doctors and nurses in scrubs who had stepped out of nearby Santa Paula Hospital put on face masks and pulled out cellphones to record the fire.

The hospital was closed Tuesday to incoming patients and all surgeries were canceled, according to a doctor and a technician who were not authorized to talk to the media. About 16 patients remained in the 28-bed facility and could be quickly evacuated if fire officials gave the word, they said.

Beverly Moore stood on 10th Street with a black hoodie drawn tightly over her head to block the strong winds, watching the fire.

Moore moved to Coronado Circle about eight years ago, when the neighborhood was new. She knew fire was a risk, because the street opens onto hundreds of acres of open space that is covered in dry brush, she said. Even so, she wasn’t prepared to watch the fire come so close to her house.

In her rush to leave home, Moore said, she’d grabbed her violin, but forgot her jewelry and her daughter’s guitar.

Police cars blocked the street, stopping residents from returning to their homes. A Santa Paula police officer allowed Moore back in, telling her to hurry.

She returned 15 minutes later, smiling, her jewelry in a brown shopping bag, her father’s will in a manila envelope, and her daughter’s guitar slung across her back.

“It’s all she wanted,” Moore said. “I’ve done what I could.”

By late Tuesday morning, evacuees were beginning to learn the fate of their homes.

Darlene Gonzalez and her husband scrambled to evacuate Monday by 6 p.m., just after they got off work. They fled with clothes, passports and other paperwork, but left her husband’s most cherished possessions in the garage: A 1959 Chevrolet El Camino and a 1928 Ford (“a Bonnie and Clyde car,” Gonzalez said).

“You work so hard all your life, and now this,” Gonzalez said. “But what can you do? Fire is fire.”

At least two buildings on the campus of Vista Del Mar Hospital burned down as the Thomas fire ravaged the canyons above Ventura.

The hospital treats adolescents and adults with mental health issues, and among its specialties is treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder.

Patients were evacuated and by Tuesday morning, two buildings were completely destroyed by flames, with the rubble of stucco walls and clay roofs smoldering under the smoky sky.

“There’s a huge need for this facility,” said Roger Case, 76, explaining that it welcomes patients from Fresno to the San Fernando Valley. Case is an advisory board member.

In addition to serving about 80 patients at a time, the facility also employs about 230 people.

Many have found their way to evacuation centers, waiting out the fire.

Inside the shelter at the Ventura County fairgrounds Tuesday morning, some volunteers handed out water and bananas to evacuees who spent the night. Others grabbed the green cots that crowded the concrete floor and walked them over to the larger livestock shelter where the evacuees were being moved.

Rudy Avendano and his family voluntarily evacuated their home on Richmond Road about 3 a.m. His daughter Felicia had woken up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom when she saw flashing lights on the street.

She stepped outside and asked the police if they were being evacuated.

“We strongly suggest it,” she remembered the officer saying.

She quickly woke her parents and two sisters. They grabbed the items they’d packed earlier in the day — clothes, blankets, documents, photo albums and a mandolin — and jumped into their cars with their pit bull-Labrador mix, Bear.

Avendano, 60, said he saw a continuous ribbon of orange flames licking the hills on the drive to the fairgrounds.

Throughout the drive, he said, he thought of the extra food he should have thrown in the car. A gallon of Sunny Delight and a box of crackers from Trader Joe’s weren’t enough, he said with a laugh.

Heavy winds and dry air could prolong Ventura County wildfire for weeks, officials say
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Thu 07 Dec 2017, 23:23:47

ol, good find, but about 36 hours out of date, which with these fast moving fires is approximately more than a lifetime!

Here's the update:

http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la- ... story.html
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby onlooker » Thu 07 Dec 2017, 23:48:34

Some NASA satellite views of wildfires only 10 hours ago
https://www.yahoo.com/news/striking-nas ... 52302.html
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby Subjectivist » Fri 08 Dec 2017, 04:04:57

[sarc]Gee this is great! California will have a housing boom post haste to replace these fire losses![/sarc]
II Chronicles 7:14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Fri 08 Dec 2017, 14:45:18

More context:

California's Climate Emergency
Fires continue to burn Southern California, and climate scientists have warned us for years that the region was entering a year-round fire regime


For years, climate scientists have warned us that California was entering a year-round fire regime. For years, climate campaigners have been wondering what it would take to get people to wake up to the urgency of cutting fossil fuel emissions. For years, we've been tip-toeing as a civilization towards a point of no return.

That time is now.

The advent of uncontrollable wintertime megafires in California is a turning point in America's struggle to contain the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Conditions that led to the Thomas fire won't happen every year, but the fact that they're happening at all should shock us. ...


http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/fea ... cy-w513659

I have said elsewhere that the rich and poor are equally susceptible to these kinds of extreme and rapid fires...but...maybe not?


“One Fire Truck Guarded Every Three Houses” in Wealthy Los Angeles Neighborhood Last Night

https://www.spin.com/2017/12/skirball-fire-bel-air/
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Fri 08 Dec 2017, 15:22:21

In the entire CalFire history (from late 1800s), there is only one other #wildfire in SoCal in Dec. >50K acres. That was 1958 Stewart Fire

https://twitter.com/pyrogeog?ref_src=tw ... 2520to%252

Good video compilation here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBkNejztEpU
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 10 Dec 2017, 14:13:34


#ThomasFire now the 10th largest fire in California state history. And it's happening in December.


https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status ... 8403040256

Furthermore:

Latest CA fire outlook:

–Offshore winds locked in until at least Friday (a streak of 13 days in a row).

–No rain in Southern California until at least Dec. 26th (16 days from now.)

–Temperatures remain ~10°F above normal for foreseeable future.

Not good. ...


https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status ... 1434116101
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby vox_mundi » Sun 10 Dec 2017, 16:10:29

Another Way the Rich are Different: 'Concierge-Level' Fire Protection

... AIG's Wildfire Protection Unit, part of its Private Client Group, is offered only to homeowners in California's most affluent ZIP Codes -- including Malibu, Beverly Hills, Newport Beach and Menlo Park -- and a dozen Colorado resort communities. It covers about 2,000 policyholders, who pay premiums of at least $10,000 a year and own homes with a value of at least $1 million. Video

"Just picture it," said Moore, whose house was sprayed by Firebreak early Monday. "Here you are in that raging wildfire. Smoke everywhere. Flames everywhere. Plumes of smoke coming up over the hills. Here's a couple guys showing up in what looks like a firetruck who are experts trained in fighting wildfire and they're there specifically to protect your home. . . . It was really, really comforting."
... survival shouldn't be a luxury item

... "What we have is a dangerous confluence of events: underfunded states, increasingly inefficient disaster response, a loss of faith in the public sphere . . . and a growing part of the economy that sees disaster as a promising new market," said Naomi Klein, whose new book, "The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism," looks at, among other things, the response to Hurricane Katrina.

Klein said AIG offers a glimpse into the future of what she calls "disaster apartheid," in which the affluent are better equipped for emergencies.

"You can't fault businesses for seeing an opportunity, and you can't fault individuals for wanting to protect their property. Pretty much anyone who could afford it would want it," she said. "But survival shouldn't be a luxury item."

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California wildfires: Businesses face ruin as blaze rages

Much of California's avocado crop has been destroyed by wildfires that have ripped through the southern part of the state, industry experts say.

"We've lost at least several hundred acres of avocados, probably more," the California Avocado Commission told agriculture news site AgNet West.

About 90% of US avocados are grown in California, and the industry is worth millions to the economy.
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby Plantagenet » Sun 10 Dec 2017, 18:00:44

Thomas fire now headed north towards the beautiful beach town of Santa Barbara---evacuations ordered in parts of Carpenteria and Montecito

california-wildfires-thomas-fire-santa-barbara-evacuation

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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby asg70 » Sun 10 Dec 2017, 19:50:24

I haven't kept up with this but I'm sure PStarr will continue with his riff that none of this is climate-change and just incompetent forest management and building patterns.

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Hubbert's curve, meet S-curve: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Re: Wildfires/Forestfires 2017

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 10 Dec 2017, 23:02:38

:)

Meanwhile, Thomas is now the 5th biggest fire in modern CA history.

http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la- ... story.html
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