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The Greenland Thread

Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Sun 02 Oct 2016, 13:31:38

Subjectivist wrote:Anyone know what the Petermann Ice Shelf did this summer? I searched Google news and didn't find much aside from the CBS article from last winter.

The latest clear picture from MODIS shows nothing unusual.
https://lance.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/im ... 6272.terra
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby litesong » Sun 02 Oct 2016, 13:50:33

Subjectivist wrote:Anyone know what the Petermann Ice Shelf did this summer? I searched Google news and didn't find much aside from the CBS article from last winter.


If you haven't seen this PDF from August 2016, glad to help. If you have, sorry I didn't help.
http://muenchow.cms.udel.edu/papers/Mue ... 16-TOS.pdf
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 02 Oct 2016, 14:08:30

Sub, here's a thread that covers developments of Petermann: http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.p ... ,53.0.html

Nothing posted recently, though, I see.
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Mon 03 Oct 2016, 06:39:01

Nice clear, cloud free, picture yesterday from modis. Looking at it with the largest pixel size (250m) at first I thought I say a crack about ten miles back from the face showing as a zig zaged black line but looking closer you can see two more of the same lines on solid rock to the west. Must be some flaw in the digital photographs. What you can see clearly is the shadows cast by the cliffs on the north side of the glacier. You can clearly see their length diminish as you move south from the face back towards the ice cap letting you visualize the slope of the ice from the sea back to the cap.
https://lance.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/im ... terra.250m
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby Cid_Yama » Fri 18 Nov 2016, 17:46:33

Greenland's Getting Warmer, But Farmers There Are Struggling More Than Ever
Hansen's sheep farm, called Tasilikulooq, sits amid glassy lakes and sloping hills. When I first arrive here, his red tractor sits next to a dusty snowmobile, a reminder of the punishing cold he and his family brave each winter. But it's not the brutality of the coming winter that concerns Hansen right now. He's worried about the travails of the summer.

That's because it has been horribly dry here for months. Hansen fears that his flock of sheep might be malnourished if the pastures don't soon recover from a hot, dry summer so he can harvest the grass for winter hay feeding.

"The seasons here have been very difficult lately," says Hansen. The average animal in his flock in the summer of 2015 was 2 to 4 pounds lighter than normal. Hot summers over the past decade have cost him thousands of dollars in losses, he says.

Since Greenland's 60,000 citizens rely almost entirely on food imports from Denmark and other European countries, farmers and officials have hoped that steadily rising temperatures, and shorter winters, would spur a growth in agriculture here. (Summer temperatures have risen about 2 degrees Fahrenheit in southern Greenland since 1975, increasing the growing season by two weeks.) And media stories about Arctic gardening in greenhouses or the warming temperatures have hyped the possibilities.

Instead, says Aqalooraq Frederiksen, a third-generation farmer who works at a regional farmer assistance bureau, the dry summers are diminishing the prospects for Greenlandic farming.

Recent summers have been both warm and dry, causing drought in south Greenland, says John Cappelen, a climatologist at Danish Meteorological Institute, which maintains climate data for the island.

"In 2015, for example, we didn't have spring," said Greenlandic agricultural consultant Henrik Motzfeldt Egede. "It just went from a very cold winter to a hot, dry summer." He says growth in pastures for livestock was "very bad as a result." Meanwhile, the number of sheep farmers in Greenland has fallen from 74 in 1983 to about 37 farms today, says Frederiksen.

A handful of farmers have tried to grow vegetables for human consumption in gardens or fields, but almost all have found it unprofitable since yields are low and there's limited availability of farm labor. So the few dozen experiments with growing vegetables here, including a few greenhouses, only serve to feed the families that maintain the gardens.

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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby vox_mundi » Thu 01 Dec 2016, 15:44:42

Just in time for 'iceberg season' ...

Full-size Titanic replica being built in China

Image
The replica will be the world's first full-size version of the ill-fated Harland and Wolff liner.

A full-size replica of the Belfast-built Titanic is to become the top attraction at a Chinese theme park. Construction of the 269m long ship, which will be docked permanently on a reservoir in a rural area of Sichuan province, began on Thursday.

The Chinese replica will feature an interior reflecting some of the grandeur of the original, including a ballroom, theatre, swimming pool and first-class cabins - with the addition of wi-fi. (They'll add the lifeboats when it arrives in New York)

Domestic tourism is booming in China, promoted by the government as a way of fuelling consumer-driven growth rather than its decades-old model of investment and industry.

Image

What could go wrong?
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby Cid_Yama » Sun 04 Dec 2016, 13:06:43

Greenland’s Glacial Earthquakes Are Booming Kira Olsen
In Greenland, earthquakes generated by icebergs calving off marine glaciers are multiplying fast. From 1993-2010, 305 events were recorded. 2011-2013 saw 145 more, boosting the earthquake catalog by nearly half. Seismicity has risen especially in western Greenland, and activity has started up in at least one previously quiescent glacier. Such marine fronts now account for half of Greenland’s yearly ice loss.
Wednesday, Dec 14, 1:40-6 p.m., Moscone South Posters. C33C-0839

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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby dohboi » Wed 01 Mar 2017, 16:45:46

70% of GIS melt is from the surface rather than from calving, and that involves a complex set of feedbacks:

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6327/788
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby joewp » Mon 06 Mar 2017, 08:41:49

Greenland Meltdown: The Ice Is Changing Colors | Pulitzer Center
But the balance tipped dramatically between 2011 and 2014, when satellite data and modeling suggested that 70% of the annual 269 billion tons of snow and ice shed by Greenland was lost through surface melt, not calving. The accelerating surface melt has doubled Greenland's contribution to global sea level rise since 1992–2011, to 0.74 mm per year. "Nobody expected the ice sheet to lose so much mass so quickly," says geophysicist Isabella Velicogna of the University of California, Irvine. "Things are happening a lot faster than we expected."

It's urgent to figure out why, and how the melting might evolve in the future, because Greenland holds the equivalent of more than 7 m of sea level rise in its thick mantle of ice. Glaciologists were already fully occupied trying to track and forecast the surge in glacial calving. Now, they are striving to understand the complex feedbacks that are speeding up surface melting

Although the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world, high temperatures alone can't explain the precipitous erosion of Greenland's ice. Unseasonably warm summers appear to be abetted by microbes and algae that grow on the increasingly wet surface of the ice sheet, producing pigments that boost the ice's absorption of solar energy. Soot and dust that blow from lower latitudes and darken the ice also appear to be playing a role, as are changes in weather patterns that increasingly steer warm, moist air over the vulnerable ice.


The way these feed backs are going, it seems like everything out there wants a warmer planet. Wake up those frozen microbes in Greenland and they say "Hey, this is an ok temperature, but mind if we warm it up a bit ourselves, too? Thanks".

Which is of course why "Things are happening a lot faster than we expected.".
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Mon 06 Mar 2017, 09:12:08

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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby joewp » Mon 06 Mar 2017, 11:43:54

<sarcasm>
Oh good, vt. I feel much better now that I've heard your opinion.
</sarcasm>
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby vtsnowedin » Mon 06 Mar 2017, 14:08:42

joewp wrote:<sarcasm>
Oh good, vt. I feel much better now that I've heard your opinion.
</sarcasm>

Why thank you I try to be of help. 8)
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby onlooker » Sat 01 Apr 2017, 14:01:11

https://insideclimatenews.org/news/3103 ... g-ice-melt
Greenland's Coastal Ice Passed a Climate Tipping Point 20 Years Ago, Study Says
You can ignore reality but not its consequences
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 02 Apr 2017, 03:27:55

More and more points seem to be tipping these days!
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby joewp » Sun 09 Apr 2017, 15:04:23

Inside Arctic Ice Lies a Frozen Rainforest of Microorganisms — Arctic Deeply
Vast Arctic landscapes may appear to be desolate, barren places, but take a look through a microscope and you’ll see thriving ecosystems. The top few meters of ice are home to an estimated hundred million billion trillion (or 10 to the power of 29) microorganisms.

That’s why Joseph Cook, a researcher at the University of Sheffield in the U.K., describes it as a frozen rainforest. “I think it’s a very widely held misconception that Arctic ice and snow is sterile and lifeless,” Cook says. “That’s just not the case. It’s fundamentally biological.”

As a glacial microbiologist, Cook studies the things that live and grow on the ice, how they change the ice’s colour, and in turn, the rate at which the ice melts.

“It’s not a new hypothesis,” he says. “It’s just that in a warming climate, these things take on a new significance, and it’s suddenly become a lot more important to understand all the drivers in the ice melting.”

In addition to algae, Cook studies another microbial habitat called cryoconite holes. These are holes formed in the ice by a microorganism called cyanobacteria, which acts like a net on the ice, catching dust particles and mineral fragments and bundles them into granules. Because these are a darker color than the ice, they melt the ice underneath them, forming holes.

The holes play host to a small ecosystem: cyanobacteria and algae photosynthesize within them, then other microorganisms feed on the carbon produced by the photosynthesis.
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby dissident » Sun 09 Apr 2017, 16:59:39

joewp wrote:Inside Arctic Ice Lies a Frozen Rainforest of Microorganisms — Arctic Deeply
Vast Arctic landscapes may appear to be desolate, barren places, but take a look through a microscope and you’ll see thriving ecosystems. The top few meters of ice are home to an estimated hundred million billion trillion (or 10 to the power of 29) microorganisms.

That’s why Joseph Cook, a researcher at the University of Sheffield in the U.K., describes it as a frozen rainforest. “I think it’s a very widely held misconception that Arctic ice and snow is sterile and lifeless,” Cook says. “That’s just not the case. It’s fundamentally biological.”

As a glacial microbiologist, Cook studies the things that live and grow on the ice, how they change the ice’s colour, and in turn, the rate at which the ice melts.

“It’s not a new hypothesis,” he says. “It’s just that in a warming climate, these things take on a new significance, and it’s suddenly become a lot more important to understand all the drivers in the ice melting.”

In addition to algae, Cook studies another microbial habitat called cryoconite holes. These are holes formed in the ice by a microorganism called cyanobacteria, which acts like a net on the ice, catching dust particles and mineral fragments and bundles them into granules. Because these are a darker color than the ice, they melt the ice underneath them, forming holes.

The holes play host to a small ecosystem: cyanobacteria and algae photosynthesize within them, then other microorganisms feed on the carbon produced by the photosynthesis.


A biotic feedback. I bet few even knew these were taking place. Reality is always bigger than any human understanding of it.
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby chilyb » Tue 11 Apr 2017, 16:18:44

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 73245/full

Bed elevation of Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland,
from high-resolution airborne gravity and other data


Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland, which hold s a 0.6 -m sea level volume
equivalent, has been speeding up and retreating since the late 1990s . Inter-
pretation of its retreat has been hindered by difficulties in measuring its ice
thickness with airborne radar depth sounders. Here, we employ high-resolution ,
helicopter-borne gravity data from 2012 to reconstruct its bed elevation within
50 km of the ocean margin using a three-dimensional inversion constrained
by fjord bathymetry data offshore an d a mass conservation algorithm inland.
We find the glacier trough to be asymmetric and several 100 m deeper t h a n
estimated previously in the lower p a r t. Fr om 1996-2016, the grounding line
migrated at 0.6 km/yr from 700 m to 1,100 m depth. Upstream, the bed drops
to 1,600 m over 10 km then slowly climbs to 1,200 m dept h in 40 km. Jakob-
shavn Isbræ will continue to retreat along a retrograde slope for decades to
come.


The new bed elevation confirms earlier studies [e.g. Thomas, 2004; Joughin et al., 2012]
that JI is undergoing a marine ice sheet instability since it is retreating along mostly a
retrograde bed. The retreat was likely triggered by an increase in ice shelf melt rate due to
the intrusion of warmer AW in the fjord [Holland et al., 2008] . The current retreat rate of
0.6 km/yr is half as large as that observed in West Antarctica for Pine Island and Thwaites
glaciers(1 km/yr ) and one third as large as that experienced by Smith Glacier (2 km/y r )
[Rignot et al. , 2014]. These values place upper bounds on the current rate of retreat of
large glaciers undergoing a marine instability. JI is probably retreating slower because it
is confined in a deep trough with narrow sides that provide strong lateral resistance to
flow.
The GB MF bed data provide a significantly improved description of bed topography
in the lower reaches of the glacier, in reasonable agreement with the MC reconstruction.
This new topography will be of interest to modeling studies used to project or reco n st r u ct
the glacier evolution and t h e ocean circulation in the fjord. A simila approach should
be used in fjords oft en choked up with iceberg debris, e.g. Helheim or Kangerdlugssuaq
glaciers, and with poor radio echosounding data near the calving fronts.
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Re: The Greenland Thread -Accumulation

Unread postby jawagord » Wed 14 Jun 2017, 14:03:00

The Danish Meteorological Institute who've been monitoring Greenland ice mass for the last 36 years show the snow/ice accumulation the 2016-2017 winter/spring was a record high, near 700 gigatons (GT). According to the Danes, accumulation has exceed melting every year on record, but with ice flowing to the ocean and glaciers calving off into the sea there has been a net loss of mass on average of 200 GT per year. At this rate Greenland's 2.5 million GT of ice will be completely gone in 15,000 years. Maybe we can hold off on the handwringing, sandbagging and dyke building for awhile?

http://beta.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maaling ... ss-budget/
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby Azothius » Sun 18 Jun 2017, 16:30:24

Four missing after tsunami strikes Greenland coast


http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-40320629

The authorities believe a magnitude four earthquake caused the tsunami.

According to the police chief, it struck off Uummannaq, a small island well above the Arctic Circle.

Meteorologist Trine Dahl Jensen told Danish news agency Ritzau that for such an earthquake to hit Greenland was "not normal", as she warned of the risk of aftershocks.
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Re: The Greenland Thread

Unread postby dohboi » Sun 18 Jun 2017, 16:48:15

Thanks. I posted it in a tsunami thread, but it's really most relevant here.

It prompts many questions:

Exactly how 'not normal' is this?

Was the earthquake that caused it in some way influenced by the massive losses of land ice in the area? If so, might we expect ever more of the same, and ever larger?

How big was the wave and how much of the coast was affected? Were glaciers etc impacted directly by it?

....all sorts of possible reinforcing feedbacks possible here, it seems to me.
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