Donate Bitcoin

Donate Paypal


PeakOil is You

PeakOil is You

International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Mon 23 Dec 2013, 21:13:56

Why 2014 is a critical year for the politics of climate change

The formal processes of the UNFCCC (UN climate body) will mosey on to plot the structure and lay out the policy options for the 2015 agreement. But it is the informal processes which have the most potential to shape the national interest debates in many critical countries.

In the past, the political dividends created from the informal processes have remained invisible to the naked UNFCCC negotiator eye until the ‘grand finale’, often resulting in considerable levels of frustration for those of us who track the COPs (annual UN climate summit) and intercessionals (smaller UN meetings).

Whilst it’s the informal processes (underpinned by national actions) that help shape the politics of the international climate regime, these fora receive less attention and management than their more formal counterparts.

The run up to Copenhagen was a prime example where climate was woven into a variety of informal venues only to create confusion about how to capture the momentum.



There will be lots happening in the run up to Paris. Choreographing is required to construct and prioritise the right dialogues, with the right audiences and venues at the right time.

Two critical audiences are Leaders and Real-Economy decision makers. In the run up to 2015, Leaders will deal with many issues and trade-offs relating to climate change.

In order to secure more ambition, there are some critical issues Heads of State and Government must internalise in order to inform the trade-offs and ambition. It is essential that Leaders understand their strategic interest for a successful 2015 agreement, and critically understand the consequences of failure.

What would failure mean for the future of multilateralism, their bilateral relations and for their prosperity? Several informal processes throughout 2014 provide an opportunity to craft this understanding.



In addition to the multiplicity of informal processes, 2014 also hosts a range of domestic elections in Brazil, South Africa, India, European Parliament, European Commission and Indonesia which provide an opportunity to shape the national interest debate on climate change, and create more political shifts internationally.

The potential for political dynamism in 2014 makes next year distinct. A plan to harvest the politics will be essential, as it will not happen organically.


Image

rtcc

Marry Christmas and Happy New Year!!
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 1 (merged)

Unread postby peripato » Mon 23 Dec 2013, 21:27:53

americandream wrote:
Graeme wrote:I'm apprehensive too. It's our last chance for an international agreement. Some would say that it is already too late. . .


It's not gonna happen. What instead will happen is that the denial will go up a few more notches. Cap the system and accumulation goes into reverse and it collapses. They aren't going to sign up to that, climate be damned.

I'd have to agree, nothing substantial will ever be done because for people economic growth is everything. What politician could survive running on an austerity ticket? Even as the system goes down, no matter how many slaps in the face we get as we go from from one disaster to another, because there are still profits to be made.
"Don’t panic, Wall St. is safe!"
User avatar
peripato
Light Sweet Crude
Light Sweet Crude
 
Posts: 1335
Joined: Tue 03 May 2005, 02:00:00
Location: Reality

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 1 (merged)

Unread postby americandream » Mon 23 Dec 2013, 22:57:27

peripato wrote:
americandream wrote:
Graeme wrote:I'm apprehensive too. It's our last chance for an international agreement. Some would say that it is already too late. . .


It's not gonna happen. What instead will happen is that the denial will go up a few more notches. Cap the system and accumulation goes into reverse and it collapses. They aren't going to sign up to that, climate be damned.

I'd have to agree, nothing substantial will ever be done because for people economic growth is everything. What politician could survive running on an austerity ticket? Even as the system goes down, no matter how many slaps in the face we get as we go from from one disaster to another, because there are still profits to be made.


Exactly. Everyone wants to live like America down to the home and hog. From the urban housewife to the would be hard countryman, America sets the tone. Both sides of the equator. American excess in turn was a reaction of Europe's ragged displaced to their new found freedom. It is the new global culture of life on the edge of extremes. We have a long haul back to sanity and its a tough one given the our global corporate economy is increasingly fashioned from this culture.
americandream
permanently banned
 
Posts: 8653
Joined: Mon 18 Oct 2004, 02:00:00

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Wed 01 Jan 2014, 18:02:53

What climate action can we expect in 2014?

While the majority of countries at the Warsaw UN Climate Talks seemed to be in denial about how the world has changed since the UNFCCC (the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) was conceived, body languages – and outcomes - were clear.

Developed economies are clearly split between the ostrich-like Australia, Canada and Japan, either in denial or in outright obstructive mode; a schizophrenic US, rapidly emerging as the number one fossil fuel energy producer in the world yet cracking down on coal-burning power plants in the U.S. and abroad; and do gooders at the European Union, hampered by a slow-moving European governance structure. Without a unified front from the formerly rich countries, almost all of whom have tighter purses after the 2008 crisis, a cacophony of positions emerges at the UN Climate Talks but little of substance is agreed on. Don’t expect this to change at the UN Climate Talks in Lima in 2014 or in Paris in 2015.


Bottom-up change

Expect two dynamics to drive climate action over the next few years: Baby steps (in other words no major initiatives, short of a climate change-induced calamity which mobilizes action on a big scale and overcomes the current political inertia) and a bottom-up approach, taking over with rapidly increasing momentum. Underpinning the bottom up approach are a confluence of factors likely to sound much more strident notes in 2014.

First, there seems to be more effective pressure from activists and fractivists to fight fossil fuel subsidies worldwide. While 80% of humanity lives on less than $10 a day, unnecessary, wasteful fossil fuel subsidies benefiting profitable polluters such as the oil and gas or the steel industries amount to $5 billion a day (!).

Second, climate action is increasingly dependent on the private sector (which already accounts for 62% of climate finance flows according to the Climate Policy Initiative) and crystallized around carbon pricing: According to the Brookings Institute, from 2013 onward, 3 billion people in 36 countries, 11 sub-national jurisdictions in the United States and Canada, and seven cities and provinces in China (and from 2016, all of China) are covered by Emissions Trading Schemes. Other countries are considering market options or have already implemented them, for example India via the introduction of traded renewable energy certificates. The private sector likely will be implementing more climate friendly projects, incentivised by renewable energy support or its mirror image, decreasing fossil fuel subsidies.


independent
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Wed 29 Jan 2014, 23:07:07

Snowden Docs: U.S. Spied on Negotiators At 2009 Climate Summit

The National Security Agency monitored the communications of other governments ahead of and during the 2009 United Nations climate negotiations in Copenhagen, Denmark, according to the latest document from whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The document, with portions marked "top secret," indicates that the NSA was monitoring the communications of other countries ahead of the conference, and intended to continue doing so throughout the meeting. Posted on an internal NSA website on Dec. 7, 2009, the first day of the Copenhagen summit, it states that "analysts here at NSA, as well as our Second Party partners, will continue to provide policymakers with unique, timely, and valuable insights into key countries' preparations and goals for the conference, as well as the deliberations within countries on climate change policies and negotiation strategies."

"Second Party partners" refers to the intelligence agencies of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, with which the U.S. has an intelligence-sharing relationship. "While the outcome of the Copenhagen Climate Change Conference remains uncertain, signals intelligence will undoubtedly play a significant role in keeping our negotiators as well informed as possible throughout the 2-week event," the document says.


huffingtonpost
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Plantagenet » Wed 29 Jan 2014, 23:28:11

So Obama used the NSA to spy on the other climate negotiators in Copenhagen? Obama knew all their negotiating positions in advance and he still couldn't get a deal done?

Thats like playing poker and knowing all the other player's cards and still losing!

SHEEEESH! :roll:
User avatar
Plantagenet
Expert
Expert
 
Posts: 20606
Joined: Mon 09 Apr 2007, 02:00:00
Location: Alaska (its much bigger than Texas).

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Thu 30 Jan 2014, 00:01:39

Yes, other countries will now be aware of what happened in Copenhagen. It doesn't inspire confidence in the US negotiations!! Here are how USC sees it:

"It can't help in the sense that if people think you're trying to get an unfair advantage or manipulate the process, they're not going to have much trust in you," said Alden Meyer, director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists and a seasoned veteran of the U.N. climate negotiations. Meyer said he worried that the disclosure might cause the parties to "start becoming more cautious, more secretive, and less forthcoming" in the negotiations. "That's not a good dynamic in a process where you're trying to encourage collaboration, compromise, and working together, as opposed to trying to get a comparative advantage," he said.


Obama will now have to do something extraordinary like disapprove Keystone to ensure that other countries will respect his position.
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Tanada » Thu 30 Jan 2014, 08:04:52

Graeme wrote:Yes, other countries will now be aware of what happened in Copenhagen. It doesn't inspire confidence in the US negotiations!! Here are how USC sees it:

"It can't help in the sense that if people think you're trying to get an unfair advantage or manipulate the process, they're not going to have much trust in you," said Alden Meyer, director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists and a seasoned veteran of the U.N. climate negotiations. Meyer said he worried that the disclosure might cause the parties to "start becoming more cautious, more secretive, and less forthcoming" in the negotiations. "That's not a good dynamic in a process where you're trying to encourage collaboration, compromise, and working together, as opposed to trying to get a comparative advantage," he said.


In this case if the USA knew exactly how the other participants felt and negotiations failed it can mean only one thing. The USA WANTED the negotiations to fail and in effect knew exactly what to demand to cause that to happen.

Nobody with any sense would trust any promise from a politician, but a politician who lies to your face and gets caught who comes back to you and says Trust Me, I Am On Your Side...???
I should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, write, balance accounts, build a wall, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, pitch manure, program a computer, cook, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
User avatar
Tanada
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14093
Joined: Thu 28 Apr 2005, 02:00:00
Location: South West shore Lake Erie, OH, USA

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby flamingyak » Thu 30 Jan 2014, 08:57:43

Climate Policy - there are huge violations of carbon emissions occuring in North Dakota through FLARING. The law can, if enforced, requrie producers to collect and transport for sale the natural gas associated with Oil Wells. But in a rush for profits, outfits like HESS Corp flare 30% of the associated natural gas produced because building a pipeline to collect and use this hydrocarbon takes too long and delays the gratification of the appetitie for the cash fllow related to Oil Sales, something done to impress Wall Street.

The US needs to simply enforce its own rules, hold E&P producers accoutnable for the carbon footprint, and in the process moderate the rapid increase in oil prodcution to allow infrastructure and other related business to also moderate, build at a safer and more controlled pace.

In the end, it's the rush for profits that fuels mistakes and carelessness in producing oil and gas.
flamingyak
Coal
Coal
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon 02 Dec 2013, 10:29:24

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Thu 30 Jan 2014, 17:11:02

Snowden revelations of NSA spying on Copenhagen climate talks spark anger

Developing countries have reacted angrily to revelations that the United States spied on other governments at the Copenhagen climate summit in 2009.

Documents leaked by Edward Snowden show how the US National Security Agency (NSA) monitored communication between key countries before and during the conference to give their negotiators advance information about other positions at the high-profile meeting where world leaders including Barack Obama, Gordon Brown and Angela Merkel failed to agree to a strong deal on climate change.

Jairam Ramesh, the then Indian environment minister and a key player in the talks that involved 192 countries and 110 heads of state, said: "Why the hell did they do this and at the end of this, what did they get out of Copenhagen? They got some outcome but certainly not the outcome they wanted. It was completely silly of them. First of all, they didn't get what they wanted. With all their hi-tech gizmos and all their snooping, ultimately the Basic countries [Brazil, South Africa, India and China] bailed Obama out. With all their snooping what did they get?"

Martin Khor, an adviser to developing countries at the summit and director of the South Centre thinktank, said: "Would you play poker with someone who can see your cards? Spying on one another like this is absolutely not on. When someone has an upper hand is very disconcerting. There should be an assurance in negotiations like this that powerful players are not going to gain undue advantage with technological surveillance.

"For negotiations as complex as these we need maximum goodwill and trust. It is absolutely critical. If there is anything that prevents a level playing field, that stops negotiations being held on equal grounds. It disrupts the talks," he said.


theguardian

And if that doesn't bode too well for future talks, then there's this:

China, India and Brazil could ‘derail’ UN climate deal says UK envoy

China, India and Brazil are not sending clear signals on whether they will sign a UN-backed global emissions reduction deal next year, says the UK’s top climate diplomat.

Their reluctance to confirm their position within the UN negotiations could still derail the process, warned Sir David King, the UK’s special representative for climate change, at a meeting in Parliament yesterday.

“There are no clear signs from those countries in negotiations that they are giving a green light,” he said, adding that this contrasted with the acute awareness of each state of the impact that climate change would have on their own farmlands, cities and coastlines.

Their silence also conflicted with ambitious action being taken at a domestic level, he said, citing India’s plans to build the world’s largest power station, and China’s position as a leading investor in onshore wind technology.

The UN has called all nations to gather in Paris in 2015 to try to agree a global climate change deal. If it succeeds, it will be the first treaty to commit all countries, both developed and developing, to cutting their emissions.


rtcc
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Fri 31 Jan 2014, 17:28:37

Lima talks should deliver first draft for 2015 climate deal, says Peru minister

The meeting of nearly 200 governments in Peru later this year for a major UN climate change summit must produce the first draft of a global deal to cut emissions, the country's environment minister says.

Speaking to the Guardian, Manuel Pulgar-Vidal said he was aware that slow progress at the last round of talks in Warsaw, Poland, meant significant progress is needed in key areas including climate financing and how to tackle greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation.

The meeting in Lima in December is a staging point towards a crunch summit in Paris in 2015 when it is hoped world leaders will agree, for the first time, a global deal on cutting emissions that includes both rich and poor countries.


theguardian
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Sat 01 Feb 2014, 16:18:44

President Obama State of the Union Address: International Climate Implications

Jake Schmidt, International Climate Policy Director, Washington, DC

Addressing climate change is a key legacy issue for President Obama. His tenure is occurring when the scientific evidence on climate change is irrefutable, the imperative to act immediately is evident, and the ability to act decisively is within grasp. Will his presidency be known as the moment that the U.S. turned the corner and started to seriously address the carbon pollution that is driving climate change while helping tackle this challenge internationally? Last night his State of the Union speech provides signs that his Administration will follow through on its climate plan and build for even deeper action after 2020. Action by the U.S. is critical because the U.S. is a major polluter and because it sends a powerful signal to other countries.

In June President Obama directed the U.S. government to implement existing law through a series of concrete actions to reduce carbon pollution. Strong implementation of these measures will put the U.S. on track to meet the U.S. target to cut carbon pollution 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2020. Chief among the critical measures in the plan is to adopt new safeguards under the Clean Air Act to cut carbon pollution from existing power plants. President Obama signaled he is serious about following through on those safeguards as this aspect of the Climate Action Plan received a particular shout-out, as NRDC’s President discussed. He needs to reject projects that would vastly expand the production of the dirtiest fuels, particularly the proposed Keystone XL pipeline for dirty tar sands oil. And he needs to take strong action to safeguard us from natural gas fracking.

U.S. action at home also sends a powerful signal to the rest of the world since addressing climate change requires that the U.S. cut its own carbon pollution while working aggressively with other countries to cut their pollution. And while not discussed in the State of the Union, President Obama recently outlined his thoughts on the international aspect of climate action in an interview with David Remnick of the New Yorker:

“…my goal has been to make sure that the United States can genuinely assert leadership in this issue [climate change] internationally, that we are considered part of the solution rather than part of the problem…This is why I’m putting a big priority on our carbon action plan here…It’s because it’s very hard for me to get in that conversation [with emerging economies] if we’re making no effort. And it’s not an answer for us to say, Well, since the Chinese and the Indians are the bigger problem, we might as well not even bother.”

With promising signs of action throughout the world including in China and India, the U.S. won’t be acting alone as many of the naysayers continue to assert. Here are just a few examples:

China is beginning to confront its coal pollution in a more systematic way as discussions on a “coal consumption cap” have intensified in recent months. Working closely with Chinese institutions NRDC is helping to show how the government can aggressively confront China’s coal consumption. At the same time China continues to break records for the amount of clean energy deployment as they have reportedly deployed over 12 GW of solar PV last year and is embarking on an effort to China is embarking on a massive effort double the number of wind turbines in the next six years.
India went from having very little solar (17 GW) in early 2010 to over 2 GW by the end of last year. And yesterday the fourth largest state in India announced a game changing new building code that could dramatically cut carbon pollution from its buildings. With buildings accounting for about one-third of the country’s energy-use, this program could set a model for other Indian states and cut a significant amount of India’s climate pollution.
Just last week Europe proposed that it will cut its climate pollution 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. The proposal will go through legislative debate soon, but Europe is clear that it will continue to cut its own carbon pollution as it and other countries prepare for the next round of international commitments in December 2015.
As President Obama seems to recognize U.S. leadership can’t just mean leading by acting at home. So the U.S. Climate Action Plan commits to acting internationally.

His Administration has delivered some important action by moving aggressively to end public financing of overseas coal projects. And his Administration is putting pressure on the key holdouts such as Japan, Germany, France, and others. We’ll be working with others to help secure that the last dominoes fall on overseas public financing of coal projects as way too much scarce public financing is being used to fund overseas coal projects that are driving climate change.

And his Administration committed to helping secure a strong international agreement on climate change. He’ll have a chance in December 2015 to advance that objective when countries are set to agree on the next round of international commitments. That agreement must be built upon strong urgent domestic action coupled with international investments to aid countries in further reducing emissions and adapting to the impacts of climate change.

International leadership must be followed by tangible actions both at home and abroad . The State of the Union and Obama’s recent remarks show that he understands both aspects of action on climate change (as my colleague discussed). Over the coming months and years he’ll get more chances to put a further stamp on his domestic and international climate legacy. That legacy isn’t just about how his Presidency will be recorded in history books, but about whether he sets the U.S. and the world on a clear course to address climate change.


theenergycollective
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Wed 05 Feb 2014, 16:19:24

Michael Bloomberg pledges to help world leaders reach climate deal

New York's former mayor, Mike Bloomberg, said he plans to spend his post-political career helping the United Nations with the “very difficult” and “frustrating” work of herding leaders towards a global climate deal.

Bloomberg, who was named UN special envoy for cities and climate change last week, told a conference call he sees his next mission as getting leaders on side for a global climate deal.

The former mayor put climate change at the top of his agenda during his 12 years running New York, and led an international group of cities acting on climate change, the C40.

He told a conference call organised by the C40 group the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, could use a push getting world leaders to turn up to a summit in New York in September with “concrete solutions” to climate change.

“The secretary general – he has a very difficult job,” Bloomberg told the call. “I think he is probably a little bit frustrated that the nations of the world haven't come together in Rio+20 and all the others things like that have to be taken to the next step. What he is trying to do is get as much help as he can so at the national level they take the bull by the horns, and really make progress.”

He went on: “If I can carry the flag for him, and get him a little bit of information and be a spokesman for him, I would really love to do that,” Bloomberg said.


theguardian
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Mon 10 Feb 2014, 19:06:24

Obama, Hollande Call For 'Ambitious And Inclusive' Global Climate Deal

The presidents of the United States and France have called for a global pact to fight climate change in a joint op-ed published on Monday, the first day of a visit to Washington by French leader Francois Hollande.

He and Barack Obama urged more clean energy partnerships to create jobs, as well as support for developing countries as they shift to low-carbon energy.

"As we work toward next year's climate conference in Paris, we continue to urge all nations to join us in pursuit of an ambitious and inclusive global agreement that reduces greenhouse gas emissions through concrete actions," read the op-ed published in the Washington Post and Le Monde newspapers.


huffingtonpost
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Tue 11 Feb 2014, 18:54:24

Obama Prepares Plan for Deeper Greenhouse Gas Pollution Cuts

The Obama administration is quietly working on new greenhouse gas emissions targets to deliver to the United Nations, even as it struggles to craft regulations that will enable the United States to meet its current carbon-cutting goals.

With Republicans striking out at President Obama's climate change agenda as part of an effort to unseat vulnerable Senate Democrats in November, the administration is hardly advertising its effort. But according to officials involved in the process, the treacherous political terrain has not stopped the administration from forging ahead with developing new emissions goals.

In at least three interagency meetings at the White House since September, administration sources said, officials have debated whether the new goals should extend to 2025 or 2030. They also have laid out the scientific and economic modeling that must be done in the coming months and discussed whether a new target should assume Congress will eventually enact climate legislation or whether the White House must continue to use existing authority under the Clean Air Act to squeeze out more emissions reductions. President Obama's new special adviser, John Podesta, is expected to have an overarching role in the process.



The United States isn't the only government hard at work. The European Union's executive arm earlier this year issued its recommendations for 40 percent carbon cuts going out to 2030. Meanwhile, leaders in China, analysts there say, are seriously debating a 2025 peak year for greenhouse gas emissions as well as an absolute cap on coal within the next five years. As the talks in Warsaw wrapped up late last year, China's lead climate negotiator, Su Wei, told ClimateWire that China has already "launched consultations for actions that would be very important to fight climate change."

In India, the topic is somewhat murkier. Jayanthi Natarajan was replaced as environment minister by the country's minister of petroleum and natural gas -- a move that doesn't bode well for climate action. But even before the switch, Natarajan said her country wasn't in a hurry to develop new climate targets. Speaking to reporters the final night of the Warsaw talks, she said India first wants to see wealthy countries take more ambitious steps to cut emissions prior to 2020 and ramp up finance.

"When that happens, we'd be very happy to talk" about India's post-2020 targets, she said.


scientificamerican
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Graeme » Sat 15 Feb 2014, 15:29:16

U.S., China agree to work on climate change

China and the United States, the world's top emitters of greenhouse gases, pledged on Saturday to work together to attenuate the effects of global climate change.

"China and the United States will work together ... to collaborate through enhanced policy dialogue, including the sharing of information regarding their respective post-2020 plans to limit greenhouse gas emissions," according to a U.S.-China joint statement issued at the end of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry's whirlwind Beijing visit.

The two sides "commit to devote significant effort and resources to secure concrete results" by the Sixth U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue later this year, the statement added.

"Both sides reaffirm their commitment to contribute significantly to successful 2015 global efforts to meet this challenge," the statement said.


reuters
Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells.
Fatih Birol's motto: leave oil before it leaves us.
User avatar
Graeme
Anti-Matter
Anti-Matter
 
Posts: 13257
Joined: Fri 04 Mar 2005, 03:00:00
Location: New Zealand

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby americandream » Sat 15 Feb 2014, 16:37:00

You cannot mitigate a system's fundamental characteristics without destroying the system which in essence will render these talkfests, symbolic.
americandream
permanently banned
 
Posts: 8653
Joined: Mon 18 Oct 2004, 02:00:00

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Whitefang » Mon 17 Feb 2014, 17:17:52

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-26214135

He also highlighted the possible effects on the global economy, including "potentially catastrophic effects" on the global supply chain.
John Podesta, a former White House chief of staff, will help Mr Obama prepare executive actions that bypass Congress, where there is deadlock on the issue.


Bypass Congress with executive actions, orders.......that means martial law, worldwide civil war, the last one I suppose.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Podesta

Podesta founded and is currently Chair of the Center for American Progress, a progressive think tank in Washington, D.C., and Counselor to the Center for American Progress Action Fund. In addition to his work at American Progress, Podesta is currently a Visiting Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center, his alma mater, where he has taught classes on Congressional investigations[11] and technology law and policy. He is also a member of the Constitution Project's bipartisan Liberty and Security Committee.


http://www.politico.com/story/2014/02/j ... 03191.html

This was, after all, the man whom Clinton staffers used to joke had an evil twin named Skippy to explain his flashes of imperious anger, slamming doors, slamming phones and berating staffers. He even kept a jar of Skippy peanut butter on his desk.


Great! We need creepy Skippy....jumping up and down barking executive orders.

In the month since he returned as a senior counselor, Podesta has quickly picked up the kind of long-term, big-picture strategic thinking that this White House has always talked about priding itself on but struggled to do in its 2013 year of hell. Still frantically trying to turn things around, Podesta brings what it needed: fresh but experienced perspective, and the clout that comes from having the confidence of the president, despite coming from outside an Obama inner circle that’s resistant to newcomers.

Podesta’s a big proponent of the executive action strategy that the president announced in his State of the Union would define his 2014, and he has become the nexus of thinking through everything from the legal questions to involving Cabinet secretaries in their development and implementation. He’s become the point man on data and privacy as part of the NSA reforms and implementing the president’s environmental regulations

During his State of the Union address, Obama said of his proposals: “Some require congressional action, and I’m eager to work with all of you. But America does not stand still, and neither will I. So wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for more American families, that’s what I’m going to do.”

Podesta is not an academic. He’s not quoting Rutherford B. Hayes, or citing obscure government reports he’s been up through the night reading. He gets the politics. He’s been known to chime in on the communications strategy.



http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-12-2 ... genda.html
The activist vision of the 64-year-old former chief of staff to President Bill Clinton could play out across the economy, encompassing matters such as greenhouse gas emission standards for power plants, food safety and border enforcement.
“John will be an advocate for forceful executive action, either for its own sake or to force congressional action,” said Jake Siewert, a former Clinton White House press secretary who is now a managing director at Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

Among the proposals Podesta forwarded to Obama three years ago as head of the Center for American Progress, a research group with close ties to the administration, were a $2-per-barrel fee on imported oil to finance clean-energy projects, solar panels for Air Force hangars and curbs on detention of undocumented immigrants without criminal records.


Goldman Sachs were part of Bilderberg group that brought worldwide war of terror.
This is a planner, usefull tool in hands of the few that do prepping with large army and slaves.
User avatar
Whitefang
Heavy Crude
Heavy Crude
 
Posts: 384
Joined: Fri 12 May 2006, 02:00:00

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Whitefang » Tue 18 Feb 2014, 05:28:11

Under the theme “We Can’t Wait,” the White House started a series of executive actions before the 2012 election, including an order to stop deporting undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, if they have no criminal record. Unable to win passage of a gun-control bill, Obama announced moves on firearms using his presidential authority earlier this year.


http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-12-2 ... genda.html

“Your time is short and you want to do as much as you can,” said Hess, who has studied the presidency since serving in Dwight Eisenhower’s administration. “You then want to do things by executive orders and executive regulations.”


Reassuring Presence

His presence in the White House will reassure environmentalists that administration regulations on cutting greenhouse gas emissions from power plants will be as “effective as possible,” said David Goldston, director of government affairs at the Natural Resources Defense Council, where Podesta has been on the board of the group’s political arm.


Thwarting Rule

During Clinton’s last year in office, Republican lawmakers tried to thwart an EPA regulation in the final stages of review. They tacked a rider onto a bill funding military construction and disaster assistance that would have barred the use of government money to complete the rule which set stricter pollution standards for watersheds.

The president couldn’t afford to veto the legislation, and after a series of meetings led by Podesta, his aides came up with their own gambit: stall on signing the legislation while they rushed the rule through the review, said Chuck Fox, then the EPA’s assistant administrator for water.
User avatar
Whitefang
Heavy Crude
Heavy Crude
 
Posts: 384
Joined: Fri 12 May 2006, 02:00:00

Re: International Climate Negotiations Pt. 2 (merged)

Unread postby Keith_McClary » Tue 18 Feb 2014, 14:25:57

Kerry's (long) Indonesia speech FWIW:

http://iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/engl ... z2theTrCKQ
"I could go on, but let’s veer off in another direction instead."

– The Archdruid
User avatar
Keith_McClary
Fusion
Fusion
 
Posts: 7279
Joined: Wed 21 Jul 2004, 02:00:00
Location: Suburban tar sands

Next

Return to Environment, Weather & Climate

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests