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So Much Natural Gas—But Where to Put It?

General discussions of the systemic, societal and civilisational effects of depletion.

So Much Natural Gas—But Where to Put It?

Unread postby AdamB » Thu 23 Nov 2017, 11:23:45


fotosuper/Thinkstock Press spacebar to see more share options. In the nineties, a bumper sticker with the words “happiness is multiple pipelines” could be seen slapped on cars from Houston to Washington, D.C., to Baku, Azerbaijan. Though that slogan referred to the effort to build other pipelines that bypass Russia to move oil out of the Caspian Basin, the sentiment applies today in Texas, too. There are simply not enough pipelines to take away the natural gas being produced in the Permian Basin to markets where it can be used. The Wall Street Journal highlighted this issue in a Monday story: Pipelines running from the region’s Permian Basin to the Gulf Coast’s chemical plants, cities and export terminals are essentially full. Drillers in the Rockies and Canada already supply markets in the north and west. There is plenty of room on pipelines running south to Mexico,


So Much Natural Gas—But Where to Put It?
Peak oil in 2020: And here is why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2b3ttqYDwF0
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Re: So Much Natural Gas—But Where to Put It?

Unread postby Outcast_Searcher » Fri 24 Nov 2017, 16:37:10

AdamB wrote:

fotosuper/Thinkstock Press spacebar to see more share options. In the nineties, a bumper sticker with the words “happiness is multiple pipelines” could be seen slapped on cars from Houston to Washington, D.C., to Baku, Azerbaijan. Though that slogan referred to the effort to build other pipelines that bypass Russia to move oil out of the Caspian Basin, the sentiment applies today in Texas, too. There are simply not enough pipelines to take away the natural gas being produced in the Permian Basin to markets where it can be used. The Wall Street Journal highlighted this issue in a Monday story: Pipelines running from the region’s Permian Basin to the Gulf Coast’s chemical plants, cities and export terminals are essentially full. Drillers in the Rockies and Canada already supply markets in the north and west. There is plenty of room on pipelines running south to Mexico,


So Much Natural Gas—But Where to Put It?

I remember growing up in the 70's when natural gas bills at our house in the winter were starting to resemble our mortgage, per my dad. The assumption was that the price trend could only be up.

Now here we are, where perhaps some wells in the Permian Basin will be capped if more capacity isn't found to move/store the gas.

The hits just keep on coming, and not in a good way for the short term hard crash doomers.
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Re: So Much Natural Gas—But Where to Put It?

Unread postby Subjectivist » Fri 24 Nov 2017, 20:49:04

Question, the county just south of Toledo has a lot of old oil wells that are no longer pumping fluid and a brand new Natural Gas pipeline was just commissioned going through it about ten miles south of Toledo. If storage is an issue why not jump pump gas into the old oil field when needed for short term storage?
II Chronicles 7:14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.
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Re: So Much Natural Gas—But Where to Put It?

Unread postby coffeeguyzz » Fri 24 Nov 2017, 21:25:53

OS
I was just doing some quick calculations on the cost for electricity per kilowatt hour for CCGT plants in Ohio and PA.
Pretty cheap.
But that also applies to the houses that heat, cook, warm water with piped in gas.
A single new well coming online in Pennsylvania will produce 5 Billion cubic feet first year, 25 billion over 40 year lifetime, and cost less than $8 million.
Every 1 Bcf can provide annual household electricity for 10,000 homes.
A standard 4 well pad - costing less than 35 million - 20 Bcf first year, juice for maybe 200,000 homes ... half a million people, easy.

Sub ... That would be the Nexus, with the Rover just a little farther south.
Both pipes will be injecting into existing storage in Michigan.

However, there are huge plans to develop new, vast underground storage in both West Virginia and southeast Ohio for NGLs.
Mountaineer Storage is the outfit leading the charge with a bunch of info online.
Basically, they plan to hollow out huge salt caverns with hydraulics, from what I understand, and store liquids, not methane, for future processing.
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